Community Organization – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 20:11:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://avvensanchea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6.png Community Organization – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ 32 32 SIU welcomes returning students to campus and announces upcoming events https://avvensanchea.com/siu-welcomes-returning-students-to-campus-and-announces-upcoming-events/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 20:11:11 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/siu-welcomes-returning-students-to-campus-and-announces-upcoming-events/ File photo August 10, 2022 SIU welcomes returning students to campus and announces upcoming events by Christi Mathis CARBONDALE, Illinois – Southern Illinois University Carbondale will roll out the brown carpet to welcome new and returning students to campus in grand Saluki style with a host of special activities during Saluki Startup and Welcome Weeks. […]]]>

File photo

August 10, 2022

SIU welcomes returning students to campus and announces upcoming events

by Christi Mathis

CARBONDALE, Illinois – Southern Illinois University Carbondale will roll out the brown carpet to welcome new and returning students to campus in grand Saluki style with a host of special activities during Saluki Startup and Welcome Weeks.

Students move into campus August 18-19, with classes beginning August 22. Preparations have been underway for months to ensure a smooth transition for students to their new campus away from home. Check the schedule online, which is constantly updated as activities are added. Students can also keep up to date with what’s going on by downloading the Saluki Superfan app, their portal to keep an eye on student life throughout the year.

Dawg Days helps create a successful transition

SIU’s Dawg Days New Student Retreat, scheduled for August 15-18 at the Touch of Nature Outdoor Education Center, is an action-packed week. Organized and led by students, it is designed to help their new student peers make a successful transition to university life.

move-in-21-v2-sm.jpgParticipants learn about Saluki’s traditions, services and support system while networking and participating in fun activities including battleship games in canoes, dodgeball with tape, kayaking, hiking, rock climbing, canoeing, themed social evenings, a costume party and much more. . They will also be in contact with campus administrators, faculty, and staff, as well as each other.

Connecting with Saluki Startup

Creating a Saluki family connection is the goal of Saluki Startup, scheduled for the first few days of the semester. During special activities from August 18 to 21, the university will help returning and new students get to know each other and the campus.

A recent and popular addition to Saluki Startup is Light up the Lake, scheduled for 7-9 p.m. on August 18, as the boat dock will be glowing all evening. Campus Lake/Becker Pavilion will come alive with glow-in-the-dark games and activities, slacklining, a rock climbing wall, DJ, giveaways, snacks, a pottery wheel and other fun experiences from Saluki.

A resource fair provides information on what is available and how to connect with campus departments or units as well as community organizations. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on August 19, in the ballroom D of the student center. Kicking off the Saluki startup at 6:30 p.m. on August 19 at Saluki Stadium is a giant pep rally, complete with a class photo for new students. Then the action moves to the Student Recreation Center for Late Nite at the Rec, with volleyball, swimming, basketball, and a host of other activities from 9-11 p.m.

2018-DawgDays-sm.jpgThe Student Center is the place to be at 7 p.m. on August 20 for the popular Dawg’s Night Out student festival as attendees enjoy arts and crafts, inflatables, games, food and assorted merriment .

A favorite tradition, Chancellor’s Welcome Fest, will take place from 1 to 3 p.m. on August 21, with a barbecue, DJ, climbing wall, yard and watermelon games, giveaways, and the chance to get acquainted. with campus leaders, faculty, and staff.

There are also meet and greet events sponsored by many colleges and groups and various other activities throughout the early days of classes. Find the full schedule of Saluki Startup events at wow.siu.edu/saluki-startup. For more information on any of the events, email orientation@siu.edu or call 618-453-1000.

Welcome everyone with events galore

At SIU, the “welcoming” vibe continues with a variety of diverse activities for five weeks of welcoming, or WOW, as it’s known on campus. Fall schedule highlights include some very special guests you’ll want to see.

The SIU will be celebrating Diversity Week during this time. Juan Manual “John” Quiñones, ABC News correspondent/reporter and longtime host of “What Would You Do?” will speak at the August 29 kick-off. The August 29-September 1 Diversity Commemoration will also feature a discussion. military culture, a presentation on disability support and accessibility, a jazz ensemble, a celebration of Women’s Equality Day and a jazz and hip-hop seminar, mural painting, SAFE Zone and DACA training and more. The full program will be available online once finalized.

You can also “Meet Kevin and Oscar from ‘The Office'” in the Student Center Ballrooms at 6 p.m. on September 22. Oscar Martinez and Kevin Malone, played by Oscar Nuñez and Brian Baumgartner, will share their time on the NBC Emmy-winning series “The Office.” Students and the general public are invited to attend the free presentation; no ticket is required and admission is on a first-come basis. A book signing will follow, and a few lucky guests will have the opportunity to meet the couple at a reception after the moderated event.

Other welcome week activities include open houses, engagement fair, movies, job fair, bonfire, barbecue, workshops, student organization events and a free family carnival at the West Gymnasium of the Student Recreation Center from 10 a.m. to noon on August 27. with a bouncy house, games, snacks and more. Aimed at non-traditional families, the event is designed to help them learn about campus and the community and connect with resources and other people.

Welcoming Weeks will culminate with Saluki Family Weekend, Sept. 23-25, featuring a craft sale, Greek Sing and other activities, including Football Salukis welcoming North Dakota to a grill action.

Visit wow.siu.edu for the full event schedule, which is subject to change based on weather and other factors.

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Media Advisory

Reporters, photographers and press crews are invited to cover many activities from the SIU Dawg Days New Student Retreat, Saluki Startup and Welcome Weeks.

