Event Funding – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 15:59:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://avvensanchea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6.png Event Funding – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ 32 32 Abandoned Springfield factory at center of event saluting brownfield cleanup money https://avvensanchea.com/abandoned-springfield-factory-at-center-of-event-saluting-brownfield-cleanup-money/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 14:45:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/abandoned-springfield-factory-at-center-of-event-saluting-brownfield-cleanup-money/ A gated entrance to the former 270,000 square foot Jones & Lamson Machine Co. building on Clinton Street in Springfield on Saturday, September 18, 2021. Photo by Maggie Cassidy / VTDigger Editor’s Note: This John Lippman story first appeared in the Valley News on September 17. SPRINGFIELD – A sprawling abandoned machine tool factory at […]]]>
A gated entrance to the former 270,000 square foot Jones & Lamson Machine Co. building on Clinton Street in Springfield on Saturday, September 18, 2021. Photo by Maggie Cassidy / VTDigger

Editor’s Note: This John Lippman story first appeared in the Valley News on September 17.

SPRINGFIELD – A sprawling abandoned machine tool factory at the entrance to the city center, long a ghostly reminder of the region’s economic decline, will finally be demolished and the site remediated thanks to a new state funding program to clean up some of Vermont’s worst contaminated sites. sites.

The old 270,000 square foot Jones & Lamson Machine Co. building on Clinton Street, aka Route 11, once employed 1,500 factory workers and was the crown of the Springfield manufacturing hub. It will receive approximately $ 3.7 million administered through Vermont’s Brownfield Economic Revitalization Alliance, said Bob Flint, executive director of Springfield Regional Development Corp., which owns the 14-acre property.

“It’s an understatement to say this is just another brownfield. It beats them all, ”Flint said Thursday outside the entrance to the now ivy-infested Jones & Lamson factory at an event to trick the state into setting aside money from a budget surplus. $ 210 million for brownfield cleanup. In attendance were Governor Phil Scott and other state, federal and city officials.

Flint, who has led the site’s redevelopment effort for over 15 years but has been able to make only limited progress because of the costs involved in remediation, called the state’s money a “money changer. game ”to complete the project.

“Probably all of the state’s consultants have touched it at one point or another,” he said.

The state allocated $ 25 million of the surplus for brownfield cleanup, and $ 14 million of beneficiaries were announced Thursday. The money for brownfield cleanup has historically come from US Environmental Protection Agency funds or, in some limited cases, municipal budgets, but this brownfield funding is the first time the state has used its own money, officials said Thursday.

“This presents a unique opportunity to tackle long-standing challenges and finally deliver on the promise of increasing economic equity from region to region and bringing growth to all regions of the state,” not just in Chittenden County, ”Scott said in an announcement of the recipients, which also include two sites in Burlington and one site in St. Albans.

Springfield Regional Development Corp. acquired the abandoned bankrupt Jones-Lamson property for $ 165,000.

The factory, the oldest section of which dated from 1907, was “the mother of the three great” Springfield machine tool companies, along with Fellows Gear Shaper Co. and Bryant Grinder. It closed in 1986.

Over the years, nearly $ 2.5 million, including $ 1.2 million from the EPA, has already been spent on assessments and preliminary clean-up of the site, which is contaminated with a host of industrial chemicals. toxic, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), trichlorethylene (TCE), and a light liquid in a non-aqueous phase.

State funding of $ 3.7 million will go to the Mount Ascutney Regional Commission, which contracts with Costello Dismantling of West Wareham, Massachusetts, to demolish and clean up the site. Flint said he expects work to start in a few weeks and last until at least early fall.

Although the building has been an unoccupied envelope for 35 years – the roof has collapsed in places and it is considered very dangerous to enter – Springfield Regional Development Corp. property taxes to the city.

Flint said two parts of the building would remain: approximately 10,000 square feet facing Bridge Street which was the factory’s front office, and the rear which houses LBL Fabrications and was the last section of the huge factory to be built. .

As to the type of business that could one day occupy the redeveloped site, Flint declined to elaborate, but described plans to return the site to its business roots.

“It will not be residential, and the use will be something that creates jobs and has a positive economic impact,” he said. “It won’t be a warehouse with two people working there or minimum wage jobs.”

But Flint argues that the site, next to the Black River and less than 3 miles from Interstate 91, should attract interested parties because it is “located near the freeway exit with a four-way access road. lanes, full water and sewer, one of the fastest internet systems in the country and it’s on level ground which is hard to find here.

