Community Organization – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 02:21:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://avvensanchea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6.png Community Organization – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ 32 32 After Fatal Crash, Charlottesville Residents Want Fifth Street Changes | local government https://avvensanchea.com/after-fatal-crash-charlottesville-residents-want-fifth-street-changes-local-government/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/after-fatal-crash-charlottesville-residents-want-fifth-street-changes-local-government/ After several fatal car crashes on Fifth Street leading to Charlottesville, community members are pushing the city to do more to keep it safe. Seven people have been killed in road accidents over the past six years. More recently, a woman from Richmond, whose name has not yet been released, was killed in a traffic […]]]>

After several fatal car crashes on Fifth Street leading to Charlottesville, community members are pushing the city to do more to keep it safe.

Seven people have been killed in road accidents over the past six years. More recently, a woman from Richmond, whose name has not yet been released, was killed in a traffic accident on New Years Day.

Four people were killed in 2020 in crashes on Fifth Street. Rahmean Rose, 23, was killed in a motorcycle collision and Dustin Parr, 30, was killed in a reckless driving accident. Devin Stinnie, 28, and Rashod Walton, 23, were killed in a car crash later that year.

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Eric Betthauser, 43, a music teacher at Western Albemarle High and Henley Middle schools, was killed by a drunk driver in 2016. Quintus Brooks, 20, was killed in an accident in 2018.

“Fifth Street is a dangerous road, and it has been for decades and decades. And we want it to be safe. People have been asking for this road to be made safer for many, many years,” Matthew said. Gillikin of Livable Cville, a community organization that advocates for affordable housing, public transportation, and cycling/walking infrastructure in Charlottesville.

The group recently held a rally to demand safety improvements, including slower speed limits after the fatal New Year’s Day crash. He continues to pressure the city council and staff to make changes.

Gillikin said the rally was well attended by people living near the streets and supported by family members of people killed in street crashes.

“The changes we’re asking for are modest,” Gillikin said. “Will the city set aside money to actually slow down, make structural changes to traffic? I hate that this hasn’t been addressed for so long. But that’s what’s going to have to happen with the city.

Liveable Cville is asking the city to make three changes to Fifth Street: reduce the speed limit from 45 to 40 mph, install advanced intersection warning signs, and make signal improvements. These are all based on recommendations offered to City Council by City Traffic Engineer Brennen Duncan in November 2020.

Duncan said his recommendation to reduce the speed limit by five miles per hour was determined by reviewing speed and crash data for the corridor.

“The majority of drivers obey the speed limit, but there are a significant number of bumper and bumper type things and reducing the speed limit by five miles an hour can help [fix] that,” Duncan said. “Before this most recent death, everyone else who really had nothing to do with the posted speed limit or anything like that, they were all reckless drivers or under the influence. There is not much we can do as traffic engineers to completely eliminate this. »

This is where bigger changes need to come in, Duncan said, including the ability to create roundabouts at some intersections.

“You can drive recklessly on any street, but there are very few streets in the city that are as wide and straight and long as Fifth Street, and so it lends itself to if someone wants to drive recklessly, he can take it up to some pretty crazy reckless speeds,” Duncan said.

“On a normal city street, with parking on both sides, reckless driving can lead to 50 miles per hour. On Fifth Street, reckless driving occurs at the 90 to 100 mph threshold,” a he said. “That’s where this roundabout idea would come in and try to put something in the middle of that hallway to cut it off, so it’s not a mile long right away. “

According to Deputy City Manager Sam Sanders, the city is actively working to improve road safety.

At a recent city council meeting, Sanders said city staff were pursuing a reduction in the speed limit and planned to bring the issue to council at an upcoming meeting.

Sanders said the city also ordered flashing signs warning of upcoming traffic lights, but said supply chain issues delayed their arrival. He said the city is considering making additional improvements to the traffic light at the intersection of Cherry Avenue and Elliott Avenue.

“We recognize that these are small, really temporary fixes. They’re not necessarily big enough to prevent the various tragedies that have happened,” Sanders said. “But we know we know at this point that breaking the street is the most effective and expensive improvement, of course.”

Councilor Michael Payne said in an email to the Daily Progress that he supported adding roundabouts.

“Our biggest opportunity to do this is probably through VDOT’s Smart Scale process, which could provide us with significant public funds to make safety improvements,” Payne said. “I plan to ensure that Fifth Street is discussed as a priority during this process and encourage anyone in the community interested in this issue to get involved.”

Payne said the city has received more than $14 million from Smart Scale for safety and pedestrian improvements over the past few years in nearby corridors. He said there “could be a real opportunity to achieve our goals through this process.”

Councilor Juandiego Wade said he supports continued funding for these improvements.

“Some of them [changes] may have to allocate money for these improvements. I was a transport planner for many years for [Albemarle County] so I know there may be opportunities for some security funds. We need to look at all possible options to deal with it,” Wade said.

A major route change will take both money and time, as well as council support.

“[Safety on Fifth Street] has been an issue that Sanders has taken very seriously since his early days in the city,” Councilman Sena Magill said in an email. “The loss of life that has been suffered is tragic and the city does not turn a blind eye. However, the government, in general, does not act quickly.

Duncan said while some of the short-term projects like traffic signs are underway, some of the larger projects will need the city council’s blessing.

“These are in the council court, if they want to go ahead with this. We kind of need direction and funding,” Duncan said.

Duncan said he met Sanders following the latest crash. He said they plan to conduct further study over the next six months and gather public feedback as well.

“With any of the options that we want to do, there are going to be pretty significant pros and cons. And so, as a community, we have to figure out what level of traffic we might be willing to deal with,” said said Duncan.

Gillikin pointed out that several of those killed in crashes along Fifth Street were people of color.

“Traffic, cycling and pedestrian safety issues are a matter of fairness. They have a disproportionate impact on black and brown people. And I think we’ve seen both who were victims of the crashes that happened there, but also who lives next to the road,” Gillikin said, noting that a large subsidized apartment complex , Greenstone at 5th, is adjacent to the road.

