Community Organization – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 10:31:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://avvensanchea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6.png Community Organization – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ 32 32 Covid Vaccinations Among American Latinos Rise Thanks To Community Awareness | Coronavirus https://avvensanchea.com/covid-vaccinations-among-american-latinos-rise-thanks-to-community-awareness-coronavirus/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 09:02:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/covid-vaccinations-among-american-latinos-rise-thanks-to-community-awareness-coronavirus/ THEiliana Borrero balanced her sleeping baby on one leg as she sat and waited the 15 minutes that a nurse asked her to stay in case she had any reactions to her first dose of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine. Borrero, 38, was accompanied by her nine children, three of whom also received the blow. They […]]]>

THEiliana Borrero balanced her sleeping baby on one leg as she sat and waited the 15 minutes that a nurse asked her to stay in case she had any reactions to her first dose of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine.

Borrero, 38, was accompanied by her nine children, three of whom also received the blow.

They were sitting in a room next to a hallway of the sprawling Prince of Peace Church in Flowery Branch, a suburb about 75 miles northeast of Atlanta. It was a recent Sunday afternoon; a mass in Spanish had just started in the large neighboring chapel.

Borrero’s decision to get the shot put her in a national trend that has been going on for several months and bodes well for Latinos, the country’s largest vulnerable population. As the United States experiences a wave of cases linked to the highly infectious Delta variant, just over one in four vaccines nationwide now goes to Latinos, even though their share of the US population is only by 17.2%, according to the CDC.

No other racial or ethnic group has been vaccinated at rates so far in excess of its share of the population. The figures are based on 59% of all people who have received at least one dose of the vaccine, as not all states report this data, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Yet the trend is reversing accounts that began late last year, suggesting that Latinos were reluctant to seek the vaccine, even though they are twice as likely to die and nearly three times as likely to be. hospitalized because of the virus.

Borrero was one of more than three dozen people who were also vaccinated at the church, with the help of bilingual outreach workers from a Georgia-based nonprofit called the Latino Community Fund (LCF) and nurse Leah Buchanan, who works with CORE, an international crisis response organization. The two are working on the ground in Georgia to get Latinos vaccinated, with financial support from private and public sources, including local, state and federal agencies.

The partnership between the two organizations and the church is emblematic of the driving force behind the increase in Latin American immunizations nationwide: the government and some private funders supporting local and nonprofit organizations, which in turn. tour draw on a large network of community relations ranging from places of worship to football coaches and cashiers in local markets.

The idea, said Genesis Castro, network and program manager for LCF, is to “get to places where people congregate” and identify and remove as many barriers as possible to help them get along. get vaccinated – including speaking their language, if necessary.

It’s a public health approach that has already been successful in reaching historically marginalized populations, said Priti Radha Krishtel, co-founder of the Initiative for Medicines, Access & Knowledge, an international nonprofit that works on equity. in health. “Time and time again – as seen with HIV or hepatitis C – when you develop community strategies and community-based, culturally appropriate content you will achieve better results,” she said. .

In the case of Covid, “the initial increase in vaccinations concerned people who had access to them. The infrastructure has favored a certain segment of the population, ”said Angelina Esparza, associate vice president for health equity at the CDC Foundation, which has provided $ 30 million in mostly federal funds to more than 170 community organizations. working on immunization of underserved communities across the United States. “In order to increase immunization rates in marginalized populations, you need to increase awareness and education, and look at accessibility issues,” she added.

Working in Maryland, Dr. Michelle LaRue has taken steps as simple as scheduling vaccination events from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. to reach people after work, and to “move mass vaccination sites to the community.” “.

“We wanted to make sure the protocols we put in place didn’t create barriers,” said LaRue, who heads the health and social services department of CASA, an immigrant advocacy and services organization.

LaRue pointed to a local government funded cartoon public service ad that featured “the abuelinaA grandmother who spoke Spanish and urged her community to get vaccinated. The effort came from focus groups with Latinos. “We asked, ‘Who are you listening to? »», She declared. “It turned out to be a local person – not Fauci or Biden. It was the pastor, or the abuela. “

In the months following the vaccine rollout earlier this year, his organization created a team of five Latinos focused on vaccine promotion. An information line went from receiving several hundred calls per month to receiving the same amount in a week.

In North Carolina, Edith M Nieves López, a pediatrician, trained people hired by community organizations on “how to overcome misconceptions” about the vaccine. At the same time, “word of mouth is the best promoter you can find,” said Nieves López. “Once your neighbor is vaccinated and you notice that it isn’t a zombie, you say, ‘That may not be true.

“I used to get more questions about things like microchips and fertility affected by the vaccine,” she said. In recent months, “I don’t hear so much misinformation.”

Nieves López also helped community members in his area complete vaccine registration forms. “They cannot read or write,” she said. She posts her cell phone number online and receives SMS and WhatsApp messages about vaccination sites.

Reaching Latinos at the high rates seen in recent months is the result of “continuous feedback loops,” said Carolina Escobar, deputy director of site development for CORE. “We pay attention to the smallest details… If we find that a registration system is not working, we organize more drop-in events. “

Or, seeing that Uber and Lyft are offering free rides to vaccination sites, “you notice who’s on the other end of the phone. Do they speak spanish? Are the people who need the rides tech-savvy? Volunteers or community organizations help plan the rides, she said.

In a county in Georgia, his organization has teamed up with football coaches to educate Latin American families about vaccines. “The coach is a figure of confidence. He can say: ‘We have information in Spanish,’ ”she said.

The Kaiser Family Foundation last week released a report digging deeper into CDC data, including state-by-state analysis. The increase in Latin American immunization rates began in the spring, said Samantha Artiga, director of the foundation’s racial equity and health policy program.

If the trend continues, “it means there are increasing levels of protection in the Hispanic community – which is so important because they have been disproportionately affected by the virus,” Artiga said.

Yet, she added, “this does not change the underlying socio-economic indicators that created the risk. They have jobs that are more likely to be exposed to the virus – jobs that can’t be done at home and don’t include other mitigation strategies like wearing masks. “

Leonardo Velásquez, who was at Prince of Peace Church for his first dose, works in commercial construction. He recently moved to northern Georgia from Washington DC, to live with his brother.

The 37-year-old said he “had doubts” about the vaccine. “I thought it wasn’t working,” he said. Then his mother left Mexico to visit the two brothers. “She said I should get the vaccine, for my children – so as not to make them sick,” he said. In the last few months that he has been in Georgia, his brother’s daughter, who is 12, has fallen ill with Covid. His school has closed due to an increase in cases. She has since been vaccinated.

The church is Catholic; a recent survey found that between March and June, acceptance of the vaccine among Hispanic Catholics rose from 56% to 80% – more than any other religious group. Velásquez discovered the church’s vaccination site through a cousin, who was vaccinated there. “Having people who speak Spanish helps,” he said. “You feel more comfortable.”