Route 11 in Springfield on Saturday, September 18, 2021. Photo by Maggie Cassidy / VTDigger

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Westerly Council to Discuss Use of Rescue Bill Funding for Potter Hill Mill Demolition | Where is https://avvensanchea.com/westerly-council-to-discuss-use-of-rescue-bill-funding-for-potter-hill-mill-demolition-where-is/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 08:51:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/westerly-council-to-discuss-use-of-rescue-bill-funding-for-potter-hill-mill-demolition-where-is/ WEST – City council will consider committing $ 400,000 in federal COVID-19 relief funds for the demolition of the Potter Hill Mill at a meeting scheduled for Monday. The actual commitment of funds would depend on the approval by a Superior Court judge of an administrative lien that would give the city top priority to […]]]>

WEST – City council will consider committing $ 400,000 in federal COVID-19 relief funds for the demolition of the Potter Hill Mill at a meeting scheduled for Monday. The actual commitment of funds would depend on the approval by a Superior Court judge of an administrative lien that would give the city top priority to recover the funds.

As part of the plan, the $ 400,000 would come from the $ 6.6 million that authorities expect from the city under the US federal bailout law of 2021. The funds are expected to arrive in the city over the course of the year. the next two years. The proposed demolition project is expected to meet funding criteria under federal law because it would create open space that could be used by the public and “mitigate flooding,” CEO J. Mark Rooney told the council at the time. from his September conference. 13 meeting.

“We have obtained indications from grant writer and project manager Lisa Pellegrini that she would be eligible for expenditure oversight by the US Treasury Department,” Rooney told the board. Pellegrini, who was previously director of the city’s development services department, now works for the city as a grant writer and administrator.

The federal government will reimburse municipalities and other qualified entities for qualified projects using funds made available through the bailout act, said city attorney William J. Conley Jr.

The city has been trying to clean up the mill property for decades. A demolition order was issued by the city in 1980 but was never executed. A more recent effort by the city to enforce a demolition order was caught in a court battle for years before being upheld by a Superior Court judge. Yet the mill buildings continued to stand in their dilapidated state.

At the end of 2019, city council allowed John Dorsey, a lawyer, to ask a Superior Court judge to place the plant’s property in receivership, a process akin to bankruptcy. The judge upheld the town’s petition and Dorsey worked to find a solution to address the health and safety risks posed by the plant, which is located along the Pawcatuck River near the boundary from the town of Hopkinton. Renewable Resources Inc.’s efforts of property owner Edward Carapezza to redevelop the plant have failed, over the years, to gain traction.

Dorsey, at the council meeting, said he would ask a judge to grant an administrative privilege in conjunction with the proposed demolition of the factory buildings. City Councilor Philip Overton asked if the city would have a chance to recover the funds. Dorsey said he believed the city would be protected.

“From a financial point of view, I understand that any consideration of approval of an allocation of funds by the city would be conditional on the Superior Court also granting the city a priority administrative privilege, subject only to expenses. of the process, which basically works as a first lien on the property, ”Dorsey said.

The demolition of the factory buildings would likely not take place until next year after a report is completed on the historic significance of the factory, buildings and their components, Dorsey said.

Efforts are also underway to remove the dam that fed the mill, which ceased operations in the 1950s. The dam is considered a potential flood hazard and an obstacle to fish passage and recreational use of the mill. the river by kayakers and canoeists. The resolution under consideration by the council does not refer to the dam project, which is currently in the study phase.

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Major Donation Launches New Building for UW-Madison School of Computing and Data Science | Higher Education https://avvensanchea.com/major-donation-launches-new-building-for-uw-madison-school-of-computing-and-data-science-higher-education/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 20:30:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/major-donation-launches-new-building-for-uw-madison-school-of-computing-and-data-science-higher-education/ An interior rendering of a new building for the School of Computer, Data and Information Sciences. Kelly Meyerhofer | Wisconsin State Journal UW-Madison has secured a large donation to start construction of a new campus building that officials say will further consolidate the city as a growing tech hub. The recently launched School of Computing, […]]]>





An interior rendering of a new building for the School of Computer, Data and Information Sciences.


UW-Madison has secured a large donation to start construction of a new campus building that officials say will further consolidate the city as a growing tech hub.