Good times to capture good stories, photography and video during Dawg Days, taking place August 17-18 at the Touch of Nature Outdoor Education Center, include:

  • The Saluki Welcome Fest, 4:30 p.m. August 15, featuring the SIU Spirit Team and other entertainment along with various guest speakers including Tena Bennett, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Auxiliary Enterprise; Jennifer Jones-Hall, Dean of Students; and Jeffery T. Burgin Jr., vice chancellor for student affairs.
  • Participants will alternate between various active games, 9am-12pm August 16.
  • New students will enjoy a costume party at 9 p.m. Aug. 17.

All activities take place at Camp 2. For more information or to arrange a visit to Touch of Nature at another time, contact Brian Croft at 618-453-1121 or bcroft@siu.edu.

You can also find great story, photography and video opportunities on the SIU campus at many Saluki Startups and WOWs, including:

  • Moving in, which begins 18 for new students and continuing August 19 for returning students. For more information, visit housing.siu.edu/move-in/. For more details, contact Jim Hunsaker, Senior Associate Director of Operations for University Housing, at 618-453-1067, 618-201-2211 (cell) or jhuns@siu.edu.
  • Light up the lake, 7-9pm August 18Becker Pavilion, Campus Lake.
  • Saluki launch event, 6:30-8:00 p.m. August 19Saluki Stadium.
  • Late at night at the Rec, 9-11 p.m., Student recreation center.
  • Dawg’s party, 7-11 p.m. August 20, Student Center. Creative hobbies, games, inflatable structures.
  • Chancellor’s Welcome Festival, 1-3pm August 21Shryock Lawn, climbing wall, yard and watermelon games, and more.
  • Commitment Fair, 5-7 p.m. August 25, Place Faner. Students can find out what’s happening on campus, find out about campus resources and registered student organizations as well as community organizations when they meet other Salukis. Contact rsohelp@siu.edu or 618-453-5714.
  • family carnival, 10am-12pm August 27Student recreation center.
  • diversity week, 29-Sept.1. The full program will be posted once finalized.
  • “Meet Kevin and Oscar from ‘The Office’” 6 p.m. September 22Student Center Ballrooms.

The full schedule of Welcome Weeks events is available at wow.siu.edu. For more information, contact Jennifer Jones-Hall, Dean of Students, at jennifer.jones-hall@siu.edu or 618-453-4846.

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Packers Foundation awards $1.35 million in impact grants to organizations in Brown, Dane and Milwaukee County https://avvensanchea.com/packers-foundation-awards-1-35-million-in-impact-grants-to-organizations-in-brown-dane-and-milwaukee-county/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 21:26:36 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/packers-foundation-awards-1-35-million-in-impact-grants-to-organizations-in-brown-dane-and-milwaukee-county/ The Green Bay Packers Foundation announced this week that it has awarded a total of $1.35 million in impact grants to seven nonprofit organizations in Brown, Dane and Milwaukee County. A record total amount awarded at one time for the Impact Grants program, which began in 2013, the grants aim to direct significant funds to […]]]>

The Green Bay Packers Foundation announced this week that it has awarded a total of $1.35 million in impact grants to seven nonprofit organizations in Brown, Dane and Milwaukee County.

A record total amount awarded at one time for the Impact Grants program, which began in 2013, the grants aim to direct significant funds to organizations that serve their communities every day.

The grants of varying amounts were awarded to five organizations in Brown County and one in Dane and Milwaukee counties, and all but one of the grants are matching grants, requiring each recipient organization to raise the same amount in order to guarantee the donation.

  • Healing Connections, Inc.received a matching grant of $250,000 for their Village d’antan project, an innovative approach to caring for people with memory loss.
  • Syble Hopp School received a $100,000 grant to equip the vocational/community training space.
  • Bellin Health Foundation Inc. received a matching grant of $250,000 for its neonatal intensive care unit and maternity project.
  • Maison Doree Inc. received a matching grant of $200,000 for the construction of a new, larger facility to increase capacity and outreach office space.
  • Friends of the Fox River Trail received a $50,000 matching grant to repair and improve trails to provide safety, welcome new users, and promote business and tourism from downtown Green Bay to Greenleaf.
  • The Center for Black Excellence and Culture received a matching grant of $250,000 to be spent on building the Center, a destination that showcases and nurtures Black talent and contributions. This grant is the first grant awarded to a Dane County organization under the Packers Foundation Impact Grant program.
  • Milwaukee Public Schools Foundation received a $250,000 matching grant for its Let Us Play project, involving multiple partners focused on transforming MPS’s 212 public playgrounds into community spaces for students, athletes and families.

“We are proud to award these grants to seven different organizations across the state of Wisconsin,” said Packers President and CEO Mark Murphy. “We have been fortunate to be able to enhance our charitable giving through The Packers Foundation since the beginning of our Impact Grants program, and we are pleased to award these significant gifts to these nonprofit organizations. These funds will help care for our most vulnerable neighbors and ensure children, families and individuals in our communities have what they need to learn, grow and thrive.”

Since launching the Impact Grants program in 2013, The Packers Foundation has disbursed $7.9 million through Impact Grants, awarding grants to organizations that focus on a wide variety of areas of need. , including education, homelessness, and the health and well-being of children, families, and seniors. . The Foundation has now distributed over $18 million for charitable purposes since its inception in 1986 by then-President of the Packers Corporation, Justice Robert J. Parins, “as a means of ensuring continued charitable contributions.”

Green Bay Packers Foundation Impact Grants are part of Green Bay Packers Give Back. Combined with other Green Bay Packers charitable efforts, the grant program contributes to a comprehensive Packers charitable impact that exceeded $9 million last year.