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It’s the ‘little things’ | News, Sports, Jobs https://avvensanchea.com/its-the-little-things-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 05:02:07 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/its-the-little-things-news-sports-jobs/ -Photo of the messenger by Chad Thompson Harper Lovin, then 14, is gone, and Kaylin Willingham, then 14, granddaughters of the late Reverend Al Henderson, together hold a sign urging the community to stop for pumpkins, apple cider and donuts. It was the family’s way of paying forward for the overwhelming support they say they […]]]>

-Photo of the messenger by Chad Thompson

Harper Lovin, then 14, is gone, and Kaylin Willingham, then 14, granddaughters of the late Reverend Al Henderson, together hold a sign urging the community to stop for pumpkins, apple cider and donuts. It was the family’s way of paying forward for the overwhelming support they say they received following Henderson’s death in October 2019.

Two years after the death of Rev. Al Henderson, his legacy of serving the Fort Dodge community will continue with the second annual Pay it Forward on Friday, October 1.

The event was launched last year by Henderson’s community organization Serving our Servants with St. Paul’s Lutheran Church to honor the late pastor on the anniversary of his death tragic.

The mission was simple: spend a day doing little acts of kindness across town. The Fort Dodge Police Association has distributed gift cards to unsuspecting Dunkin customers. The owners of the Dariette bought coffee for the customers of Central Perk and Dessert. Henderson’s family distributed apple cider, donuts and pumpkins. Countless other members of the community have found a myriad of ways to spread kindness in their own way.

This year, Henderson’s family is organizing a fundraiser to sell t-shirts and sweatshirts for Pay it Forward Friday.

The shirt fundraiser will support the Homicide / Other Violent Crimes program at the Domestic / Sexual Assault Outreach Center. The program supports victims and survivors of violent crime with resources after the crime and throughout the trial. Their support often includes the provision of hotel rooms during trials for witnesses who are not family and cannot receive allowances, or food and gas cards to assist witnesses as the compensation does not pay for meals.

-Photo of the messenger by Chad Thompson

The family of the late Reverend Al Henderson gather for a candlelight vigil in honor of the beloved pastor of Fort Dodge in City Square Park. More than 100 people gathered to show their support on the first anniversary of Henderson’s death. The community has spent the day paying forward in various ways to honor the selfless way Henderson has chosen to live his life.

“They were very helpful to us throughout the process”, said Kandi Lovin, Henderson’s eldest daughter. “D / SAOC is an irreplaceable resource that brings empathy and experience to a process that can be long and frustrating. Navigating without them would be terribly difficult.

It’s hard enough after losing a loved one to a violent crime, dealing with grief, but then adding the sometimes complicated court system to that can make things a lot more difficult.

“We think they are a great resource”, Lovin spoke about the Homicide / Other Violent Crimes program. “But they’ve lost funding and we want to be able to make sure they’re a resource for other families who might find themselves in the same circumstances as us. Our family had a lot of support, but we want it for others too. “

Needing the services provided by HOVC is not something that no one hopes for, but Lovin said she and her family were grateful to have had the support of those who understand the impact of violence during the last two years.

The HOVC program serves an area of ​​15 counties in northern Iowa.

-Photo of the messenger by Chad Thompson

Miranda Parrish, then 5, a kindergarten student at St. Paul’s Lutheran School, admires the stem of a pumpkin she picked up from the Hendersons for the Pay It Forward Friday event in 2020. The family Henderson provided free hot apple cider, donuts and pumpkins to the community to donate in honor of Reverend Al Henderson, a beloved pastor of Fort Dodge who was killed on October 2, 2019.

“With budget cuts we have had to cut many areas and all the money we can get and donations will really help us” said Marie Harvey, HOVC program supervisor. “We are very grateful that they chose us as their recipient.

The deadline to pre-order Pay it Forward shirts and sweatshirts is 11:59 p.m. Sunday. Orders can be placed at https://payitforward2021.itemorder.com/shop/sale/?saleCode=M5TAJ. These shirts will be available in time for Pay it Forward on Friday. Another order for shirts will open later, Harvey said.

Fundraising for the shirts isn’t the only way for community members to get involved with Pay it Forward Friday.

“The beauty of Pay it Forward Friday is that you can do whatever you want” said TJ Pingle, president of Serving Our Servants.

SOS will have Pay it Forward Friday business cards printed with the SOS logo, the phrase “Continue in love and joy” and one of Henderson’s favorite Bible verses printed on them for community members to hand out as they do acts of kindness on October 1. The maps will be available from next week at Shimkat Motor Co.

-Photo of the messenger by Chad Thompson

A pumpkin with the words “Carry on!” Written on it is posted in a carriage at the Hendersons in 2020. “Continue” is a phrase Henderson would often say at the end of a conversation.

“It was a huge success last year when we first did it and I know tons and tons of people have been talking about it, sharing it on social media with the hashtag #PayitForwardFriday.” Pingel said. “It was just a great wellness day to give back and honor Pastor Henderson.”

SOS will have planned certain things to share kindness with local law enforcement and first responders, Pingel said, but the possibilities to pay it forward around town are almost limitless.

“The easiest thing people think of is paying for someone else’s food – it’s a great idea, but it doesn’t even have to be money.” he said. “It could be helping your neighbor with groceries or picking up trash at a local park. These could be simple things like grabbing the door for someone. I think in our time we lose a lot of that personal connection and helping someone with the smallest things can brighten their day.

Lovin said seeing the impact of Pay it Forward on Friday last year meant a lot to the Henderson family.

“Last year it was very useful to us because it was the first anniversary and we were all dreading this day and what it would be like to relive that day again”, she said. “And it was such a positive and rewarding day. For us, that was important because we didn’t want it to be just about daddy’s death, but about how he lived and how amazing the community has been.

The Henderson family will distribute “Kindness kits” in the afternoon on Pay it Forward on Friday, Lovin said. They will also accept donations of cash and gift cards for the HOVC program.

When Henderson was alive, he tried to help everyone he came into contact with, Pingel said.

“That’s kind of the essence of it all – helping someone”, he said. “You never know what someone is going through and what little thing can change their day. He’s changed hundreds and thousands of lives just by doing little things, and it’s something we can all do.

Henderson died after a violent attack outside his church on October 2, 2019. His killer, Josh Pendleton, was convicted of first degree murder and first degree theft and sentenced to life in prison last month .