The recently launched School of Computing, Data and Information Studies will have a new home on the corner of Orchard and University Avenue, officials said on Friday. UW-Madison will demolish two service buildings currently there to make way for the 300,000 square foot, seven story building. The estimated price is $ 225 million, which will be fully funded by the private sector.

UW-Madison Responds to Data Science Demand with New School, Major, and More Faculty

Billionaires Badgers John and Tashia Morgridge donate $ 75 million for the building and pledge an additional $ 50 million in the form of a matching grant if UW-Madison itself raises $ 50 million .

The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, the university’s patent licensing arm, is injecting the remaining $ 50 million. The donation is WARF’s largest single university building, according to spokesperson Jeanan Yasiri Moe.






Model of the CDIS building

A 3-D model of the proposed School of Computing, Data and Information building, which will be UW-Madison’s second privately funded building.


BRYCE RICHTER, UW-MADISON


Construction is expected to begin in early 2023 and UW-Madison plans to open by the end of 2024. The university has set a deadline to raise $ 50 million by the end of this school year.

“A number of people thought it was just announcing a new building,” UW-Madison Chancellor Rebecca Blank said of the event in Wisconsin on Friday. Institutes for Discovery, another campus building the Morgridges helped fund. . “It’s about more than that. It’s about starting a whole new school.”

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Biodiversity and creative projects to benefit from Council grants https://avvensanchea.com/biodiversity-and-creative-projects-to-benefit-from-council-grants/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 05:17:55 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/biodiversity-and-creative-projects-to-benefit-from-council-grants/ Ashburton District Council has donated nearly $ 25,000 to community biodiversity work which includes projects in two bicycle parks and the Awa Awa Rata reserve. Another $ 9,000 was also allocated to creative projects. The Awa Awa Rata Reserve Society received $ 7,000 from a Biodiversity Fund for Pest Traps and Ecological Assessment that aims […]]]>

Ashburton District Council has donated nearly $ 25,000 to community biodiversity work which includes projects in two bicycle parks and the Awa Awa Rata reserve. Another $ 9,000 was also allocated to creative projects.

The Awa Awa Rata Reserve Society received $ 7,000 from a Biodiversity Fund for Pest Traps and Ecological Assessment that aims to improve birdlife and forest regeneration while raising awareness of the role of pests and encouraging the next generation to value and care for the indigenous environment.

Initial plans are to plant a new kowhai grove, check 40 rat traps and 45 stoat and opossum traps, undertake wasp control and conduct a professional forest health assessment that will inform management. future.

The area contains very important native plant species, birds and insects that depend on it. It is a mixed forest containing beech, totara, rata and other small trees and shrubs, as well as native birds like bellbird, fusiliers, kereru, titmouse and fantail.

Mountain Bike Ashburton and Bike Methven each received $ 3,000 to plant native plants and / or undertake weed and pest control.

Ben and Leah Mee received $ 3,000 to control wasps along the foothills of the Ashburton District. Upper Rangitata Gorge Landcare received $ 5,300 to perform weed control in the upper Braided River, which has important fishing and habitat values.

Community event funding of $ 4,748 has been awarded to a group organizing the 150th anniversary of Rakaia School, which is scheduled for March 4-6, 2022.

Heritage funding was also available, but no project applications were received.

A total of $ 9,121 has been approved by the Creative Communities Scheme, including $ 3,000 for Christmas in the Park, a family-oriented event for local artists, musicians, singers and dancers to present to a live audience.

The Big Little Theater Company received $ 861.61 to perform a play on World Wars 1 and 2; the Ashburton Festival of Pipe Bands received $ 690; Hakatere Ceramics & Pottery received $ 1,869 to host a workshop by famous potter Fiona Tunnicliffe; Kristin Anne Dunne received $ 1,200 for directing art classes, and the Zonta Club of Ashburton Charitable Trust received $ 1,500 for their Zonta Ashburton Female Art Award.

The second round of funding for the Creative Communities Scheme will take place in March 2022.

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Wisconsin COVID Grant Applications Open for Some Businesses https://avvensanchea.com/wisconsin-covid-grant-applications-open-for-some-businesses/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:07:14 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/wisconsin-covid-grant-applications-open-for-some-businesses/ item Wisconsin Capitol in Madison MADISON, Wisconsin. – The Wisconsin Department of Administration (DOA) announced Thursday, September 16, that it is accepting applications for more than $ 33 million in grants designed to help event venues, cinemas and small live event businesses that have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, applications have been […]]]>

Wisconsin Capitol in Madison

The Wisconsin Department of Administration (DOA) announced Thursday, September 16, that it is accepting applications for more than $ 33 million in grants designed to help event venues, cinemas and small live event businesses that have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

In addition, applications have been opened for more than $ 10 million in grants for summer camps and minor league sports teams, the DOA said.