“They are mostly African American, Hispanic and refugee families, and they are impacted by noise pollution, air pollution,” he said. “It’s a matter of fairness to make this road safer, not only for the people who drive it, but also for the people who live on it.”

The city recently launched a new application process for roadside memorials, sparked by the Brooks family’s request to place a “Drive Safely” memorial sign on Fifth Street. Sanders mentioned it during the city council meeting as motivation to solve the problem.

“I visited two other families who have lost loved ones over the years. And I heard their requests to intervene and I’ve been working on it since I’ve been here. These meetings were meant to commemorate their loved ones with markers. And that, to me, is the motivation that we need to continue to focus on getting the kinds of improvements along that corridor as soon as possible,” Sanders said.

“Fifth Street is a dangerous road, and it has been for decades and decades. And we want it to be safe. People have been asking for this road to be made safer for many, many years,” Matthew said. Gillikin of Liveable Cville.

Fix Fifth Street

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collaboration in action: the UN and Girl Scouts | News https://avvensanchea.com/collaboration-in-action-the-un-and-girl-scouts-news/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 07:10:59 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/collaboration-in-action-the-un-and-girl-scouts-news/ When it comes to life-changing experiences for young women, it’s hard to beat the opportunities offered by Girl Scouts. Girl Scouts has been providing educational, leadership, and community engagement experiences for young women in Nebraska since 1926. Today, Girl Scouts Spirit of Nebraska (GSSN) serves more than 10,000 girls of all ages, backgrounds and of […]]]>

When it comes to life-changing experiences for young women, it’s hard to beat the opportunities offered by Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts has been providing educational, leadership, and community engagement experiences for young women in Nebraska since 1926. Today, Girl Scouts Spirit of Nebraska (GSSN) serves more than 10,000 girls of all ages, backgrounds and of all communities.

As Nebraska’s urban university since 1908, UNO has grown alongside GSSN, working collaboratively to achieve greater impact than any one organization could alone:

“Find” a place

In 2014, the Barbara Weitz Community Engagement Center (CEC) welcomed GSSN as a Community Building Partner, which meant the organization was able to have physical space on campus and all the benefits that come with it.

“We’ve been able to leverage our presence at the CEC to create partnerships with other not-for-profit organizations housed there,” says Lisa Hiatt, GSSN’s Chief Operating Officer. “We were also able to use our time at CEC to recruit students at the UN to volunteer with the girls and also hire students as summer camp staff.”

The space has also allowed the organization to hold annual meetings and celebrations for volunteers and staff; and provided access to the UN Libraries’ collection of books, journals and media.

“UNO just provided us with so many resources and gave us such visibility in the wider community,” says Shannon Peterson, GSSN’s Chief Marketing Officer. “It was a very valuable partnership for us.”

A powerful education pipeline

Access to the UN campus goes far beyond the staff and volunteers working for the GSSN – it includes the thousands of Girl Scouts they serve.

For more than a decade, the director of the UN Center for Mathematics and Science Learning has worked with the GSSN to deliver “The Magic of Chemistry” – a multi-day workshop for students in grades four to the eighth year where UNO students go through practical science. lessons ranging from chemical analyzes of drinking water to examining the pigments that make up a candy-coated shell for an M&M.

“Working with the university is perfect for them because we have the equipment, the human power and the expertise,” says Dana Richter-Egger, director of the Math-Science Learning Center. “And working with the Girl Scouts is great for our students because they get needed volunteer hours and they also really appreciate the commitment and the experience of it all.”

The program, which Richter-Egger inspired from his own experience facilitating a similar effort while earning his doctorate, is also having lasting impacts.

“Anytime we can get girls to a college campus, that’s a win,” says Lori Williamson, program manager for GSSN. “They’re starting to see the possibilities and it’s getting them to start imagining themselves going to college. They’re realizing that it’s doable for them.

Out of this world experiences

As part of Omaha’s STEM Ecosystem, STEM TRAIL Center, and NE STEM 4U, focused on science, technology, engineering, and math, UNO students, faculty, and staff have builds infrastructure to support groups like the GSSN.

For Krista Testin, planetarium operator UNO’ Mallory Kuntze, this connection is extremely personal. Her daughter is a scout and she is also a troop leader for the GSSN.

Testin’s role with the UN Planetarium and as a troop leader has been extremely beneficial to both the GSSN and the UN, with the UN bringing in hundreds of girls in a normal year for planetarium shows to help them earn badges. She has also been invited to be a guest speaker at GSSN events and to host conferences throughout the state – and beyond – as a representative of the UN.

In fact, in 2018 Testin worked with GSSN on a grant to develop astronomy clubs in their state. As a result, she was lucky enough to travel to NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, which led to the start of a Girl Scout astronomy club called “Beyond Our World” which, in turn, led even more Girl Scouts from across the state. from Nebraska to engage with the UN Planetarium in person as well as virtually.

“A lot of people when they get to high school say they don’t like math or they don’t want to do a carpentry shop or they don’t want to take agriculture classes. . But if we can get them started early and really get them interested, who knows what they will be,” says Testin, “STEM isn’t just engineers and you’re not just working with numbers in a cubicle, but you can interact and make it a better world and a better place for those around you.

stay active

Having existed for almost a century, it’s no surprise that among the more than 118,000 living alumni of the UN, there are more than a few with ties to the Girl Scouts, and the GSSN. specifically.

Currently, several former UN members are on staff at the GSSN and until last November, the GSSN was led by former UN member Fran Marshall, who recently left the organization after 14 years at the helm. organisation.

Marshall earned two degrees from UNO: a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and a Masters of Business Administration. But as the saying goes, once a Maverick, always a Maverick.

After graduating, Marshall remained involved on campus while working at First National Bank of Omaha, working closely with the UNO Alumni Association and Claussen-Leahy Run/Walk.

She was also inducted into the UNO College of Business Administration Hall of Fame in 1997.

Marshall says the UN and GSSN have been partners for decades thanks to strong ties and experiences between the two organizations far beyond educational or volunteer experiences, including partnering with UNO Athletics to attend women’s basketball games; Mammel Hall serving as host for artVenture, a multi-day fundraising event and art auction; and have several service-learning courses to meet the needs of the GSSN.