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How an Atlanta basketball team went from Republican hands to LGBTQ ownership https://avvensanchea.com/how-an-atlanta-basketball-team-went-from-republican-hands-to-lgbtq-ownership/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 15:54:50 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/how-an-atlanta-basketball-team-went-from-republican-hands-to-lgbtq-ownership/ Last summer, at the height of the Black Lives Matter protests sweeping the nation, the Atlanta Dream players united against an off-field opponent: Kelly Loeffler, then U.S. Senator from Georgia and co-owner of the team. . Loeffler, a Republican, had publicly and repeatedly mocked the WNBA for dedicating his season to social justice issues, and […]]]>

Last summer, at the height of the Black Lives Matter protests sweeping the nation, the Atlanta Dream players united against an off-field opponent: Kelly Loeffler, then U.S. Senator from Georgia and co-owner of the team. .

Loeffler, a Republican, had publicly and repeatedly mocked the WNBA for dedicating his season to social justice issues, and in response, Dream players and other teams in the league wore jerseys endorsing Raphael Warnock , a Democrat who then toppled Loeffler in one of two contentious second-round elections in January 2020. It was around this time that talks to sell the team, which had long been in the market and had attracted many potential buyers have started to gain momentum.

Less than two months later, the boards of governors of the WNBA and the NBA unanimously approved the sale of the Atlanta Dream to a group of investors of three members: Larry Gottesdiener, president of the company of Northland real estate investment and now majority owner of the team; Suzanne Abair, President and Chief Operating Officer of Northland; and two-time WNBA champion Renee Montgomery, who became the first former player to become both a WNBA team owner and manager.

Renée Montgomery with Suzanne Abair and Larry Gottesdiener. Courtesy of Atlanta Dream

After stepping down from the 2020 season to focus on social justice issues, Montgomery, who said she was inspired by LeBron James’ role in the “More Than a Vote” campaign, acknowledged the ‘rare and unique opportunity to have a stake in an ownership group that matched her own values, which prompted her to announce her retirement after 11 seasons.

“You can’t be a player and an owner at the same time, and for me it was a pretty quick decision, because I understood it was a big moment that I basically wanted to capitalize on,” Montgomery told NBC News. . “I felt like women’s basketball was changing.

Although there had been no official announcements that the Atlanta Dream was looking for a new owner, Montgomery had “heard the rumblings” from various sources and contacted WNBA commissioner Cathy Engelbert, who introduced her to Abair and Gottesdiener, who were in talks with the league over acquiring a squad.

“At Northland, we essentially focus our philanthropic initiatives around three elements: ending racism, empowering women and ending homelessness,” said Abair. “If you look at these three issues, I think it’s very easy to see that there is a clear alignment in both the progressive nature of the Northland organization and the core values ​​of the WNBA.”

With a similar set of core values, the trio bonded around a common desire to invest in professional and college women’s sports – which they say continues to be underestimated and underrated – and in minority communities in the Greater Atlanta area.

“We really do think there is a need for investors like us to do a number of things: uplift the league, basically bring deep-pocketed investors to the league, build model franchises, respect our players as players. ‘athletes and people. ”Abair said, adding that there is a“ need to change that narrative ”that women’s sports are not worth investing in.

“I would say having Renee as the third member of the owning team has been really incredibly valuable to Larry and I – just to get that former player’s perspective,” Abair continued. “Renee knows the market from a different perspective than ours, and I think the three of us focusing on different aspects as we start to build the organization has been a really good mix. “

Montgomery echoed those sentiments, adding that she understands the “inner workings of the league” and therefore can “do more player-friendly things” during times of travel and free agency. She also thanked Abair and Gottesdiener for bringing best practices from their work at Northland to their business relationship with the team.

“And then, to take it further, I don’t need to keep kicking and screaming to talk about social justice or to lean on the Atlanta community because they are so into business belonging. to minority, small-owned businesses, “Montgomery said.” How can we be part of the community? How can we be part of the culture? ‘ They’re stuck, so any ideas we all have together will always be going to the community first. Obviously we want to be great on the pitch – and it will come, but we want to make sure we’ve been doing our part since. the front office. ”

As a result of their acquisition of the Atlanta Dream, Abair and Montgomery also became among the first openly LGBTQ people to own and operate a large professional sports franchise in the United States, helping to pave the way for an industry that has historically lacked queer representation on and off the field (although the WNBA has a long list of absent players). It is a responsibility that the two women, who know what it is like not to be seen or portrayed, do not take lightly.

“I think it’s important for community members, especially the younger ones, to see it and know that if you’re a member of the LGBTQ community, you can do great things,” Abair said. “There is a tremendous opportunity for you everywhere, and I think if you see it you can be, or you can believe it. I think just being visible to members of the community is really important, whether it’s as a female business owner in the real estate industry or as the owner of a professional female sports team.

For Montgomery, “representation is the foundation I stand on in everything I do,” she said with natural fervor. “So when I’m in a room and it’s a project I’m creating, I want to make sure there’s representation all around – black women, Latin women, LGBTQ. [people]. I want to make sure that in all the things I do, there are voices out there that can add to it. Because, for me, when you have different people from different backgrounds, you have different contributions, and that’s how you build a great brand, a great company.

When they officially acquired the squad in early March, Gottesdiener, Abair and Montgomery were within six weeks of the start of training camp. Describing the next month and a half of preparation as “a total sprint,” Abair said the group faced a steep learning curve as they worked diligently to familiarize themselves with the inner workings of the team and the team. strict, league-mandated Covid-19 protocols.

But as the direction of the front office has changed, the new co-owners have been keen to reaffirm their determination to honor the same spirit that brought women’s basketball to the fore last year – and recently earned the Atlanta Dream. ESPN’s “Sports Humanitarian Team of the Year Award.”

“It’s not like this is a one-size-fits-all goal for the players, and we will continue to honor that spirit and commitment around causes that players and others in the organization care deeply about,” said Abair. “We have to live up to our name. We are the Atlanta Dream, named after Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Our goal is to build an organization that honors the legacy of our name by standing up to respond to the urgency of the present, whatever the political landscape. “

“With the civil unrest that occurred in 2020, I think a lot of people have opened their eyes not just to social justice but to women’s sport,” Montgomery added. “A lot of people were introduced to the WNBA in 2020 in the sense that they didn’t know the culture of the league, the players in the league, what we stood for. I was really happy to see people starting to dig deeper into the WNBA players and storylines, and now we have new fans.

Despite the change in leadership in the United States Senate, Montgomery said the country’s current socio-political situation continues to be a priority for the entire organization, particularly as state and federal governments embrace laws on increasingly sensitive issues such as the right to vote and abortion.

With no intention of rehashing the past, the co-owners reported that with their acquisition of the Dream, they were committed to creating a “flagship WNBA franchise”, partnering with other community organizations and winning. both on and off the field.

“It means building an organization on both the business side and the basketball side with a winning culture,” said Abair. “When we talk about winning on the pitch, we mean [something] that lives up to our name… that our players are visible in the community and that we are fundamentally a valued member of the Atlanta and Greater Atlanta market, like other professional sports teams in the market. [We mean] occupy our own space and have our own brand and really elevate professional women’s sport in a relatively crowded sports market.