Halls, events and theaters

The Venues and Small Business Live Events grant programs will provide funding of up to $ 200,000 per eligible organization, for a total of $ 10 million and $ 12 million respectively, while the theater grant program will provide funding of up to $ 15,000 per screen, for a total of $ 11.25 million.

The funds are part of the governor’s previously announced funding of more than $ 150 million from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) for Wisconsin’s tourism and entertainment industries, including:

  • $ 10 million for local tourism investment projects;
  • $ 75 million for accommodation grants;
  • $ 11.25 million for theaters;
  • $ 12 million for small business live events;
  • $ 2.8 million for minor league sports teams;
  • $ 10 million for event venues;
  • $ 15 million for destination marketing organizations;
  • $ 8 million for summer camps;
  • $ 1 million for the Wisconsin Historical Society to help reopen historic sites; and
  • $ 7.5 million to increase marketing support for the Wisconsin tourism industry.

Grant applications launched on Thursday will be managed by the DOA and will remain open until October 15, 2021. Grant recipients will be announced later this fall.

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Additional information, including the criteria for the grant program, is available on the program’s websites:

Camps and sports

The Minor League Sports Team Grants Program will provide funding of up to $ 200,000 per eligible organization, for a total of $ 2.8 million, while the Summer Camp Grants Program will provide funding. up to $ 50,000 per qualifying organization, for a total of $ 8 million. The funds are part of the governor’s previously announced funding of more than $ 150 million from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) for Wisconsin’s tourism and entertainment industries.

Grant applications launched today will be managed by the DOA and will remain open until October 15, 2021. Information webinars and program FAQs. Grant recipients will be announced later this fall.

Additional information, including the criteria for the grant program, is available on the program’s websites:

“When it comes to pandemic assistance, the Evers administration is working to ensure that all valuable parts of our economy are supported,” DOA Secretary Joel Brennan said. “As a baseball lover and father of two, I know first-hand the invaluable opportunities that summer camps and Minor League sports teams offer our youth, and I look forward to helping these kids. organizations to bounce back. ”

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Applicants are encouraged to submit questions and check the program’s websites for updates.

For updates on other pandemic-related grant opportunities, sign up for the Badger Bounceback update list.

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Maritime Super defends spending on union events https://avvensanchea.com/maritime-super-defends-spending-on-union-events/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 05:47:37 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/maritime-super-defends-spending-on-union-events/ The fund’s annual sponsorship budget is $ 50,000, which is split between labor and management groups. A spokesperson for Maritime Super said the fund supports “selected industry events to engage with its members and promote the fund to the industry.” Loading “These expenses come from the fund’s modest marketing budget and are fully disclosed, including […]]]>

The fund’s annual sponsorship budget is $ 50,000, which is split between labor and management groups. A spokesperson for Maritime Super said the fund supports “selected industry events to engage with its members and promote the fund to the industry.”

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“These expenses come from the fund’s modest marketing budget and are fully disclosed, including to regulators,” the spokesperson said. “The retirement pensions industry is one of the most regulated industries in the country. At no time has any regulator expressed concerns to Maritime Super about our marketing activities. “

Super Consumers Australia director Xavier O’Halloran said the funding of MUA events by Maritime Super with a limited brand was “pretty bogus”, adding that event sponsorships should only be considered if they allow direct opportunities to register new members or provide information about the fund.

“If those elements are missing, it definitely raises red flags,” he said, adding that questionable brand name drills were a long-standing problem in the $ 3.3 trillion industry.

“The problem is, the funds have not been forced to justify the value of these sponsorship deals to members. This is the duty that has always applied to superannuation funds, but for too long they have not been held accountable. “

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Mr O’Halloran said event sponsorships can be justified “if they can attract more members into the fund which could grow”, but more evidence was needed. “It’s a pretty easy excuse that has been used in the past to push back on any kind of criticism of sponsorship funding. “

Maritime Super has a long-standing cross-promotion partnership with Unity Bank and offers its services, including bank loans, term deposits and credit cards, on its website. “The rates you can get from other financial services in many ways are superior,” a source said. “It’s all part of the union’s gravy train. “

A number of directors of Maritime Super, including Paddy Crumlin, Michael Doleman and Garry Kearne, have served as directors of both the fund and the bank. The fund did not respond to questions about handling potential conflicts.