Note to media: Photos of the nonprofit groups, including photos of their check presentations, can be found here: https://packers.files.com/f/8903f0104c73c38d

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Back-to-school supply discount today – American Press https://avvensanchea.com/back-to-school-supply-discount-today-american-press/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 17:23:38 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/back-to-school-supply-discount-today-american-press/ (Metro Creative Services) DeRidder’s C&B Community Organization will hold its 13th annual back-to-school supply giveaway today, August 6, and the organization’s founding members said they anticipate some of the biggest crowds yet. Beginning at 5 p.m. in the Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall at 506 West Drive, volunteers will provide free school supplies to all K-12 students, […]]]>

DeRidder’s C&B Community Organization will hold its 13th annual back-to-school supply giveaway today, August 6, and the organization’s founding members said they anticipate some of the biggest crowds yet.

Beginning at 5 p.m. in the Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall at 506 West Drive, volunteers will provide free school supplies to all K-12 students, as well as hot dogs, drinks and snacks. free music to celebrate the start of the new school year.

Founding committee member Billy Spikes said the event typically attends between 300 and 400 students each year, but he thinks this year could see even higher numbers.

“We think with the tough financial year everyone has had this year, this could be our biggest band yet,” Spikes said.

Funds to purchase school supplies for the giveaway each year come directly from sales of barbecue dinners that members of the organization cook and serve throughout the year, as well as donations from community members. Spikes said the organizing committee members also contribute financially to ensure that no one with a genuine need goes away empty-handed.

“If we run out of donations, we’re pulling from our own pockets to make sure everyone is taken care of,” Spikes said.

Committee member Carlos Archield, who founded the organization with Spikes, said the event was created in the spirit of encouraging the community to take care of each other.

“It all started when we saw there was a need here at DeRidder, and we wanted to fill that need. We are really proud of what it has become today and the number of families we are able to help,” said Archield.

The event has grown by leaps and bounds since its inception, having first taken place at a pavilion in downtown DeRidder. The overwhelming response and large crowds over the next few years eventually prompted the organizers to move the event to the local park, and now the event is being held in the exhibition hall of the fairgrounds to allow the crowd to s’ escape humid summer temperatures.

The event will continue until all supplies have been distributed on Saturday, and organizers remind attendees that all students must be present to receive their supplies.

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Nebraska Announces Long-Term Commitment to Red Carpet Experience with Endowment Donation https://avvensanchea.com/nebraska-announces-long-term-commitment-to-red-carpet-experience-with-endowment-donation/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 21:08:59 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/nebraska-announces-long-term-commitment-to-red-carpet-experience-with-endowment-donation/ History links Nebraska Athletics announced Tuesday that the red carpet experience will continue through the 2022-23 sports season and into the future. The future of the program was secured through a multi-year gift from the Fred and Sally Bekins Foundation and the continued generosity of many donors across the state. The Red […]]]>

Nebraska Athletics announced Tuesday that the red carpet experience will continue through the 2022-23 sports season and into the future. The future of the program was secured through a multi-year gift from the Fred and Sally Bekins Foundation and the continued generosity of many donors across the state.

The Red Carpet Experience debuted at Nebraska’s 2021 home football games and provided free tickets to underserved youth across the state of Nebraska. The program expanded to several other sports in the 2021-22 season, including volleyball, men’s and women’s basketball, softball and baseball. In total, the program provided more than 4,000 free tickets to young Husker fans last season.

“The Fred and Sally Bekins Foundation is very pleased to support the Red Carpet Experience program,” said a Bekins Foundation board member. “Nebraska athletes are great role models for our young people and experiencing a game day at Lincoln is something everyone should be able to enjoy. We hope others will join us in helping support this program and donating. to all Nebraskas the opportunity to cheer on the Huskers.”

The Red Carpet Experience program offers underserved Husker fans the opportunity to experience game day in Nebraska and experience the excitement of Husker sporting events.

“The red carpet experience epitomizes the generosity of Husker Nation,” said Dr. Lawrence Chatters, Nebraska AD Executive Assistant for Strategic Initiatives. “I was fortunate to help build this program and it has touched many lives, including those of our student-athletes and staff. We are all better off when more people can have access to Husker Nation. “

Red Carpet Experience Information

  • For the 2022 football season, the Red Carpet Experience will provide 250 tickets for all home games other than the Sept. 17 game against Oklahoma.
  • 100 tickets will be available for Nebraska volleyball’s Red-White Scrimmage on August 20.
  • Tickets will also be available for select men’s and women’s basketball, baseball and softball competitions through the Red Carpet Experience. These selected games will be announced at a later date.
  • Per NCAA recruiting rules, high school and college students may only participate in the Red Carpet Experience if they participate as a member of a bona fide, non-athletic related youth organization that includes elementary and/or middle school students. .
  • Nonprofits and other community organizations interested in getting involved and gaining access to the red carpet experience should contact Dr. Lawrence Chatters at redcarpet@huskers.com.
  • For more information on this initiative, visit huskers.com/redcarpet.

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Montgomery’s new development chief outlines his plan for the city https://avvensanchea.com/montgomerys-new-development-chief-outlines-his-plan-for-the-city/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 02:01:49 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/montgomerys-new-development-chief-outlines-his-plan-for-the-city/ Darryl Washington remembers his mother sending him to deliver food to a neighbor down the street. This neighbor always sent him home with something for his own family. “It’s a community. That’s what we need to get back to,” said Washington, who is the new economic development chief under Montgomery Mayor Steven Reed. That’s not […]]]>

Darryl Washington remembers his mother sending him to deliver food to a neighbor down the street. This neighbor always sent him home with something for his own family.

“It’s a community. That’s what we need to get back to,” said Washington, who is the new economic development chief under Montgomery Mayor Steven Reed.

That’s not easy to do when “community investing” means dollars pouring in from out of state to buy single family homes and turn them into rental properties, he said.

New leaders: Mayor of Montgomery names new leaders for economic development, parks and recreation

“(These owners) are miles away,” Washington said. “And I think that’s been one of the things that has damaged neighborhoods all over the United States.”