In the end, it comes down to “not being afraid to take a stand on issues, even though it might not be the most popular thing, but you do it because you think it’s right.” , said Abair.

“I would be lying if I said that I didn’t want to create a dynasty here, where every year we compete, and it’s a surprise if we don’t… And then, in the same breath, our goal is to to be that North Star in the WNBA, ”Montgomery added. “Suzanne emailed all the players at the start of the season asking, ‘What questions are you passionate about? What do you want us to look at? “We want to be able to adapt to the players we have. … But we really want to be that organization that looks at social justice, that looks at empowering women. These are the pillars on which we stand.

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Calendar | News, Sports, Jobs https://avvensanchea.com/calendar-news-sports-jobs-3/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 04:12:46 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/calendar-news-sports-jobs-3/ Editor’s Note: The Sentinel offers nonprofits and other community organizations the opportunity to promote upcoming events in this community calendar for free for three days prior to the event. Events requiring reservations can also be promoted up to two weeks before the reservation date. Submit articles at least one working week before publication by e-mail, […]]]>

Editor’s Note: The Sentinel offers nonprofits and other community organizations the opportunity to promote upcoming events in this community calendar for free for three days prior to the event. Events requiring reservations can also be promoted up to two weeks before the reservation date.

Submit articles at least one working week before publication by e-mail, events@lewistownsentinel.com; voicemail, (717) 248-6741; online, virtual press room at www.lewistownsentinel.com; or by mail or deposit, The Sentinel, PO Box 588 Lewistown, PA 17044. The publisher reserves the right to modify all submissions.

With all submissions you must include a phone number for verification purposes. The phone number is not for publication unless otherwise specified.

If your organization would like to add a recurring event (for example, every Monday, third Thursday) that has been canceled due to the pandemic, contact Lifestyles editor Jeff Fishbein, email living@lewistownsentinel.com, or call ( 717) 248-6741, ext. 108.

Reserve now

¯ Freedom Avenue United Methodist Church Garage Sale – 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday September 17 and 18. be available for purchase. Tables available for $ 15. For more information or to reserve a table, contact Darla Rickert (717) 635-0919.

Milroy Presbyterian Church Chicken BBQ – Ready by 11:00 am on Saturday, September 25, at 321 S. Main St., Milroy. $ 5 / half. Limited supply, so call (717) 667-3438 or (717) 437-5818 to order. Please leave a message if no one answers. Call before 7 p.m. on September 24.

¯ Goose or Chicken Dinner – Pick up only 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. September 29 at Decatur Fire Co. Cookhouse, North 522, Alfarata. Goose $ 16 per dinner, or chicken $ 14 per dinner. Mashed potatoes, garnish, sauce, corn, pepper salad, applesauce and cake. Call to order at (717) 543-0921 before September 23. Pre-orders served only.

¯LHS Breakfast Class 1958 – 9 a.m., September 25 at Sal-Lee’s, Strodes Mills. Call Theresa Schaaf at (717) 667-2389 to reserve a chair at the table.

¯ Annual Ellen Chapel Chicken BBQ – September 25 at the Ellen Chapel Lodge, Ferguson Valley Road, Lewistown. Cost $ 5 per half. Bakery products and side dishes available at 10 a.m. Chicken walk-in available at 11 a.m. Advance orders: (717) 248-9576 or (717) 250-7776.

Friday September 17th

¯Free Community Lunch – 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., New Life Church, 101 N. Beech St., Burnham.

¯ Shelter Services Garage Sale – 9 am to 2 pm, at both locations, 13 Depot St. Lewistown and 982 Parcheytown Road, Lewistown. 100 percent of the proceeds go to help the homeless.

Saturday September 18

¯ Millerstown United Methodist Church Fall Bazaar – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Church Social Hall. Crafts, gifts and decorating ideas. Dishes such as apple dumplings, soups, sandwiches, pies and cakes are available for purchase with drinks. Breakfast served to visitors and breakfast and lunch are available in the cafe.

¯ Shelter Services Garage Sale – 9 am to 2 pm, at both locations, 13 Depot St. Lewistown and 982 Parcheytown Road, Lewistown. 100 percent of the proceeds go to help the homeless.

¯ Auction to benefit Ronald McDonald House Danville – 9:00 a.m., Juniata County Product Auction Site, Cedar Spring Road, Mifflintown.

¯ Milroy Lions Club Chicken BBQ – 11:00 am pickup, Milroy Ball Court.

¯ Walmart Associates Past and Present Picnic – 11 a.m., Brown Lodge at Kishacoquillas Park. Burgers, hot dogs and water provided. Please bring a covered dish.

¯ Chicken BBQ – Pickup 11:00 a.m., West Granville Township Fire Co., Strodes Mills. To pre-order, call (717) 248-0665.

¯Picnic for Walmart Associates Past and Present – 11 a.m., Brown Lodge, Kish Park. Burgers, hot dogs and water provided. Bring a covered dish. For further information: Kathy Parson at (717) 248-4421.

Salvation Army Lewistown Neighborhood Party – 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Games, prizes, food, crafts and more.

¯Keystone State Muscle Cars Cruise – 5-8 p.m., Londonderry Restaurant and Pub, Reedsville, across from Rutter’s. All cars, trucks, motorcycles are welcome. Meets every Saturday until October 30.

Sunday September 19

¯ Flea Market – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Lewistown Moose, 80 Brady Lane.

¯ A Day of Hope (Suicide Awareness) – 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Hungry Run Distillery (Vira). Cornhole tournament organized by Mid-Penn Cornhole, Bodyweight bench competition, basket raffle (over 70 items). Food trucks including Chief Logan Lions fries and barbecue truck, Hungry Run Distillery Products. All proceeds go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Free entry. Call Amy Koenig at (610) 767-2545 or Elyse Baisey at (717) 247-5289 for more information.

Monday, September 20

¯Mifflin County Library Board Meeting – 5:15 p.m. via Zoom. Email smiriello@mifflincountylibrary.org for the link and more information.

Meetings

Upcoming meetings are posted in the calendar. Missing classmate requests are posted once and repeated only if they are updated. Brief minutes of meetings and photos of class reunions with identified individuals in the order in which they appear are accepted for publication in the Living section. The deadline for submitting reviews is one week before publication. Submit meeting notices to Jeff Fishbein at The Sentinel; email living@lewistownsentinel.com or call (717) 248-6741.

1959 Juniata High School Class Meeting – 4 p.m. Sept. 18 at Bread of Life Restaurant. To reserve, dial (717) 513-7629 or (717) 436-6178.

¯IVHS and LAHS Class of 1991 30th meeting – September 25 at the Hungry Run Distillery. The cost is $ 10 per person. More information: ivhslahs1991@gmail.com.