Maritime Super’s board of directors and significant remunerations have remained fully intact despite the complete outsourcing of the fund’s investment management to Hostplus. Mr O’Halloran said investing is an essential part of a super fund’s mandate and called for more scrutiny of these types of transactions. “If the funds set up and outsource all of the core functions and still charge members a significant amount of money to handle expensive advice or a whole bunch of extra services, they really have to justify how that adds value to members. “

EISS Super was revealed last week to have spent its members’ retirement savings on corporate parties at the Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art and sponsorship deals with close ties to senior staff. Chief Executive Alex Hutchison abruptly resigned amid what he called a “calculated smear campaign”.

The federal government has introduced new laws to ensure that all super fund spending is in the best financial interest of members, with the goal of cracking down on excessive sponsorship and marketing budgets. APRA sent letters this year to 20 super funds suspected of overspending.

Liberal MP Tim Wilson now plans to bring top EISS Super executives to the government’s economic committee to probe the value these deals have brought to members and what processes were used to assess the financial benefits.

MUA declined to comment.

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Reports of Abnormal Periods After COVID-19 Vaccinations Prompt NIH to Grant Funding to Study Potential Link | Coronavirus https://avvensanchea.com/reports-of-abnormal-periods-after-covid-19-vaccinations-prompt-nih-to-grant-funding-to-study-potential-link-coronavirus/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 21:49:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/reports-of-abnormal-periods-after-covid-19-vaccinations-prompt-nih-to-grant-funding-to-study-potential-link-coronavirus/ Months after people started sharing their stories of abnormal periods after COVID-19 vaccination online, clinical research into a potential link is about to begin. The National Institutes of Health announced this week that they have awarded funding to five institutions to study whether coronavirus vaccines cause changes in menstruation. The additional one-year grants, totaling $ […]]]>

Months after people started sharing their stories of abnormal periods after COVID-19 vaccination online, clinical research into a potential link is about to begin.

The National Institutes of Health announced this week that they have awarded funding to five institutions to study whether coronavirus vaccines cause changes in menstruation.

The additional one-year grants, totaling $ 1.67 million, were awarded to Boston University, Harvard Medical School, Johns Hopkins University, Michigan State University and at Oregon Health and Science University, according to the NIH press release.

Medical experts say abnormal periods following a COVID-19 vaccine are not a safety concern, a reason not to get the vaccine, or a sign of infertility.

The studies plan to establish whether there is a correlation between irregular periods and Pfizer, Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines, and if so, why the change is occurring, according to Dr Diana Bianchi, director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute. of Child Health and Human Development, a branch of the NIH that funds the study.

Although no link has been made so far, Bianchi said it was “biologically feasible” due to the way the shot generates an immune response in the body. She added that the number of people who may experience abnormal periods after inoculation is not yet known.

The NIH-funded studies come after an investigation focused on collecting anecdotal reports of people’s menstruation experiences after COVID-19 vaccinations garnered a lot of attention on social media and among researchers. The survey, launched in April and led by Kathryn Clancy, associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Katharine Lee, postdoctoral researcher at the Washington University School of Medicine, counts to date more than 150,000 questioned person.

Clancy and Lee told the Tribune in April that they created the survey because of their own experiences with abnormal periods after their inoculations. The investigation is open to anyone over the age of 18 who has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and who has had or is having menstrual cycles.

Clancy recently tweeted that they applied for the NIH grant but did not get funding.

Bianchi said the NIH issued a special notice to fund clinical studies after seeing online reports of people reporting irregular periods as well as seeing a “sharp gap” in the evidence.

Despite reports earlier this month that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had started research into abnormal menstruation after vaccination, the institution is not conducting further research into the 1,589 incidents of “menstrual irregularity. “that were recorded in its reporting system,” said Martha Sharan, public affairs officer for the CDC’s vaccine task force.

“At this time, the CDC sees no safety issues that warrant additional monitoring for irregular menstrual symptoms reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System,” Sharan said in an email to the Tribune.

Sharan said the reports, recorded through the end of July, represent “a very small number,” given the more than 300 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines that have been administered.