The Birmingham native has worked here for around 60 days and said he sees the need to focus on different parts of the city as well, whether it’s downtown or west Montgomery.

For example, he mentioned the potential for an underdeveloped area here that includes the historic St. Jude campus, the old Calhoun Foods, Carver High School, and an interstate exit near Maxwell Air Force Base. The city plans to bring in affordable housing and retail investors in August to showcase the neighborhood.

“Sometimes it only takes one person to make that investment in an area for an area to change,” he said.

Washington has spent 25 years in development, most recently serving as District Development Manager for Urban Impact in Birmingham’s historic Civil Rights District. In his five years with this organization, he helped secure $150 million for the district and left just as they were preparing for a major surge in visitors.

He arrived in Montgomery in May, at a time when restaurants in the city’s tourist district were struggling to keep doors open amid a national staffing shortage, even as the city and county worked together on the way to spend an $87 million US bailout pool. Money Law. A $50 million whitewater center was taking shape, along with a new plan for downtown.

“Downtown revitalization is a goal because that’s really the character of your city. Most people who come to visit, often they don’t go beyond downtown,” Washington said.

“…(But) if you don’t have full buy-in from the community, a plan just becomes a plan.

Washington said he decided to take the job here because of the city’s unique strengths, such as military leaders at Maxwell Air Force Base and potential uses of the nearby Alabama River, including an announced inland port facility. earlier this year that city officials estimate could generate 2,600 direct jobs and $340 million in revenue.

Meanwhile, he said the city plans to work with colleges here to develop a better-educated workforce and give them reasons to stay.

“We can go out and hire a company that creates 100 jobs, but if we don’t have the talent to fill those 100 jobs, then how does that really help the city of Montgomery?” Washington said.

“… The reality is that the tourists are the sauce,” he said. “Because when there are no conventions in town, no concerts in town, it’s the locals who do the real business.”

Contact Montgomery Advertiser reporter Brad Harper at bharper1@gannett.com.

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In a California town, a militia is welcomed by some, warned by others https://avvensanchea.com/in-a-california-town-a-militia-is-welcomed-by-some-warned-by-others/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 20:41:46 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/in-a-california-town-a-militia-is-welcomed-by-some-warned-by-others/ The H&L Lumber parking lot in Mariposa, Calif., saw a flurry of activity on Sunday as members of a local militia wearing military-style fatigues handed out pancakes and steak sandwiches to evacuees of the Oak Fire raging nearby. Along with breakfast, they handed out business cards with QR codes and instructions to join their militia. […]]]>

The H&L Lumber parking lot in Mariposa, Calif., saw a flurry of activity on Sunday as members of a local militia wearing military-style fatigues handed out pancakes and steak sandwiches to evacuees of the Oak Fire raging nearby. Along with breakfast, they handed out business cards with QR codes and instructions to join their militia.

Some say members of the Echo Company militia served as a de facto checkpoint or publicity for the group during the crisis, according to witnesses who spoke to NBC News on condition of anonymity because they did not want to be identified.

“They had their whole setup with military-style trucks, and they were fatigues and so on,” said Rain Winchester, manager of the nearby Monarch Inn in Mariposa. “I’m fine with them helping with the relief efforts as long as they don’t start setting up roadblocks or doing security work. I don’t want them doing the work of the office of the sheriff.”

The militia is becoming a constant presence in rural Mariposa County southeast of Sacramento with a population of 17,131 scattered across 14 cities, according to the 2010 U.S. Census.

Providing immediate assistance in military-style gear during an emergency is a recruiting tactic used by militias nationwide, and not limited to Mariposa County. As climate change creates more wildfires and adverse weather events, further straining local law enforcement and fire departments, militias across the country have seized disasters as opportunities to get involved in politics and small community emergency services.

Following the Oregon fires in 2020, militias set up civilian roadblocks, which arrested at least one fleeing black family and were ignored by local police. Members of the Oath Keepers created a “community protection team”, six of whom were arrested for breaking curfew during Hurricane Michael in 2018.

Joshua James, an oath keeper who stormed the US Capitol on January 6, met and joined the militia during the relief operations following Hurricane Irma in 2017.

Wildfires in the United States this year have consumed 5.6 million acres. The Oak Fire destroyed at least 116 homes and burned more than 19,000 acres, according to local fire authorities.

Serving as de facto aid organizations is a common recruitment and community gratification tactic used in rural areas to gain support and acceptance in times of emergency, said Rachel Goldwasser, research analyst at Southern Poverty. Law Center.

“Although help is always needed in difficult times, it is extremely important to remember that the militias provide it with a program,” she said.

“This program is about recruiting community members, including victims into their organizations, legitimizing them and radicalizing people to have grievances against the government that they may very well express through intimidation or violence.”

Echo Company is one of hundreds of active militias across the United States, according to a 2016 tally by the Southern Poverty Law Center, a number that has steadily increased in recent years. Experts have warned that the militias were encouraged by former President Donald Trump and other Republican Party leaders.

The number of Echo Company members was not immediately clear. In a time when there is no disaster, he is best known for organizing training sessions for his members and attending demonstrations, common practices for American militias.

Echo Company, however, is well known to Californian militias.

He was ousted from the state’s largest militia organization in California in 2020 for capitalizing on broader, fictitious fears of antifa looters and “behavior that was interpreted as potentially inciting and militant.”

Echo Company attended a straight pride rally in 2020, alongside the Central Valley Proud Boys.

But there are signs that his efforts to provide services have worked. In recent years, the group has gained favor with some community members, as evidenced by the response to a Facebook post from the sheriff’s office warning residents to “be aware of local militia around of the town of Mariposa”.