¯Meeting of Chef Logan Class of 1958 – October 9 at the Hill store in Belleville. Meeting at 4 p.m., meal at 6 a.m. Reservations are required and must be made by Sept. 25. To reserve: Nellie Wilson, (717) 953-9288 or Shirley Brown, (717) 248-2967.

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Mid-Autumn Festival brings light, community and mooncakes to Oakland https://avvensanchea.com/mid-autumn-festival-brings-light-community-and-mooncakes-to-oakland/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 17:06:38 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/mid-autumn-festival-brings-light-community-and-mooncakes-to-oakland/ A mixed nut moon cake from Ruby King Bakery Cafe in Oakland Chinatown. Credit: Sheena C./Yelp Eastlake / Little Saigon Mid-Autumn FestivalClinton Park (655 International Blvd), OaklandSept. 18, 2021, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Lincoln Summer NightsLincoln Park (261 11th Street), OaklandThursdays from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. from September 16 to October 21. […]]]>


A mixed nut moon cake from Ruby King Bakery Cafe in Oakland Chinatown. Credit: Sheena C./Yelp

Eastlake / Little Saigon Mid-Autumn Festival
Clinton Park (655 International Blvd), Oakland
Sept. 18, 2021, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Lincoln Summer Nights
Lincoln Park (261 11th Street), Oakland
Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. from September 16 to October 21.

The Mid-Autumn Festival traditionally falls on the 15th day of the eighth month of the lunar calendar, which this year is on the Gregorian calendar on September 21. On this date, many families in East and Southeast Asia are celebrating by sharing moon cakes – the sweet, moon-round pastries – enjoying the lanterns and together admiring the beauty of what one is on. thinks to be the brightest moon of the year. It is a celebration of family and harvest, a cultural tradition that focuses on meeting loved ones.

This week, several Oakland-based community organizations are joining forces to re-launch a local celebration of the day. After a hiatus in 2020 and with ongoing health and safety concerns in mind, Clinton Park will host the Eastlake / Little Saigon Mid-Autumn Festival this year on Saturday, September 18 from noon to 5 p.m.

Led by the Vietnamese Chamber of Commerce this year, in partnership with the restaurant support association Good Good Eatz, the festival will feature a procession with lanterns, as well as games and a moon cake-making workshop for children.

During the 2019 Mid-Autumn Festival – the last time the event was held – patrons filled with sweet moonpies from local vendors. Credit: Vietnamese Oakland Chamber of Commerce / Facebook

“The festival in our Vietnamese culture, known as Tet Trung Thu, is a lot like Halloween,” said Trinh Banh of Good Good Eatz, the organization that provides support and technical expertise to often-owned small food businesses. to immigrants in Oakland areas like Eastlake / Little Saigon, Fruitvale and Chinatown.

Banh remembers celebrating as a child: “The children take their lanterns and go for a walk to buy treats. From what I remember when I was a kid it was [the tradition] about sharing and gifting to your loved ones, exchanging moon cakes with your loved ones.

This week also kicks off Lincoln Summer Nights, which will be held on September 16 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Lincoln Park (261 11th St. near Oakland Chinatown) with its own celebration of paper lanterns. Co-sponsored by Friends of Lincoln Park and the Oakland Chinatown Coalition, the event takes place every Thursday evening from September 16 to October 21.

Both celebrations will be marked by the display of nearly 2,000 hand-painted solar-powered lanterns by 1,500 students and 50 teachers from four schools in the Oakland Unified School District: Lincoln Elementary, Clinton Park Elementary, Oakland Tech High School and FADA (Fashion, Art, and Academy of Design).

Behind the lantern project, said Tommy Wong, founder of Civic Design Studios and co-founder of Good Good Eatz, lies an effort to strengthen the digital infrastructure of older businesses in the region. To that end, Cut Fruit Collective, a group of artists and creatives that produced last year’s successful zine fundraiser, Save Our Chinatowns, are teaming up with Good Good Eatz to help paint lanterns. and will soon publish a guide to buying moon cakes.

Lanterns painted by 600 Franklin Elementary students for the 2021 Mid-Autumn Festival in Clinton Park. Credit: Civic Design Studio / Instagram

Banh pointed out that this year’s festival, while somewhat low-key compared to celebrations of the past, is intended to boost the morale of community members and provide support to businesses serving the AAPI community.

“A lot of businesses are still struggling, and in some ways it’s even worse now,” Banh said. With deep ties to the neighborhood, Banh hopes the festival will help draw attention to restaurants and businesses in the area – places her mother has “been shopping since we’ve been living in this neighborhood for about 30 years.” years … places like Cam Huong, Sun Sang [Market], Sunshine Hop Fat [Market], Lee’s sandwiches.

At Lincoln Summer Nights, expect interactive games and arts and crafts activities for families, as well as resource sharing from local community groups. According to Tommy Wong, founder of Civic Design Studio, the event was from its inception intended to enliven community interaction in the park, with the dual objective of improving public safety due to increased foot traffic and increased traffic. community presence.

Civic Design Studio works with schools and teachers while connecting them to neighborhoods as cross-sector partners to work on art and design projects that serve to strengthen communities. Students and teachers were excited about the lantern project, Wong said, and it’s a way for them to feel good about sharing something they are creating with their communities.

This year, Wong said, organizers have carefully planned activities to ensure attendees are as safe as possible from exposure to COVID-19. The painting and hanging of the lanterns has been purposefully separated to take place in small gatherings, and the real event of the Lantern Festival will involve an open-air procession to keep attendees moving.

“This is all part of a great decentralized effort to celebrate our legacy,” Wong said. “This year’s event is to… build community – our form of security – by putting culture at the forefront to meet the needs of our community.



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Calendar | News, Sports, Jobs https://avvensanchea.com/calendar-news-sports-jobs-2/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 04:12:54 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/calendar-news-sports-jobs-2/ Editor’s Note: The Sentinel offers nonprofits and other community organizations the opportunity to promote upcoming events in this community calendar for free for three days prior to the event. Events requiring reservations can also be promoted up to two weeks before the reservation date. Submit articles at least one working week before publication by e-mail, […]]]>

Editor’s Note: The Sentinel offers nonprofits and other community organizations the opportunity to promote upcoming events in this community calendar for free for three days prior to the event. Events requiring reservations can also be promoted up to two weeks before the reservation date.

Submit articles at least one working week before publication by e-mail, events@lewistownsentinel.com; voicemail, (717) 248-6741; online, virtual press room at www.lewistownsentinel.com; or by mail or deposit, The Sentinel, PO Box 588 Lewistown, PA 17044. The publisher reserves the right to modify all submissions.

With all submissions, you must include a phone number for verification purposes. The phone number is not for publication unless otherwise noted.

If your organization would like to add a recurring event (for example, every Monday, third Thursday) that has been canceled due to the pandemic, contact Lifestyles editor Jeff Fishbein, email living@lewistownsentinel.com, or call ( 717) 248-6741, ext. 108.