“College has impacted us all in meaningful and life-changing ways,” she says.

A joint mission to give back

One of the most important roles within the GSSN organization is serving on its Board of Directors.

Board members included UN alumni as well as UN faculty and staff. Angela Batson, program evaluator for the UN’s Office of Support and Training for Program Evaluation (STEPS), joined the board as a full member in 2020.

“I think when people can see board members working in different places and they’re not necessarily the deans and the presidents and CEOs of things. I think it shows that you can be a leader in your community, regardless of your job or social position. You can choose to give back at any time at any level.

In her role, Batson provides advisory support, but also helps build important connections between the GSSN and community partners like the UN, as well as making sure parents – especially during COVID – know what opportunities exist for their children.

A former Girl Scout herself, Batson says being on the board has allowed her to see all the different ways the UN intersects with the mission of the GSSN, and what that has meant for the organization. organization.

“People sometimes feel like universities are away from communities and are very formal and that you’re not connected on the ground or in the world – but that’s not the case.”

Cooperation in action

For decades, the UN and GSSN have worked together to not only support each other, but to support generations of students across Nebraska.

Whether it’s the UNO providing on-campus resources, the GSSN enabling young women to see themselves as university students, service-learning projects bringing together current UNO students with future NOU students who are also Girl Scouts, graduating graduates who lead the GSSN or work closely in support of its mission, there’s no denying the impact these two organizations have had on each other – and on those that they serve.

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Al Mezan: The international community must demand that Israel lift restrictions on Palestinian patients’ access to hospitals and medical care outside of Gaza – Occupied Palestinian Territory https://avvensanchea.com/al-mezan-the-international-community-must-demand-that-israel-lift-restrictions-on-palestinian-patients-access-to-hospitals-and-medical-care-outside-of-gaza-occupied-palestinian-territory/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 10:03:57 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/al-mezan-the-international-community-must-demand-that-israel-lift-restrictions-on-palestinian-patients-access-to-hospitals-and-medical-care-outside-of-gaza-occupied-palestinian-territory/ On January 9, 2022, at around 1 p.m., medical sources at the Palestine Medical Complex in Ramallah announced the death of 16-year-old Gaza resident Salim Mohammed al-Nawati from complications from leukemia. Al-Nawati was diagnosed at Al-Rantisi Specialist Hospital in Gaza and, due to the lack of treatment available in the Strip, was referred by the […]]]>

On January 9, 2022, at around 1 p.m., medical sources at the Palestine Medical Complex in Ramallah announced the death of 16-year-old Gaza resident Salim Mohammed al-Nawati from complications from leukemia. Al-Nawati was diagnosed at Al-Rantisi Specialist Hospital in Gaza and, due to the lack of treatment available in the Strip, was referred by the Ministry of Health to Al-Najah National University Hospital in Nablus. Al-Nawati scheduled an appointment for November 24, 2021, but was prevented from leaving Gaza by Israeli authorities. His family made another appointment and resubmitted the travel permit application, which is a mandatory and discriminatory measure imposed by the Israeli authorities on all Palestinian patients who need to leave Gaza for treatment. The patient missed three hospital appointments due to Israel’s late responses to his requests, and was finally granted an exit permit on December 26, 2021.

Israel’s practice of delaying the issuance of exit permits until the hospital appointment has passed is a common occurrence for patients in Gaza, who consequently complain of worsening of their state of health and reduced chances of recovery. Al Mezan documentation shows that between 2017 and 2021, 63 patients – including eight children and 22 women – died after Israeli authorities denied them access to hospitals and medical care outside the Gaza Strip .

Despite the important role played by the Department of Foreign Referrals of the Ministry of Health, many patients in the Gaza Strip complain of delays in obtaining medical referrals and financial coverage. Patients who are in their final stages of treatment and who have been referred for years are also reporting delays in renewing their referrals, and they fear their recovery will be affected.

Al Mezan mourns, with the Al-Nawati family, the death of their child, and calls on the international community to urge Israel to stop obstructing patient access to hospitals in the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and to the inside the Green Line. Israel must also fully and unconditionally lift its illegal closure and blockade, which, among its restrictions, prevents the entry of necessary diagnostic and therapeutic devices into Gaza and the freedom of movement of patients.

Authorities must investigate Al-Nawati’s death, particularly the procedures followed by the foreign referral service, as Al Mezan was informed that the child was being referred to hospitals including the Ministry of Health knows that they do not receive such cases, either because of the debts accumulated on the Ministry itself or because they are non-specialized hospitals. Al-Najah Hospital and Palestine Medical Complex both refused to admit the child, which is unjustified. The process the patient went through on the Palestinian side requires investigation.

Al Mezan reiterates the need to localize health services and invest in building the capacity of public and private hospitals in the Gaza Strip to prevent further suffering for patients, while reducing costs. Al Mezan calls on the international community, the World Health Organization and other health and medical organizations to work to modernize hospitals in Gaza and equip them with the necessary equipment to enable them to provide medical care to patients with cancer and other patients with serious illnesses.

Ultimately, the occupying power is responsible for guaranteeing the right to health. The barriers are numerous and the complex permit regime must be dismantled.

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Community-led projects receive gaming grants https://avvensanchea.com/community-led-projects-receive-gaming-grants/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 16:32:17 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/community-led-projects-receive-gaming-grants/ People of all ages and abilities in communities across the province will benefit from improvements to nonprofit programs and services through capital project funding from the Community Gaming Grants program. “The pandemic has highlighted the critical need and created a growing demand for the types of services that non-profit organizations provide to the people of […]]]>

People of all ages and abilities in communities across the province will benefit from improvements to nonprofit programs and services through capital project funding from the Community Gaming Grants program.

“The pandemic has highlighted the critical need and created a growing demand for the types of services that non-profit organizations provide to the people of British Columbia. These organizations are working hard to raise funds to purchase equipment and make renovations that create more inclusive and accessible spaces like transition and recovery homes, elevators and universal washrooms,” said Josie Osborne, Minister of Municipal Affairs. “Our government is committed to investing in not-for-profit organizations by supporting their efforts to help people thrive in healthy and vibrant communities.