The post was soon flooded with militia support. Hours later, the Sheriff’s Department issued an “update” softening their stance.

“Clearing up the confusion and responding to the large number of comments on this original post,” the updated post read. “We are not denying community groups help to those affected by the Oak Fire, but it is important that we let the community know about the resources available to them from the incident and Mariposa County.”

The sheriff’s office later added that it “appreciated” the militia’s efforts.

“We had received several notifications asking why we had ‘activated this militia’ [and] this post was to clarify that we have not activated them, they are acting on their own with courtesy,” the post read. “We appreciate their efforts and all [of] the efforts of other private groups or entities assisting our community. »

Echo Company management did not respond to an emailed request for comment. The Mariposa County Sheriff’s Office declined to comment.

The wildfires have been a particularly active time for militias, including Echo Company, often due to misinformation that antifa or looting groups come to take advantage of their communities. In 2020, law enforcement in California and the Pacific Northwest struggled to contain false rumors that antifa was intentionally starting wildfires so that “antifa buses” could smash into communities. towns and loot local businesses.

Mickee Hernandez, a leader of California’s largest state militia, said the Echo Company was kicked out of the group for providing private security to companies fearful of false rumors on Facebook that antifa was on the about coming to loot the stores in Atwater, California.

“We had a falling out, so to speak. We officially deactivated the unit. They continue to use our nickname,” he said.

The QR code given to residents of Mariposa on Sunday directed those who scanned it to a cloned website of the California State Militia, 2nd Infantry, which is not affiliated with Hernandez’s larger group.

Before the group was banned from Facebook amid a broader crackdown on militias, Echo Company posted photos of the group in fatigues keeping the community safe, including “guys standing on the roof with guns” , Hernandez said.

“The militias, in California in particular, can’t do things like this for pay with weapons, especially because of California law. It creates doubt in the minds of the public about what we’re trying to do” , did he declare.

Before the regiment was banned from Facebook, Echo Company posted a logo of the Three Percenters, an extremist movement that advocates for a second American Civil War.

Brian Ferguson, spokesman for the California Office of Emergency Services, said there were no circumstances under which California would “activate” a militia.

“California has a national guard. We have an army. We don’t have a state militia,” he said. “It’s something we take very seriously. It’s in no way related to the state and it’s not something we condone.”

Goldwasser said that while militias can provide assistance in the moment, it is dangerous to allow them to take over from official aid organizations after emergencies.

“There is no easy way to regulate how militias volunteer during or after natural disasters,” she said. “Since they are not invited to participate and are not run by a legitimate agency, they can discriminate against the people they choose to help or worse, discriminate against victims whose ideologies or skin colors are different. of theirs.”

On Facebook, comments continued to pour in in support of the Echo Company, thanking the group for the pancakes, with many insisting it was “good to stop the looters”.

“Thank you for your service. The police can’t be everywhere, there are quite a few in our areas. Don’t loot and we won’t shoot!!” a comment at the top reads, quoting a Facebook post by Trump from May 2020.

Other respondents to the message from the sheriff’s office insisted that their community did not need the help of the militia.

“There is a large open park with a shade-filled pavilion. Completely empty. You would think this would be the perfect place for the evacuees to eat and relax, but no, they chose a few parking lots in the middle of city, very visible, so they can advertise,” one commenter replied.

“They don’t have any authority. They’re in costume and they want attention. That’s it. Otherwise, they’d move their masquerade somewhere that makes sense.”

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BRENHAM ISD WILL CELEBRATE ITS 147TH ANNIVERSARY AND HONOR DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI https://avvensanchea.com/brenham-isd-will-celebrate-its-147th-anniversary-and-honor-distinguished-alumni/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 21:11:43 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/brenham-isd-will-celebrate-its-147th-anniversary-and-honor-distinguished-alumni/ Four Brenham ISD graduates will be honored on September 2, 2022 as the district celebrates its 147th anniversary. Brenham ISD is the oldest public school in Texas, and each year the community celebrates with a luncheon and recognition of four outstanding alumni who have demonstrated leadership and public service after graduation. The event will take […]]]>

Four Brenham ISD graduates will be honored on September 2, 2022 as the district celebrates its 147th anniversary. Brenham ISD is the oldest public school in Texas, and each year the community celebrates with a luncheon and recognition of four outstanding alumni who have demonstrated leadership and public service after graduation. The event will take place at the Blinn College Student Center in Brenham and will include lunch and a program to honor distinguished alumni.

This year’s distinguished alumni will include Mayme (Dennis) Gardner, Pickard High School Class of 1949; Clarence Gerke, Brenham High School Class of 1962; Gus Mutscher, Brenham High School Class of 1952, and Ben Seeker, Brenham High School Class of 1965.

Mayme J. Dennis Gardner has made many lasting contributions to the fields of education and music with his passion and dedication. After graduating from high school, she earned her bachelor’s degree from Prairie View A&M University and her master’s degree from Louisiana State University. She also earned her elementary education certification from Southern University of Baton Rouge. In her 36-year teaching career, she has served as a high school music teacher, elementary school teacher, reading lab specialist, vice-principal, and parish superintendent in Jefferson, Louisiana. At Granville T. Woods Elementary, she implemented three programs that improved morale, attendance, and academic achievement.

In 1991, Ms. Gardner was honored with a “Mayme Gardner Day” proclamation sponsored by the city of Kenner, Louisiana. She established Gardner’s Music School and received numerous awards for her outstanding work in organizing a community gospel choir for adults and sponsoring a choir for teens. She also worked with a community organization that helped low-income families. Additionally, Ms. Gardner received the Edwin Hogan Outstanding Musicians Award. In the church community, she oversaw a teen pregnancy prevention program, taught Sunday school, and served as a church musician for more than 65 years. She is currently a pianist for “The Voices of Beaumont”, a group of seniors who sing for residents of local nursing homes and rehabilitation facilities. She is a member of the Cathedral of Faith Baptist Church in Beaumont, where she led the “Lay Christian Counselors Ministry”, teaches Sunday School, writes and produces annual Easter contests, and is a member of the “Sisters 4 Sisters” which helps African American women. who have cancer.