Reserve now

¯ Freedom Avenue United Methodist Church Garage Sale – 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday September 17 and 18. be available for purchase. Tables available for $ 15. For more information or to reserve a table, contact Darla Rickert (717) 635-0919.

Milroy Presbyterian Church Chicken BBQ – Ready by 11:00 am on Saturday, September 25, at 321 S. Main St., Milroy. $ 5 / half. Limited supply, so call (717) 667-3438 or (717) 437-5818 to order. Please leave a message if no one answers. Call before 7 p.m. on September 24.

¯ Goose or Chicken Dinner – Pick up only 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. September 29 at Decatur Fire Co. Cookhouse, North 522, Alfarata. Goose $ 16 per dinner, or chicken $ 14 per dinner. Mashed potatoes, garnish, sauce, corn, pepper salad, applesauce and cake. Call to order at (717) 543-0921 before Monday September 23, 2021. Pre-orders served only.

¯LHS Breakfast Class 1958 – 9 a.m., September 25 at Sal-Lee’s, Strodes Mills. Call Theresa Schaaf at (717) 667-2389 to reserve a chair at the table.

¯ Ellen Chapel Annual Chicken BBQ – September 25 at the Ellen Chapel Lodge, Ferguson Valley Road, Lewistown. Cost $ 5 per half. Bakery products and side dishes available at 10 a.m. Chicken walk-in available at 11 a.m. Advance orders: (717) 248-9576 or (717) 250-7776.

Thursday September 16

¯ Shelter Services Garage Sale – 9 am to 2 pm, at both locations, 13 Depot St. Lewistown and 982 Parcheytown Road, Lewistown. 100 percent of the proceeds go to help the homeless.

¯ Juniata Joint High School Class of 1962 Lunch – Noon gathering and menu ordering at 1 p.m. at the Bread of Life restaurant in McAlisterville. Information: (717) 250-7751.

¯Lewistown High School Class of 1957 Ladies Lunch – noon, Blue Flag at Kishacoquillas Park. Bring some lunch.

Chef Logan’s 1960 High School Class Lunch – Noon, Kountry Kitchen, McVeytown. For further information: Fay Headings at (717) 242-1258.

¯ Chef Logan’s 1958 High School Class Lunch – Noon, Bel-Vue Inn, Reedsville.

¯ Town Hall – 7 p.m., Port Royal fire station. Residents of Port Royal are encouraged to attend.

¯Kishacoquillas Class of ’68 Lunch – 11 a.m., Honey Creek Inn.

Bingo – 1 p.m., Yeagertown Senior Center.

Friday September 17th

¯Free Community Lunch – 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., New Life Church, 101 N. Beech St., Burnham.

¯ Shelter Services Garage Sale – 9 am to 2 pm, at both locations, 13 Depot St. Lewistown and 982 Parcheytown Road, Lewistown. Profits support the homeless.

Saturday September 18

¯ Millerstown United Methodist Church Fall Bazaar – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Church Social Hall. Crafts, gifts and decorating ideas. Dishes such as apple dumplings, soups, sandwiches, pies and cakes are available for purchase with drinks. Breakfast served to visitors and breakfast and lunch are available in the cafe.

¯ Shelter Services Garage Sale – 9 am to 2 pm, at both locations, 13 Depot St. Lewistown and 982 Parcheytown Road, Lewistown. Profits support the homeless.

¯ Auction to benefit Ronald McDonald House Danville – 9:00 a.m., Juniata County Product Auction Site, Cedar Spring Road, Mifflintown.

¯ Milroy Lions Club Chicken BBQ – 11:00 am pickup, Milroy Ball Court.

¯ Chicken BBQ – Pickup 11:00 a.m., West Granville Township Fire Co., Strodes Mills. To pre-order, call (717) 248-0665.

¯Picnic for Walmart Associates Past and Present – 11 a.m., Brown Lodge, Kish Park. Burgers, hot dogs and water provided. Bring a covered dish. For further information: Kathy Parson at (717) 248-4421.

¯Keystone State Muscle Cars Cruise – 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., Londonderry Restaurant and Pub, Reedsville, across from Rutter’s. All cars, trucks, motorcycles are welcome. Meets every Saturday until October 30.

Lewistown Salvation Army Block Party – 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Games, prizes, food, crafts and more.

Meetings

Upcoming meetings are posted in the calendar. Missing classmate requests are posted once and repeated only if they are updated. Brief minutes of meetings and photos of class reunions with identified individuals in the order in which they appear are accepted for publication in the Living section. The deadline for submitting reviews is one week before publication. Submit meeting notices to Jeff Fishbein at The Sentinel; email living@lewistownsentinel.com or call (717) 248-6741.

1959 Juniata High School Class Meeting – 4 p.m. Sept. 18 at the Bread of Life Restaurant. To reserve, dial (717) 513-7629 or (717) 436-6178.

¯IVHS and LAHS Class of 1991 30th meeting – September 25 at the Hungry Run Distillery. The cost is $ 10 per person. Information: ivhslahs1991@gmail.com.

¯ Chief Logan’s Class of 1958 reunion – October 9 at the Hill store in Belleville. Meeting at 4 p.m., meal at 6 a.m. Reservations are required and must be made by Sept. 25. To reserve: Nellie Wilson, (717) 953-9288 or Shirley Brown, (717) 248-2967.

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How will America recover from a broken school year? https://avvensanchea.com/how-will-america-recover-from-a-broken-school-year/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 00:08:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/how-will-america-recover-from-a-broken-school-year/ For me, as someone whose entire career has been based in low income communities, it’s scary looking at the data. I know 20 years from now we’re not going to make excuses for future adults and say, ‘Oh, but those were Covid kids. “ Pedro Martinez: We saw strong differences in academic achievement in our […]]]>

For me, as someone whose entire career has been based in low income communities, it’s scary looking at the data. I know 20 years from now we’re not going to make excuses for future adults and say, ‘Oh, but those were Covid kids. “

Pedro Martinez: We saw strong differences in academic achievement in our district between our kids who attended distance school and our kids who were there in person – in some math classes, distance school had a drop of 30 points proficiency rates on state assessment tests from 2019 to 2021. This was also evident in other districts of Texas. I keep saying that the drop in marks is not a reflection of the ability of my students, it is not a reflection of the work of my teachers. It was really the conditions last year.

The share of low-income students attending a distant school at the end of 2020 was 64%. It was 48% for high income students.

Schwinn: In Tennessee, about 80% of families chose to return their children in person last year, while 20% did not. There were real compromises. Where students were less likely to be in school, I saw more children hit by cars, who were in ATV crashes, or were shot and killed – sorts of tragedies that might not have happened if these children had been in a school building. In many ways, deciding whether or not to send your child to school during a wave of Covid – that was an impossible choice.