The Community Gaming Grants program provided $5 million to 45 nonprofit groups for capital projects in 2021-22. The funding will be used to help local organizations upgrade their facilities and community infrastructure, update technology, and purchase vehicles and equipment for the programs.

Here are some examples of funded projects:

  • a new elevator and universal washroom at ArtStarts in Schools in Vancouver so members have better, more accessible amenities;
  • remodeling Aunt Leah’s original home so that more mothers and their children have shelter and services;
  • a renovation of the Foundry Langley Inclusive Gathering Space building so youth can better access inclusive gathering spaces;
  • the construction of a post-treatment recovery house for the Lillooet Friendship Center so that adults in need can have more support to boost their addiction recovery and general well-being; and
  • replacement of the Otter Point Boardwalk for Williams Lake Field Naturalists so people can access a more flood resistant and wheelchair accessible boardwalk.

The province continues to prioritize capital projects through 2021-22 to support not-for-profit organizations facing increased demand for services during the pandemic. Many organizations will also use funds to make changes that support physical distancing and other measures to ensure they adhere to public health and safety guidelines.

“The Aunt Leah Foundation is thrilled to receive this critical funding for the reconstruction of Aunt Leah’s original home where, more than 35 years ago, the organization began providing housing and supported services to mothers at risk of losing custody of their children,” Jacqueline said. Dupuis, CEO of the Aunt Leah Foundation. “In 2020, Aunt Leah provided safe housing and security for 25 mothers and children, and Aunt Leah’s new home will increase our ability to help keep families together and achieve independence.”

The Community Gaming Grants program has made it a condition that all grants through 2021-22 comply with provincial health orders, and the program provides organizations with the ability to delay the delivery of projects and services until they can do so safely.

Quote:

Lawrie Portigal, Vice President, BC Association for Charitable Gaming –

“Supporting capital infrastructure has always been a critical component for many nonprofits, especially during these challenging times. I congratulate the successful applicants and applaud the gaming industry and the provincial government for providing this opportunity for groups to access much-needed funding for critical capital projects that are critical to the recovery and the sustainability of the sector.

Niki Sharma, Parliamentary Secretary for Community Development and Nonprofit Organizations –

“Funding from the Community Gaming Grants program is essential for non-profit organizations to continue the important work that is enabling people and communities across British Columbia to recover from the pandemic.

Fast facts:

  • The full list of Capital Projects Sector recipients is available here: https://news.gov.bc.ca/files/CGG_Capital_Project_Grants_21-22.pdf
  • Since 2017, Capital Projects sector grants have helped 332 nonprofits in 110 communities purchase equipment and make renovations essential to their operations.
  • Each year, revenue from commercial gaming funds essential government programs and services, including health care, education, justice and social services throughout British Columbia.
    • Up to $140 million in gaming revenue benefits communities through the 5,000 organizations the Community Gaming Grants program supports each year, with $5 million dedicated to funding the capital projects sector.
    • Community Gaming Grants provide funding to arts and culture groups, sports, environment, public safety, human and social services, and parent advisory councils in BC schools.
  • Each year, eligible organizations can apply for one sector grant for a capital project, in addition to one of the six regular community game grant sectors.

Learn more:

For more information on how the Community Gaming Grants program is responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, visit: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/sports-culture/gambling-fundraising/gaming -grants/cggupdates

StrongerBC: https://strongerbc.gov.bc.ca/

For updates on the COVID-19 pandemic and the government’s response, visit: www.gov.bc.ca/covid19

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CAIR Condemns Texas Synagogue Hostage Taking and Works with Local Community Leaders to Learn More and Provide Assistance https://avvensanchea.com/cair-condemns-texas-synagogue-hostage-taking-and-works-with-local-community-leaders-to-learn-more-and-provide-assistance/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 23:10:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/cair-condemns-texas-synagogue-hostage-taking-and-works-with-local-community-leaders-to-learn-more-and-provide-assistance/ WASHINGTON, January 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the nation’s largest Muslim advocacy and civil rights organization, condemned today’s hostage taking at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville, TX, and said he was in contact with local community leaders to learn more about the attack and provide any assistance possible. SEE: Colleyville […]]]>

WASHINGTON, January 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the nation’s largest Muslim advocacy and civil rights organization, condemned today’s hostage taking at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville, TX, and said he was in contact with local community leaders to learn more about the attack and provide any assistance possible.

SEE: Colleyville a synagogue held hostage during a live-streamed service; the police negotiate with the man

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/crime/article257360862.html

In a report, Deputy National Director of CAIR Edward Ahmed Mitchell noted:

“We strongly condemn the hostage-taking at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville, TX. This latest anti-Semitic attack on a place of worship is an unacceptable act of evil. We stand in solidarity with the Jewish community and pray that law enforcement can quickly and safely release the hostages. No cause can justify or excuse this crime. We are in contact with local community leaders to find out more and provide any assistance we can.”

CAIR’s mission is to protect civil rights, enhance understanding of Islam, promote justice, and empower American Muslims.

CAIR’s mission is to protect civil liberties, improve understanding of Islam, promote justice, and empower Muslim women in the Estados Unidos.

Become a CAIR fan on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/CAIRNational
Subscribe to the CAIR mailing list
https://action.cair.com/a/newsletters
Subscribe to CAIR’s Twitter feed
http://twitter.com/cairnational
Subscribe to the CAIR YouTube channel
http://www.youtube.com/cairtv
Follow CAIR on Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/cair_national/
Donate to CAIR
https://action.cair.com/a/donate

Do you like reading CAIR’s press releases and participating in our action alerts? You can help contribute to CAIR’s work advocating for civil rights and empowering American Muslims across the country by making a one-time contribution or becoming a monthly donor. Supporters like you make CAIR’s advocacy work possible and make the fight against Islamophobia an achievable goal. Click here to donate to CAIR.