Mrs. Gardner is the widow of Royal Gardner and the mother of the late Ronald J. Materre, Alpha Materre Mack and J. Brian Gardner. She is the daughter of the late Reverend James E. Dennis and Hester Williams Dennis of Brenham and is the grandmother of five and great-grandmother of three.

Clarence Gerke graduated from Brenham High School in 1962 and is well known in Washington County as president and owner of Memorial Oaks Chapel and as a community service leader. After graduating, he attended Blinn College and earned his Associate of Arts degree, then continued his education at Commonwealth College of Sciences.

with an Associate of Arts degree from Mortuary School. From 1990 to 2004, Gerke was a member of Selected Independent Funeral Directors, the largest independent international funeral organization, and he served as their president from 2003 to 2004. In June 2016, he was recognized for his 50 years of service as director of funerals.

Gerke’s philanthropic endeavors include serving as co-founder, organizer, and past president of Goodfellows of Washington County, an organization that provided Christmas gifts and holiday food to residents of Washington County in need during the 1980s. He also organized a tribute, “Lest They Be Forgotten” to area veterans in 2010, an event in which 450 local veterans were honored at Brenham High School. In 2010, he was recognized by the Washington County Chamber of Commerce as “Man of the Year”. He served on the church board of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Brenham, was a board member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Brenham Maifest Association, the Washington County Little League, and the Washington County Healthy Living Association. During his tenure as president of the Brenham Band Parents organization, he was instrumental (no pun intended) in initiating the scholarship program.

Gerke was married to the late Janet Gerke, who was also recognized as a Brenham ISD Distinguished Alumnus in 2013, and has two children, Melissa Gerke-Lyons and Chad Gerke, and 4 grandchildren. He married Jill Vivroux in 2012 and they live in Brenham, where he is “semi-retired”.

Gus F. Mutscher played baseball as the Brenham Cub and graduated from Brenham High School in 1952. Named “Mr. Buccaneer” by the student body, he attended Blinn College on a baseball scholarship and played baseball with the Blinn Bucs before earning his Associate of Arts degree. He then attended the University of Texas and earned a Bachelor of Commerce degree and a reserve commission in the U.S. Army. His accomplishments show a life dedicated to bettering his community and the state of Texas. His local efforts on behalf of Blinn College to secure additional funding and growth, as well as the development of its alumni base and Hall of Honor, have helped make Blinn a great asset to our community and the surrounding region.

All of his accomplishments testify to Mutscher’s active involvement in his community, his state and his nation. After college, he started in sales at the Borden Company in Houston and received the Young Texan Award from the Houston Chamber of Commerce. In 1960 he was elected to the Texas House of Representatives, representing five Texas counties. In 1969, he was elected President of the Chamber; during his tenure, the House increased state financial support for higher education, mental health, and other state social services. He was instrumental in establishing Brenham State School, now known as the Brenham State Supported Living Center, bringing jobs and careers to Brenham, and he also helped establish the Star of the Republic Museum in Washington-on-the-Brazos State Park. . In 1976, he was elected to the post of judge of Washington County, a position he held for 12 years.

A longtime member of Grace Lutheran Church in Brenham, Mutscher served as president of the congregation and president of the Washington County Cancer Society. He has two children, Gus Hurley Mutscher and Lisa Mutscher Mikus, and is the proud grandfather of four grandsons. He currently lives in Brenham.

Ben Researcher was a member of the Cub Varsity football team and graduated from Brenham High School in 1965. He received his bachelor’s degree in history and English from Sam Houston State University and his master’s degree in educational administration from Prairie View A&M University. He served his country as an Army First Lieutenant from 1970 to 1972, which included a tour of duty in Vietnam. He gave himself to his country, his state and his community and made mentoring the youth and future leaders of our community a priority by sharing the concepts of patriotism, honesty and leadership.

Seeker started his career as a school bus driver, teacher and coach at Burton ISD then later transferred to Brenham ISD. He was an administrator at Brenham for 20 years, mostly at Brenham Middle School, where he was campus principal and started the 8th grade custodial program. He then worked for Tarlton Supply/Trepan Tools, which later became part of the MIC Group, and helped start the vocational training program which is now known as Hodde Tech Center. He is a member of VFW Post 7104 and a two-time post commander. He is a member of the Washington County Veterans Association, having served as Past President of that organization, a founding member of the Brenham Honor Guard, and has been a speaker at Veterans Day and Memorial Day programs at all schools. of Brenham and the community. Recently, out of 6000 VFW messages worldwide, only 270 received the All American award. Brenham VFW Post 7104 was one of them, having also earned all-state honors.

Seeker is a longtime member of Brenham First Baptist Church and has been married to his wife, Kay, for 39 years. They have 3 daughters: Jennifer Seeker Emerson, Kari Seeker Mika and Shelby Seeker Colley.

Brenham ISD’s 147th anniversary celebration is open to the public. Seats at the celebration are $30 per person or $240 for a table of eight. Reservations can be made by calling Brooke Trahan at Brenham ISD at 979-277-3700 ext 3715. You can also visit the Administrative Office at 711 East Mansfield Street or send a check to Brenham ISD at PO Box 1147. to reserve seats is Thursday, August 25 or when seats are sold out.