Jenny Radesky: Whether students had access to a virtual or in-person school had a significant impact on their mental health. In some districts here, we have seen children return to school in person in the fall of 2020 and thrive once they return. We surveyed about 300 parents of elementary school students in Michigan and found that distance learners had significantly higher hyperactivity, peer problems, challenge, and difficulty sleeping than children. attending school in person.

The school is so organized and grounded for the kids. I focus on children with autism, ADHD, deficits in executive functioning, trauma, learning disabilities and developmental delays. They see the world in an atypical way and are often misunderstood. Without the school environment, which helps them contain their thoughts and emotions, many of my patients were totally deregulated. I’ve heard story after story about sleep issues and regressing to behaviors kids haven’t shown for a long time. They simply did not have access to the same therapies and role models as their peers. I had to double the number of hours I worked with patients to meet needs.

I also saw huge disparities in the support the children had. I practice in both Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti which has a higher rate of child poverty and incarceration and substance abuse. The General Motors plant there closed in 2010. During the lockdown it was the families in Ann Arbor who called and said I need help – please send me a new referral to a therapist. I have heard much less often from the families of Ypsilanti, who may not have had wait to help.


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Liz Stewart: Helping the Aiken Community with Business Expertise | Sunday clothes https://avvensanchea.com/liz-stewart-helping-the-aiken-community-with-business-expertise-sunday-clothes/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/liz-stewart-helping-the-aiken-community-with-business-expertise-sunday-clothes/ Liz Stewart is not referring to the stage of life she is in now as retired. Instead, “shifting gears” is the term used by Stewart. “I have just moved to a new phase,” she said. “I tell people that I am in my inheritance phase. It’s partly to keep myself busy, but I’m very attached […]]]>

Liz Stewart is not referring to the stage of life she is in now as retired.

Instead, “shifting gears” is the term used by Stewart.

“I have just moved to a new phase,” she said. “I tell people that I am in my inheritance phase. It’s partly to keep myself busy, but I’m very attached to the causes that I support.

Stewart, 75, sits on the board of directors of Rural Health Services and will soon become its chairman.

She also chairs the parish council of the Catholic Church of St. Mary Help of Christians.

Additionally, Stewart serves on executive committees that help guide the Aiken Technical College Foundation, USC Aiken’s Aiken Partnership Council, and the Aiken Rotary Club.

She is also the treasurer of the board of directors of the Aiken County Child Advocacy Center and the vice-chair of the Aiken County Planning Commission.

“I believe we have an obligation to serve in the community that we benefit from,” said Stewart, who has been a local resident since 1989. “I have enjoyed life in Aiken so much that I think I should give back. “

Stewart is a past president of the Aiken Rotary Club and a past chair of the Aiken Planning Commission.

In 2008, the Aiken Chamber of Commerce awarded her the title of Woman of the Year.

Stewart received the USC Aiken Distinguished Partner Award in 2014, and she was the school’s Distinguished Citizen of the Year in 2020.

And these are just a few of Stewart’s many accolades.

“His skills and extensive knowledge of things are very broad and deep,” said Aiken Town Manager Stuart Bedenbaugh. “She has a lot of talent and is very generous with her time. When I read something that is happening in a nonprofit or community organization, it is always at the heart of the matter.

In 1984, Stewart founded Stewart and Associates Inc., a national consulting firm whose clients over the years have included Xerox, 3M, IBM, Atlantic Broadband, and the Florida Power & Light Company.

Stewart and Associates offers various surveys and assessments to its clients and provides assistance with leadership development and organizational processes such as strategic planning and succession planning.

There are branches in San Francisco, Tampa, Atlanta, Houston, and three other locations.

One of his proudest moments, said Stewart, was the launch of Stewart and Associates.

Another married her second husband, Ray Jewell, who died in 2018.

“He was the love of my life,” said Stewart.

Her third proudest moment was when she handed over Stewart and Associates to her employees after Jewell’s death.

“I knew over 200 people and their families were going to have a bright future,” said Stewart.

But they do not move forward alone. She stays in touch.

“Even though I have transferred ownership to the staff, I still own the copyright to a lot of things, so I get royalties. It’s my retirement plan, ”said Stewart. “I attend the weekly Zoom management team meetings, and they call me once or twice a week with questions.”

Meanwhile, Stewart uses his business consulting expertise to help others.

She serves as a mentor to young professional women.

“They deal with a lot of the same issues that women did 30 to 40 years ago,” said Stewart. “Some of the solutions we tried back then didn’t work, so I’m helping them develop different strategies. “

During the novel coronavirus pandemic, Stewart gave advice to business owners on how they can adapt to changing circumstances.

“Everyone kind of had to redefine themselves a bit, and that’s where innovative thinking came in,” she said. “I tell them, ‘This was your business, but it can’t be like this now, so how do you do it differently?’ I challenge them.

“There were retail businesses that didn’t have an online presence,” Stewart continued. “Well, if you’re closed, you’ve got to have an online presence.”

Stewart has also advised contractors.

“I think very strongly in the business world that nothing really exciting or innovative happens until an entrepreneur starts, so I think fostering entrepreneurship is absolutely crucial,” he said. she declared. “A lot of entrepreneurs have special passion and skills, but the business side – hiring people and managing them – is often a weakness. “

Some of the aspiring business owners who have thrived under Stewart’s leadership are Ashley Elvis and Casey Young, who founded Board in Aiken, which offers custom charcuterie platters, and artist Cara Leverette, who creates paintings in watercolor and acrylic.

“There are some things now that make when my brain and my heart say go for it, my body says, ‘No, not today’. But I can still think and I want to share my knowledge for as long as I can, ”said Stewart. “I would someday look down from the sky and say, ‘Wow, these companies are doing well. I’m so glad I helped. “

A native of Daytona Beach, Florida, Stewart grew up with six brothers, five of whom were adopted.

“My dad gave us an allowance of 15 cents a week, and he gave it to us in three cents,” she said. “We had to put a dime in our piggy banks. We had to do something right with a nickel. If you couldn’t think of anything, you would put it in the church offering dish. And we could spend and enjoy the third nickel. It helped me prioritize things. You save some, you help other people and then you’re going to have fun.

Additionally, Stewart and his brothers each had to participate in at least one sport.

Surfing became a passion for Stewart, and she competed for over 50 years.

“There is a unity with nature,” she said. “When you ride this wave you realize that nature is in full control and that you are kind of a guest. This wave could knock you over at any time. Mastering it is a challenge because it is unpredictable.

Stewart was also good enough at tennis to earn a scholarship to the University of Florida, where his studies did not give way to athletics.

Stewart obtained bachelor’s degrees in French, Spanish and education.

Later, she added a master’s degree in psychology, a doctorate in economics, and a law degree.

“I tend to move fast and not get much sleep,” said Stewart. “I’ve always been like that.