If you would like to join CAIR’s media list, please sign up here: https://action.cair.com/a/newsletters — For more information, email: [email protected], CC [email protected]

CONTACT: Deputy National Director of CAIR Edward Ahmed Mitchell, 404-285-9530, [email protected]; Executive Director of CAIR-Dallas Faizan Syed, [email protected], 469-290-2909, CAIR-Houston Director of Operations William White, [email protected], 713-838-2247; CAIR Director of Government Affairs Robert McCaw, 202-742-6448, [email protected]; CAIR National Director of Communications Ibrahim Hooper, 202-744-7726, [email protected]; CAIR National Communications Coordinator Ismail Allison, 202-770-6280, [email protected]

SOURCE Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR)

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Grants Available to Local Communities for Main Street Revitalization | Hometown focus https://avvensanchea.com/grants-available-to-local-communities-for-main-street-revitalization-hometown-focus/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 08:00:48 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/grants-available-to-local-communities-for-main-street-revitalization-hometown-focus/ REGIONAL – The Northland Foundation is seeking input from communities in northeast Minnesota who want to be part of a Main Street economic revitalization program. Northland could serve as a fiscal agent on behalf of area communities to tap into a second round of statewide funds made available for projects in the area. If awarded […]]]>

REGIONAL – The Northland Foundation is seeking input from communities in northeast Minnesota who want to be part of a Main Street economic revitalization program. Northland could serve as a fiscal agent on behalf of area communities to tap into a second round of statewide funds made available for projects in the area.

If awarded a state grant, the Northland Foundation could provide grants or guaranteed loans to communities in the area to cover a significant portion of project costs related to:

• Repair or renovation of
real estate
• Building construction
• Landscaping and street design • Demolition and construction site
preperation
• Pre-design and design

• Engineering
• Infrastructure
• Related Site Amenities
Eligibility requirements
within communities include
but are not limited to:
• Major plant closures,
important business
the vacancy increases, and/or
loss of economic anchorage
establishments
• Impacts of COVID-19 on
travel, tourism, retail and
accommodation
• Extended property
damage due to fire, flood,
arson, civil disorder and/or
natural disasters

Regional success

The Virginia Community Foundation applied in the first round of funding and received $1,794,100. The foundation will in turn provide grants to businesses in the city of Virginia’s trade corridors to support economic recovery from widespread damage from the fires and impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Information sessions

Local elected officials and members of an EDA or other community organization can attend one of two sessions to explore the possibility of being part of the second round of funding for the Main Street Economic Revitalization Grant. The Northland Foundation looks forward to helping communities across the region tap into this funding.

• Wednesday January 19,
10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Join via
Zoom into us06web.
zoom.us/j/88694140856#-
Success.
• Friday 21 January 10 –
11:30 a.m. Join via Zoom
at us02web.zoom.
us/j/2322588835#success.

An in-person option is available for the Jan. 21 meeting, which will be held at the Range Association of Municipalities and Schools (RAMS), 5525 Emerald Ave., Mountain Iron. Pre-register by emailing michael@northlandfdn.org.

To learn more about Minnesota’s Main Street Revitalization Program, go to www. mn.gov/act.

Source: The Ranger, a publication of Iron Range Resources & Rehabilitation.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Observance Day Welcomes New Officers and Board Members https://avvensanchea.com/martin-luther-king-jr-observance-day-welcomes-new-officers-and-board-members/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 14:37:55 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/martin-luther-king-jr-observance-day-welcomes-new-officers-and-board-members/ As a community organization, the King Association is governed by a Board of Directors chosen by its members. We are happy to share that we have elected new offices. Several people were re-elected as members of the Council. Their continued service to the Board of Directors will help the association change our community as we […]]]>

As a community organization, the King Association is governed by a Board of Directors chosen by its members. We are happy to share that we have elected new offices. Several people were re-elected as members of the Council. Their continued service to the Board of Directors will help the association change our community as we strive to continue working in memory of Dr. King to end injustice and make our world a better place.

Our mission is to serve our fellow human beings and to ensure that Dr. King’s goal of eradicating poverty and injustice wins.

We are delighted to welcome the following leaders: Ms. Deborah Adams, President; Ms. Carrie R. Howard, Vice-President; Justice LeRoy Burke III, Secretary; Ms. Judee Jones, Financial Secretary; and Ms. Grace Jones Miles, Treasurer. Ms. LexAnn West was elected as a new member of the Board of Directors. The members who were re-elected are: Dr Carol Williams Brown, Msgr Raphael Watson, Ms Rosabel P. Dixon. Ms. Inez Jenkins has been granted Board Member Emeritus status and Ms. Carolyn S. Blackshear will become President Emeritus. Thank you to everyone who serves on the Board of Directors and we look forward to working together to advance the mission of the association.

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New adult coloring book showcases Asheville community gardens, showcases local talent, and connects residents to food resources https://avvensanchea.com/new-adult-coloring-book-showcases-asheville-community-gardens-showcases-local-talent-and-connects-residents-to-food-resources/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 14:29:24 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/new-adult-coloring-book-showcases-asheville-community-gardens-showcases-local-talent-and-connects-residents-to-food-resources/ Reducing stress is part of a healthy lifestyle. Adult coloring books are one of the latest trends to help. Thanks to a collaboration between Asheville Parks and Recreation, area nonprofits and agencies, and local artists, residents can connect with food resources and learn more about community gardens through the beautifully illustrated pages of a new […]]]>

Reducing stress is part of a healthy lifestyle. Adult coloring books are one of the latest trends to help. Thanks to a collaboration between Asheville Parks and Recreation, area nonprofits and agencies, and local artists, residents can connect with food resources and learn more about community gardens through the beautifully illustrated pages of a new coloring book for adults, In the garden.

“The town of Asheville received a grant from National Association of Recreation and Parks to promote local resources and provide nutrition education and community gardening opportunities, ”said Kim Kennedy, director of the Stephen-Lee Community Center. “We worked with other community organizations on innovative ways to use the grant. The Buncombe County Council on Aging came up with the idea of ​​creating an adult coloring book featuring interpretations of community gardens by artists and storytellers in the Asheville area.

In the garden highlights 10 gardens and provides information on how to volunteer, find food and meal venues, and connect with resources to alleviate food insecurity. Fifteen artists have created pieces to represent garden locations, some of which share a personal story. As such, the artistic styles depicted in the coloring book are varied. Biographies and contact details for each artist are also included.