(Story courtesy of Bonnie Brinkmeyer, Brenham ISD Education Foundation)

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City of Seattle holds community conversations in search for police chief https://avvensanchea.com/city-of-seattle-holds-community-conversations-in-search-for-police-chief/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 00:35:37 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/city-of-seattle-holds-community-conversations-in-search-for-police-chief/ Seattle – Seattle residents and community members are invited to join in five upcoming community conversations that will shape the city’s search for the Seattle Police Department’s next police chief. Hosted by the Mayor’s Office and facilitated by Empower Initiative, the discussions will create opportunities for Seattle residents to share the priorities and values ​​they […]]]>

Seattle – Seattle residents and community members are invited to join in five upcoming community conversations that will shape the city’s search for the Seattle Police Department’s next police chief. Hosted by the Mayor’s Office and facilitated by Empower Initiative, the discussions will create opportunities for Seattle residents to share the priorities and values ​​they seek in the city’s next police chief.

“As we work to identify the next chief of our Seattle Police Department, we have designed a community-driven search process where input and outreach are key,” said Mayor Bruce Harrell. “From the highest levels, our Seattle Police Department must reflect the qualities demanded by the residents of Seattle – a leader who directs an effective service with accountability, innovation and transparency. These forums, in addition to our search committee and survey, ensure that we receive a wide range of perspectives that strengthen our efforts to hire the best possible police chief, address current community priorities, and build a safe city for all. all.

An in-person conversation for the general public will take place this Tuesday July 26 from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at North Seattle Community College (room: The Grove). The 90-minute conversation will include a presentation on policing and best practices from other cities, a question-and-answer period, and an open forum for neighbors to provide additional feedback, ideas, and feedback as you go. as research continues. Additional forums throughout the week will also generate targeted contributions from Seattle communities.

These conversations offer residents an additional option to have their voices heard, drawing on a community survey made available from the start of the research here in seven different languages: English, Spanish, Amharic, Somali, Korean, Vietnamese, Chinese . In April, Mayor Harrell announced the creation of a search committee representing a broad cross-section of stakeholders and community leaders to identify and select the final five candidates to advance to the competition phase required by the Charter. In addition to the survey, committee and forums, community engagement will continue throughout the research process.

The week’s forums will be moderated by Ben McBride of Empower Initiative, an organization that has worked with 100 executives and law enforcement agencies. The goal of these conversations is to create a space for community members to elevate their perspectives and experiences to inform the research process and future efforts to ensure public safety for all communities.

An overview of the scheduled forums, as well as regular updates on the Chief of Police’s search process and timeline, can be found on the Seattle Police Chief’s Search webpage. Please note that these conversations may have a “community-focused” area, but are not exclusive to that community. Links to these virtual meetings will be posted here for the public to observe and engage.

Time Location Community orientation
July 25, 6:00-7:30 p.m. Mount Calvary Christian Church: 1412 23rd Avenue Seattle, WA 98122 Faith, Central District, South Seattle
July 26, 5:00-6:30 p.m. Virtual (The link to view will be on the website) Small businesses and local businesses
July 26, 7:00-8:30 p.m. North Seattle College (room: The Grove) General public
July 30, 3:00-4:30 p.m. Rainier Beach Community College (room: multipurpose room – MPR) Youth
July 30, 5:00-6:30 p.m. Virtual (The link to view will be on the website) Immigrant and Refugee (Live interpreter lines will be available)

If you are interested and available to participate or would like to invite a delegate, please send your RSVPs to Nina.Park@seattle.gov

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The Vineyard Gazette – Martha’s Vineyard News https://avvensanchea.com/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 20:29:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ The Vineyard House celebrated its 25th annual Seaside Water Tasting Thursday night at Waban Park in Oak Bluffs. The fundraiser, filled with a raw bar, paella, raffle and signature water tasting, both still and sparkling, supports Islanders struggling with substance abuse disorder. Bill Howell, chairman of the organization’s board of directors and former resident of […]]]>

The Vineyard House celebrated its 25th annual Seaside Water Tasting Thursday night at Waban Park in Oak Bluffs. The fundraiser, filled with a raw bar, paella, raffle and signature water tasting, both still and sparkling, supports Islanders struggling with substance abuse disorder.

Bill Howell, chairman of the organization’s board of directors and former resident of Vineyard House, the island’s only sober community, was one of the featured speakers.

Owner of a local construction company, Mr Howell stressed the importance of the immersive treatment offered by the organization, citing his own experience with the program as proof of its effectiveness. He particularly thanked Kate Desrosiers, Executive Director of Vineyard House, and the entire island community for their continued stewardship of the organization.

“This event tonight gives me a lot of hope,” Mr Howell said after his speech. “To see this level of support from the community is incredible. Drug addiction isn’t always the bright and flashy cause to support. It means a lot to see everyone here.

Founded in 1997, the Vineyard House provides structured, sober housing for 24 island residents struggling with substance abuse. In the decades since its inception, the organization has helped more than 350 men and women recover from their addictions to alcohol and drugs.

The organization thanks fundraisers like Water Tasting for funding the program, enabling the participation of many Islanders who cannot afford the high cost of off-island rehabilitation facilities.

Linda Jackson, an Edgartown attorney, has volunteered at the water tasting since its inception.

“I became involved with Vineyard House because of my own experience and observations of what the island needed to serve those struggling with addiction,” Ms. Jackson said.

According to the Department of Public Health, Dukes County consistently reports one of the highest rates of substance use disorders per capita in the state. In 2020, a survey recorded by public health nonprofit Public Good Projects showed that most winemakers believe addiction is a serious problem on the island.

It was evident that the challenges of substance abuse had affected many of the community members present and volunteers at the event. Event volunteer Ava Maggi was inspired to help with the water tasting after growing up amid the island community’s struggles with illness.