While at the University of Florida, Stewart stayed with Jane Slagsvol, singer and songwriter Jimmy Buffett’s second wife.

“They are some of my oldest friends,” said Stewart.

She described the man who made “Margaritaville” famous “as a great guy and a great trader.”

When he’s not playing, “he’s a pretty normal person,” said Stewart. “He’s the one who turns the pancakes for the kids on Sunday mornings.”

Prior to founding Stewart and Associates, Stewart taught high school French and Spanish for a year in the late 1960s.

One of her biggest disappointments in this profession, she said, was discovering that men were paid “25 to 30 percent more” than women.

That’s why, when Stewart learned that there might be a job opportunity at a large company, she decided to explore a new career.

The husband of a neighbor of the apartment complex where she lived at the time had been promoted to a managerial position at Xerox.

His wife told Stewart that she should talk to him because the company “was considering hiring women.”

Stewart did and was encouraged.

“Some things he said resonated with me,” Stewart recalls. “One was that selling is just teaching people about your product, so if you can teach you can sell. But the most important thing he said was that everyone would be paid based on the number of copiers sold. If you sold more copiers than anyone else, you were going to get paid more than anyone else. It started my 15 year career at Xerox.

From a sales position, she rose through the ranks to become vice president of the company’s South East region.

“For a few years, I was part of the internal legal team,” said Stewart. “I was a copyright infringement lawyer. Yes, we have sued people for saying, “Leave us Xerox.” Most of them have settled down.

Because Stewart was also involved in strategic planning, she knew when Xerox would become most important to executives and cut expenses.

Additionally, the company wanted her to move to Rochester, New York, and Stewart was reluctant.

“They gave us an early exit option that was really, really good,” she said, and so Stewart went on her own and created Stewart and Associates.

Today, she is too busy to spend much time remembering what she has accomplished.

“I hang out with a lot of young people who are doing exciting things, and I’m happy to be a part of and help them,” she said. “I’ve never been the type of person to just sit there and do nothing. It would drive me crazy. “


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DSG confirms new student organizations and reviews funding for arts groups at Wednesday meeting https://avvensanchea.com/dsg-confirms-new-student-organizations-and-reviews-funding-for-arts-groups-at-wednesday-meeting/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 04:18:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/dsg-confirms-new-student-organizations-and-reviews-funding-for-arts-groups-at-wednesday-meeting/ The Duke Student Government Senate held its second meeting on Wednesday this academic year, confirming committee candidates, updating student organization finance committee policy, and awarding and recognizing organizations. Pro Tempore Senate Speaker Devan Desai, a junior, made announcements about the upcoming elections. Nominations for the first-year elections are due the night of September 6 and […]]]>

The Duke Student Government Senate held its second meeting on Wednesday this academic year, confirming committee candidates, updating student organization finance committee policy, and awarding and recognizing organizations.

Pro Tempore Senate Speaker Devan Desai, a junior, made announcements about the upcoming elections. Nominations for the first-year elections are due the night of September 6 and nominations for the general elections are due the following week, September 10.

Senators nominated and confirmed candidates for vacancies on the Financial Oversight and Appeals Committee, the Facilities and Environment Committee, and the Elections Board. They also confirmed the existing candidates for the Arts Council.

OCGC President Drew Flanagan, a junior, presented a policy update for clubs seeking funding for craft activities. As part of the proposed update, the policy allows funding for one-time supplies, but reduces the per capita funding allocation from $ 10 to $ 5.

Flanagan said surveys of arts organizations showed the existing funding was too much. This, combined with previous changes that restricted purchases of reusable items with OCGC funds, resulted in a decrease in the allocation. Senators subsequently confirmed the update.

In other cases

Senators introduced two new additions to their weekly meetings. The public comment section, starting September 8, will allow members of the Duke community to bring their concerns or questions directly to DSG, and the project roundtable will allow Senators from different committees to share their knowledge. on various projects and committees to better inform senators. of the ongoing activities of the DSG.

The DSG also created clubs which did not meet the deadlines of the previous academic year. They created the Duke Arab Student Organization, a cultural organization for the Arab community, and Our Urban Future, an organization focused on urban planning and design.

Additionally, senators confirmed recognition from the American Physician Scientists Association, a branch of a national organization that seeks to combine clinical and scientific fields for those seeking a double doctorate (MD-PhD).

“There are a lot of groups on campus that attract students interested in medicine or science, but to my knowledge none attract students interested in both,” said junior Julia Gardner.

Senators presented recognition from Duke Grassroots, an environmental organization involved in soil and water conservation in the local community of Durham, due to redundancy concerns and a need for better information about the nature of the club .

Flanagan spoke to Senators and Deputy Chairs at DSG to encourage clubs to stay the course with their events rather than canceling. He said the restrictions on clubs due to COVID-19 are not the same as last academic year and that funding will be available for food and other event-related expenses as long as events are registered. and in accordance with Duke’s policies on al fresco dining.


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Knoxville organization educating the community on how to become foster parents https://avvensanchea.com/knoxville-organization-educating-the-community-on-how-to-become-foster-parents/ Sun, 29 Aug 2021 03:35:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/knoxville-organization-educating-the-community-on-how-to-become-foster-parents/ KNOXVILLE, Tennessee (WVLT) – On Saturday, many had the opportunity to learn more about adoption, fostering and helping vulnerable children at a conference hosted by the Knoxville Area Foster Care and Adoption Ministries (KAFCAM). KAFCAM hosted its sixth annual regional adoption and foster care conference at First Baptist Knoxville. Those attending the conference were able […]]]>

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee (WVLT) – On Saturday, many had the opportunity to learn more about adoption, fostering and helping vulnerable children at a conference hosted by the Knoxville Area Foster Care and Adoption Ministries (KAFCAM).

KAFCAM hosted its sixth annual regional adoption and foster care conference at First Baptist Knoxville.

Those attending the conference were able to enjoy learning sessions on the basics of international and domestic adoption and how to prepare your family and marriage before welcoming or adopting them.

Speaking as a former young foster family at the conference, Reagan Dodson shared his story of growing up in foster homes and why foster families are important.

“If something pulls someone’s heart or they feel there’s a call to be a foster parent, but they’re just hesitating, go for it. Having a really great host family is what really got me through it all and allowed me to be as successful as I am now, ”Dodson shared.

Dodson says she and her younger sister were able to stay together in several foster homes as they grew up.

Michael Clark with KAFCAM says nearly 9,000 children are in need of foster homes in Tennessee, with hundreds here in Knoxville.

“Here in County Knox we see there are almost 800 (children). There are a lot of variables and reasons, but in reality the consequences are addictions and trauma and things that just happened in our community. Children often feel the effect, ”said Clark.

For those who were unable to attend the conference, you can find more information on becoming a foster parent or adopting a child on the KAFCAM website.

Copyright 2021 WVLT. All rights reserved.


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