As places of trusted gathering, parks and recreation agencies are uniquely suited to serve as centers of community wellness, connecting every member of the community to essential programs, services, and spaces that advance equity. health, improve health outcomes and improve quality of life, ”said Maureen Neuman, senior program manager for the National Recreation and Park Association. “We are proud to support the work of Asheville Parks & Recreation as it acts as a community nutrition center, ensuring all members of the community have increased access to fresh, local foods through community gardens, support for SNAP and WIC services and nutrition. educational opportunities.

Asheville Community Gardens are public spaces where neighbors find common ground while demonstrating a commitment to the shared mountain spirit and sustainability. Some volunteer weekly, others volunteer once a year. Typically, food collected is shared among volunteers, with the excess going to local pantries and nonprofits connecting resources to neighbors in need of healthy fruits and vegetables. The NRPA grant has so far been used to create two new gardens, in the East End / Valley Street neighborhood and at the Burton Street Community Center.

Free copies of In the garden are available at Community centers through the city. A PDF of the book and a food resource map are available at www.ashevillenc.gov/parks under the “The well-beingtab “.

Artists contributing to the adult coloring book include Jami Allen, Robyn Baxter, Julie Becker, Annie Kyla Bennett, Hannah Bunzey, Erika Busse, Sam Fontaine, Jina Mendez Martin, Ryan O’Sullivan, Stephanie Peterson Jones, Jenny Pickens, Karine Rupp -Stanko, Elizabeth Somerville, Tricia Tripp and Nicole Leigh Yates. Project collaborators with the City of Asheville include Buncombe County, Bountiful Cities, Buncombe County Council on Aging, MANNA FoodBank, United Way of Asheville and Buncombe County and the YMCA of West West North Carolina.

If you are food insecure, connect with resources by dialing 2-1-1 from any phone or by visiting www.nc211.org.

About Asheville Parks and Recreation

Created in 1954, the Asheville Parks and Recreationn Department manages a unique collection of over 55 public parks, playgrounds and open spaces throughout the city in a system that also includes comprehensive recreation centers, swimming pools, Asheville Municipal Golf Course, WNC Nature Center, Riverside Cemetery, athletic fields and courts, and community centers that offer a variety of wellness, educational and cultural programs for Ashevillians of all ages. With 8 miles of paved greenways and numerous natural surface trails, its comprehensive portfolio serves as the basis for a vibrant hub for Asheville residents to connect with their neighbors and explore the natural beauty of a livable town and pedestrian.

Driven by the promise that Asheville is a better, safer place where everyone from infants to retirees has the opportunity to be supported, healthy and successful, Asheville Parks & Recreation was the first municipal service of nationally accredited recreation in the United States. For more information visit www.ashevillenc.org/parcs.

About the National Association of Recreation and Parks

The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) is the leading nonprofit organization dedicated to building strong, vibrant and resilient communities through the power of parks and recreation. With over 60,000 members, NRPA advances this mission by investing in and championing the work of parks and recreation professionals and advocates – the catalysts for positive change in the service of equity, climate readiness. , health and well-being in general. For more information visit www.nrpa.org.

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Community Leaders Respond to New City of Cincinnati Government https://avvensanchea.com/community-leaders-respond-to-new-city-of-cincinnati-government/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 14:12:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/community-leaders-respond-to-new-city-of-cincinnati-government/ CINCINNATI – Cincinnati’s newly elected city hall leaders have only been in office since Wednesday, but local leaders are not waiting to weigh on their expectations for this new term. What would you like to know Cincinnati has 10 new elected leaders: nine Democrats and one Republican Elected officials spoke about the importance of working […]]]>

CINCINNATI – Cincinnati’s newly elected city hall leaders have only been in office since Wednesday, but local leaders are not waiting to weigh on their expectations for this new term.


What would you like to know

  • Cincinnati has 10 new elected leaders: nine Democrats and one Republican
  • Elected officials spoke about the importance of working together and promoting racial and social equity
  • Leaders of local organizations expressed optimism about working with the new group
  • Some are more careful with the expectations of this new municipal council

The group is made up of nine Democrats and one Republican, Council member Liz Keating. All spoke of their willingness to work together at Town Hall and many, including Keating, often campaigned together.

As a legislature, they have already voted to appoint John Curp, a former city lawyer, as interim city manager when Paula Boggs Muething resigns her post on January 19. They have also started looking for a replacement for Police Chief Eliot Isaac. , who announced his intention to retire earlier this year.

At the inauguration Tuesday in Washington Park, the 10 new sworn-in officials spoke about common themes of hope, promise and the city’s untapped potential.

When addressing the crowd in the park, Pureval reflected on what this moment would mean for his late father, a refugee from Punjab, India.

“He was barely an adult when he and my mother, a refugee from Tibet, made the incredibly courageous decision to leave everything behind in search of a better life,” Pureval said. He is the first Asian-American mayor of a large city in the Midwest.

Mayor Aftab Pureval addresses the crowd at the swearing-in ceremony in Washington Park in January 2022. (Provided: CitiCable)

“I doubt my father could have imagined a day like today. But he moved his young family here because he was chasing a dream. And he was right, ”added Pureval. “Of course he was right, because Cincinnati is where I made my dream come true. (It) can be – it must be – a place where everyone can make theirs come true. who have felt the benefits of Cincinnati’s greatness in moving it forward and being good stewards of our exercise of self-government.

The message resonated with Bryan Wright, executive director of Cincinnati Compass. The organization works to advance the economic and cultural inclusion of immigrants and refugees, and was founded as a collaboration between the City of Cincinnati, the University of Cincinnati and more than 65 other community partners.

“As a child of refugees who grew up in Ohio to become mayor of Cincinnati, (Pureval’s) journey demonstrates the power and necessity of welcoming immigrants and refugees to the Cincinnati area,” said Wright.

“We look forward to working with Mayor Pureval and this administration to ensure that all immigrants and refugees coming to the Cincinnati area feel a sense of belonging and have the opportunity to continue to enhance the cultural vibrancy and economic growth of the region. Cincinnati area, ”he said. .