“I have a lot of people who have benefited from all the help drug addicts get on the island,” said Ms Maggi, a student from Oak Bluffs. “I’ve known most people here all my life. I just want to give back after all the help they got from [The Vineyard House].”

The party continued well into the evening, with baked goods and fresh fruit provided for dessert. Edgartown residents Kristin and Tim Brown mingled with the crowd as the festivities wrapped up.

“It’s a must-attend event of the summer. I’m really happy it’s been going on for so long,” Ms Brown said, adding that while she’d heard about the fundraiser for years, it was the first time she attended.

“All we have is each other on this island, and that’s why this event is so important,” added her husband.

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Allies Mobilize to Advance American Indian and Alaska Native Health https://avvensanchea.com/allies-mobilize-to-advance-american-indian-and-alaska-native-health/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 13:15:47 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/allies-mobilize-to-advance-american-indian-and-alaska-native-health/ Today, most American Indians and Alaska Natives who live in cities have unique health needs. The Kresge Foundation has been an ally and partner of the National Urban Indian Health Council and recently tuned in for a chat with its chief executive, Francys Crevier. Below, Crevier explains how organizational partnerships have continued to support advances […]]]>

Today, most American Indians and Alaska Natives who live in cities have unique health needs. The Kresge Foundation has been an ally and partner of the National Urban Indian Health Council and recently tuned in for a chat with its chief executive, Francys Crevier. Below, Crevier explains how organizational partnerships have continued to support advances in health equity and pave the way for equitable health care in Indian Country.

Kresge: What is the National Urban Indian Health Council and what is the mission of the organization?

Crevier: The National Council of Urban Indian Health (NCUIH) is a national, nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and developing quality, accessible, and culturally competent health services for American Indians and Alaska Natives living in urban settings.

The NCUIH is the only national organization that focuses on and advocates for urban Indigenous health, and we provide technical assistance, training, policy support and other much-needed services to Urban Indian Organizations (UIOs) that provide health services to urban American Indians and Alaska Natives. located throughout the United States. For more than 20 years, the NCUIH has advocated for health equity for the urban Indian population. We envision a nation where comprehensive personal and public health services are available and accessible to all Indigenous people living in urban centers across the United States.

The NCUIH also works on Capitol Hill and with federal government agencies to advocate for access to culturally competent health care for urban Native Americans and Alaska Natives across the country.

Kresge: Why does the National Urban Indian Health Council focus on the health of urban American Indians and Alaska Natives?

Crevier: From the 1700s and 1800s, federal government policy was to strip tribal lands from American Indians and Alaska Natives. At 19e and 20e Over the centuries, federal boarding schools were established and Native American and Alaska Native children were taken from their reservations and families and inserted into alien environments. Federal government resettlement policies lasted into the 1970s and forced American Indians and Alaska Natives off tribal lands.

Today, more than 70% of the Native American and Alaska Native population lives in urban areas. The movement of our population to urban areas has exposed this group to a host of infectious disease problems, and many have experienced economic instability, homelessness, unemployment, poverty, and a lack of cultural connectedness or sense of the community.

Our ancestors signed treaties with the federal government guaranteeing health care for American Indians in this country. They signed the treaties to ensure that future generations have everything they need to be healthy, and we won’t stop fighting until that happens. We envision a nation where comprehensive personal and public health services are available and accessible to all Indigenous people living in urban centers across the United States.

Kresge: What impact has the COVID-19 vaccine had on Indian country?

Crevier: At NCUIH, we take great pride in our communities when it comes to immunizations and access to these essential vaccines. The NCUIH has worked from every angle to ensure that urban Indian organizations and the Indian country as a whole have access to COVID-19 vaccines as they did not receive federal resources during the H1N1 pandemic, and fortunately our efforts have been successful.

Our Indigenous parents have the highest vaccination rate for COVID-19 and that is undoubtedly because our community has come together during this time to ensure access to the vaccine. At a time when the healthcare industry is grappling with historic labor shortages, urban Indian organizations have rolled up their sleeves and kept working harder than ever. American Indians and Alaska Natives have lost more lives to this virus than any other people and we have not begun to realize the lasting impacts this will have on our communities – whether is about the loss of language, history or community. I am proud of our urban Indian leaders. Together, we were able to advocate for unprecedented resources to fight COVID-19 and saw the biggest increase in health funding for urban Indians in more than a decade. However, some urban Indians are still being left behind as several cities do not have Urban Indian Organization health care providers due to long-standing insufficient funding for urban programs. So we still have a lot of work to do.

I know I’ve shared it with you before, but it’s such a great resource that I’d be remiss if I didn’t share it again. To improve confidence in vaccines, NCUIH launched a #BeAGoodRelative campaign to increase vaccine uptake among urban American Indians and Alaska Natives. The #BeAGoodRelative campaign recently created a series of videos that have been very popular.

To learn more and download the toolkit, follow the NCUIH at Twitter, Facebook or YouTube. Please visit the NCUIH website for more information about our critical work to support the resilience of the Native American and Alaska Native community through meaningful change in social equity in health care.

Kresge: How important are partnerships and collaborations in advancing health equity for American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas?

Crevier: We have thrived on our ongoing partnerships and they play an important role in our mission as well as the impact we have in Indian Country. Recently, at our annual conference, we honored the Kresge Foundation with our “Rising Ally” award. This award recognizes an individual or organization that has established itself as a strong collaborator in Indian Country and a promoter of health care equity for urban Native Americans and Alaska Natives.

It was important for us to publicly acknowledge and acknowledge our valued partnership with the Kresge Foundation. We really appreciate your helping us spread awareness about our work and the importance of health equity for all American Indians and Alaska Natives. Partnerships and collaborations are essential to the success of our mission, and I look forward to continued collaboration in the future.

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