During the election campaign, Pureval spoke often about the importance of developing policies that emphasize racial equity. He pledged to work to create more opportunities for those who have traditionally been denied opportunities or been disenfranchised.

These sentiments were shared by several members of the new leadership team, including council member Jan-Michele Lemon Kearney, the city’s new vice mayor.

“My vision is for Cincinnati to be the story of one city, not two cities,” said Lemon Kearney. Referring to the major disparities in life expectancy rates between neighborhoods in Cincinnati, she added, “It’s a matter of fairness. It means that a zip code doesn’t determine our opportunities or our lifespan.

Jan-Michele Lemon Kearney, a member of the Cincinnati City Council, is sworn in in January 2022 in Washington Park.  (Provided: CitiCable)

Jan-Michele Lemon Kearney, a member of the Cincinnati City Council, is sworn in in January 2022 in Washington Park. (Provided: CitiCable)

Katie Eagan, vice president of government affairs for the Cincinnati Regional Chamber of Commerce in the United States, called the inauguration “an exciting day” and “a new era” for the city. The chamber has already had positive conversations with Pureval, its transition team and members of city council, she said.

“We are energized by their enthusiasm to get down to work to bring about equitable growth,” added Eagan. “The Chamber looks forward to partnering with the City Council and Administration to advance the business interests of our members and make Cincinnati a place of economic opportunity for all.

The Urban League of Greater Southwestern Ohio is going through a transition of its own. At the end of December, Urban League CEO Eddie Koen announced he would step down on January 14 to take up a post with a national non-profit organization.

Over the past two years, the league has worked to help thousands of people get financial aid related to COVID, fought for social justice and racial equity, and helped people find new business opportunities. .

Koen also speaks to the city’s newly elected leaders and is encouraged by their “vision for a prosperous Cincinnati.”

“This new group represents an opportunity to transform Cincinnati, build on the great initiatives of the past and boldly adopt new policies and initiatives,” said Koen. “We look forward to being a partner with the mayor and city council, both in action and in responsibility, to promote a more equitable Cincinnati.”

Kevin Finn, president and CEO of Strategies to End Homelessness, said the lack of affordable housing is the most pressing problem facing Cincinnati and other communities across the country.

Housing is considered affordable if it does not cost more than 30% of a family’s monthly income.

In 2017, the Community Building Institute at Xavier University released a report that found Hamilton County lacked more than 40,000 affordable housing units for households with incomes at or below 30% of the region’s median income. , or roughly the minimum wage. About 28,000 of them were in the city of Cincinnati, according to the Cincinnati Action for Housing Now organization.

The group led the charge for Number 3, a failed charter amendment last spring that would have required the city to allocate at least $ 50 million a year on affordable housing. But voters overwhelmingly rejected the issue, with 73% voting against.

Although these affordable housing statistics are now a few years old, Finn said the fight remains urgent.

Finn said he was “very encouraged that many of the new council members and the new mayor are expressing a desire to tackle affordable housing issues.”

Council member Liz Keating takes the oath while holding her child in Washington Park.  (Provided: CitiCable)

Council member Liz Keating takes the oath while holding her child in Washington Park. (Provided: CitiCable)

Mike Moroski, executive director of the Human Services Chamber of Hamilton County, said there was enthusiasm for the city’s new leadership.

“We are confident that we will be able to do a very good job on behalf of those we serve with these new leaders,” he said. “Our priorities for 2022 are affordable housing, workforce issues related to our sector and increased local funding for social services.”

ArtsWave funds more than 150 cultural projects and organizations each year. They are currently partnering with the City of Cincinnati on a grant that will support the creation of original artwork that will wrap the exterior of a Cincinnati Bell Connector streetcar.

The continued uncertainty surrounding the pandemic has affected artists and arts organizations perhaps more than any other local industry, according to Alecia Kintner, CEO and President of ArtsWave.

“Recent help from the local government, working with ArtsWave, has been essential in maintaining the cultural treasures that make Cincinnati vibrant and unique,” ​​said Kintner. She hopes to work with city leaders to “ensure that investing in the arts is a central strategy in bringing our diverse community together and increasing opportunities for all.”

Some are more careful with the expectations of this new City Council. This includes Joshua Burton, a Republican political consultant at RedHouse Strategies.

“With a new board and a new mayor, Cincinnati needs adults in the room who are ready to solve problems and make tough choices, not just score political points,” said Burton, who lives near. ‘Eden Park.

City Hall has been plagued with scandals in recent years, Burton said, and Cincinnati needs a board committed to focusing on local issues and “not the board member’s aspirations for political office. higher”.

Local Republicans have frequently criticized Democratic officials for seeing city council as a stepping stone to senior positions in Columbus or Washington, DC

Just hours after being sworn in to begin his second term on city council, Democrat Greg Landsman announced he would run against longtime incumbent Steve Chabot, a Republican, for the first Congressional District seat of Ohio.

“This board will need to learn to use community-based solutions, not ‘one-size-fits-all’ solutions,” said Burton. “The council’s goal should be to balance the budget with the challenges facing the 52 unique neighborhoods, (such as) improving our transportation, ensuring pedestrian safety, ensuring our neighbors are safe and thriving. all of them, not just on the Rhine and the city center. “

“My hope is that national policy does not turn into meaningless resolutions, but produce successful legislation that has a positive impact on every citizen,” he added.



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Bird Act turns off lights on city-owned buildings in an attempt to save feathered friends https://avvensanchea.com/bird-act-turns-off-lights-on-city-owned-buildings-in-an-attempt-to-save-feathered-friends/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 01:16:13 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/bird-act-turns-off-lights-on-city-owned-buildings-in-an-attempt-to-save-feathered-friends/ Rita McMahon sees carnage fall from the sky. Each year, approximately 1,000 injured birds are brought to the Wild Bird Fund, the Manhattan-based rehabilitation center she runs. Many arrive with double concussions, hitting buildings first and then falling to the sidewalk. Some also suffer from hypothermia from the shock of the cold ground. Many suffer […]]]>

Rita McMahon sees carnage fall from the sky.

Each year, approximately 1,000 injured birds are brought to the Wild Bird Fund, the Manhattan-based rehabilitation center she runs. Many arrive with double concussions, hitting buildings first and then falling to the sidewalk.

Some also suffer from hypothermia from the shock of the cold ground. Many suffer from internal injuries. Most are quite young.

Of all the birds that McMahon’s organization treats, only about a third live.

“These are the lucky birds that we find, put in someone’s pocket or in a paper bag and are brought to us. These are the lucky few, ”said McMahon. “They’ve been flying here for eons, and over the past 200 years we’ve made quite an obstacle course for them. It’s a challenge they have to go through.

New York City is now working to prevent such collisions, one of the leading causes of bird deaths in urban areas.

Legislation recently passed by city council will require city-owned buildings to turn off lights at night, which will save electricity and remove some of the visual pollution that attracts and disturbs browsing birds. in the big city.

Coupled with a law that came into effect in January requiring new buildings to incorporate bird-friendly designs – including simple window decals to warn them of glass towers – bird advocates hope the council’s measures will do a difference as a result of climate-related threats. to our feathered friends.

“This will protect many birds that pass through town at night,” said Andrew Farnsworth, senior associate researcher at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. He expects to see reductions in bird collisions right away.

Now, defenders are ready to push for more protections in the New Year.

Threats of light and glass

New York City is located on the Atlantic Flyway, one of the four major migration routes in North America and the only one on the east coast. The New York City Audubon estimates that between 90,000 and 230,000 birds die each year after colliding with buildings in the five boroughs.

Artificial lighting contributes to these deaths by attracting birds to the city and disorienting those who migrate at night. According to Audubon’s research, the amount of light a building emits is a “strong predictor” of the number of bird collisions that will occur. Reducing lighting, as the two recently passed bills aim to do, can reduce the number of birds attracted to dangerous urban areas.

A bill requires buildings belonging to the city to turn off lights at night and until the wee hours of the morning during the peak migratory season, between mid-August and mid-November as well as between April and the end of May. The measure also applies to buildings of which the City does not own but which is the only tenant.

From 2023 and through 2030, the city must install occupancy sensors at its properties to ensure that the lights are only on when people are inside, thanks to the second bill that was adopted. The council’s finance division estimated that installations of about 17,000 city-owned properties would cost a total of $ 3.4 million, but could result in lower utility bills due to energy savings.

The bills, which will become law in mid-January unless the mayor signs them or veto them first, mark the latest steps to help save the city’s birds. A spokesperson for Mayor Eric Adams did not respond to a request for comment.

Another municipal law came into effect in January that requires all construction and major alterations to include bird-safe materials and designs on facades under 75 feet so birds can avoid hitting windows and doors. glass walls.

“When I started New York City Audubon as an intern in 2013, it was inconceivable to me back then that we would ever have passed legislation to tackle collisions, and now we’ve tackled both the light and glass quite significantly. “said Kaitlyn Parkins, acting director of conservation and science at the New York City Audubon.

“We can save thousands”

Recent legislation passed by the city paves the way for stricter measures that cover more buildings, advocates say.

This year, they will push the Council to launch a bill to extend the policy of extinguishing fires to certain private buildings. The measure was blocked in committee this year after groups like the Real Estate Board of New York opposed it, raising safety concerns for commercial and residential buildings, among others.

At the state level, Sen. Brad Hoylman (D-Manhattan) and Assembly Member Patricia Fahy (D-Albany) on Wednesday introduced legislation that would require exterior lights to be turned off or set to shine only towards the sky. low between 11pm and sunrise.

Inspired by the 226 dead birds A volunteer gathered outside the World Trade Center in September, Manhattan’s Community Board 1 passed a resolution in November to encourage building and property owners to use strategies to mitigate bird strikes.

The resolution also called on the Alliance for Downtown New York to educate building owners about threats to birds and how to counter them.

A bird flies near the glass towers at the northwest corner of Bryant Park, October 1, 2019.
Ben Fractenberg / THE CITY

The board is in the process of connecting the organization “with experts who will help us make recommendations for our local owners,” said Elizabeth Lutz, spokesperson for the Alliance. “We will share this information with them at the start of the New Year. “

The Audubon Company runs a voluntary “Lights Out” initiative that calls for buildings to be dark from midnight to dawn during the migration season. While opposing the Board’s proposed mandate, REBNY said it encourages its members to participate.

The Audubon Society is also working with building owners to improve their facades and turn off lights when the organization observes a pattern of bird strikes near certain properties. Sometimes owners also seek advice when they notice collisions, Parkins said.

The bird collision problem provides an opportunity for everyone to take easy steps to help solve it. The public can submit reports of dead and injured birds to the Audubon through its tracker. And tenants can turn off lights during peak migration season, use blinds when lights are on, and install decals or screens on windows to help prevent bird strikes.

“It’s something in our power,” McMahon said. “We can make a difference now in no time if we address these concerns and we can save thousands of lives. “

Timing is everything

Saving the beak is a top priority for longtime bird watchers and those interested in the pandemic as they sought refuge in the wild, especially as the existential threats to the birds are felt.

Birds have declined by nearly a third nationwide over the past 50 years for a number of reasons, including habitat loss, which is being fueled by housing development and climate change.

“Peak migration dates are getting earlier as temperatures rise across the country,” Farnsworth said.

A pigeon perches on a building on Thompson Street near Washington Square Park.  December 21, 2021.

A pigeon perches on a building on Thompson Street near Washington Square Park. December 21, 2021.
Hiram Alejandro Durán / THE CITY

The staggered timing of migration and the possible lack of food availability – due to global warming – have “a potential for population collapse and the system is starting to collapse,” he said. added.

Even for those whose only thought for birds is to hunt pigeons, scientists argue that it is in the best interests of all humans to preserve these populations.

From pollinating plants and dropping seeds in fire-ravaged areas, to eating insects that bring disease and destroy forests, birds keep the planet healthy and contribute “billions and billions of dollars to agriculture,” said Christine Sheppard, bird strike campaign manager at American Bird Conservation.

“Birds provide services that we cannot replace.”



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