Bianchi said that although the CDC’s numbers are low, the actual number of people experiencing abnormal periods after a vaccine injection may be much higher because the system relies on people responding to them voluntarily.

“I would bet most people don’t even know it,” Bianchi said.

Reports made to the CDC system are consistent with symptoms that have been more widely discussed online.

“I was due for my menstrual cycle, but when it happened I started to bleed profusely. It’s not a norm for me – my period is usually light with spotting at the start of my cycle, ”a COVID-19 vaccine recipient told the CDC system. “It was so heavy when it started on Friday that I bled through my pants.”

“I’m in menopause and haven’t had a period for 18 months. Within 72 hours of the vaccine, I had a light period which lasted 24 hours, ”said another.

The NIH-funded studies will be prospective, Bianchi said. They will include a control group and monitor for potential changes in menstruation in people who have not yet been vaccinated after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine. One problem with the existing information regarding COVID-19 vaccines and irregular periods is that everything has been retrospective, she said.

The lack of information available on potential changes in the period before vaccinations begin to be given to the general public has contributed to a fear that “didn’t need to be there,” said Nicole Woitowich, assistant professor of research at the Feinberg School at Northwestern University. of medicine, who added that this has also led to a “mistrust gap”.

“I think what really confused people was that they were totally taken by surprise because they weren’t told that they would be having the most painful time of their life, for example.” , said Bianchi.

Bianchi and Woitowich said the lack of information had also fueled fears surrounding infertility. There is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines affect fertility, Bianchi said, and the injections have been shown to be safe for pregnant people, according to the CDC. Earlier this month, the CDC urged pregnant women to get vaccinated.

The combination of these factors likely led to increased hesitation about the vaccine, Woitowich said.

“The myth has escalated with the misinformation surrounding infertility, I think it’s a double whammy and can really prevent some people from getting vaccinated,” she said.

Bianchi said the reason there probably wasn’t a study on the vaccine’s effect on menstruation in the first trials last fall was because it was a situation of emergency in which they were only looking for major complications. But she added: “It really wouldn’t be that difficult to add a few questions specifically focused on women’s health.

For Woitowich, the lack of consideration of health issues that affect women and menstruating people in vaccine trials was probably also due to the historically male-dominated culture of biomedical research.

“Maybe people think that only women’s menstrual cycles are not a big concern,” Woitowich said. These problems are exacerbated when it comes to gender nonconforming people, she added.

In comments to the Twitter feed in February that kicked off Clancy and Lee’s investigation, some of the people who were discussing their experiences with abnormal periods were identified as transgender or non-binary.

“People belonging to gender minorities have their own social determinants of health which, again, are not taken into account when we do not consider gender as a variable in research studies,” said Woitowich. . “So we are harming these people by not taking into account precisely the influence of gender on health and disease.”

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The Summit Foundation organizes the 34th edition of the Great Rubber Duck Race https://avvensanchea.com/the-summit-foundation-organizes-the-34th-edition-of-the-great-rubber-duck-race/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/the-summit-foundation-organizes-the-34th-edition-of-the-great-rubber-duck-race/ Spectators watch thousands of rubber ducks float down the Blue River at Breckenridge on Saturday September 4th. The ducks are part of the Great Rubber Duck Race organized by the Summit Foundation.Jenna deJong / Summit Daily News The Summit Foundation has been Summit County’s largest cheerleader since the 1980s. Since then, it has distributed over […]]]>
Spectators watch thousands of rubber ducks float down the Blue River at Breckenridge on Saturday September 4th. The ducks are part of the Great Rubber Duck Race organized by the Summit Foundation.
Jenna deJong / Summit Daily News

The Summit Foundation has been Summit County’s largest cheerleader since the 1980s. Since then, it has distributed over $ 45 million in grants to nonprofits and scholarships to students, and part of that money was raised during the Great Rubber Duck Race, a must-see community event that has been around for 34 years.

The organization hosted the event virtually last year, but Executive Director Jeanne Bistranin and Director of Events and Marketing Brian Balok agreed it hadn’t made as much noise as in normal years. Balok said the event usually draws a large crowd because of its tradition, but also because it’s a way of giving back.

“People really appreciate it,” Balok said. “It’s Labor Day weekend too, so they have time to go out and check it out. It is mainly for the tradition and also because they know that it helps the community. This is our biggest fundraiser of the year, so we’re so excited to be getting out here.



The day started on Saturday September 4 with a race for children 12 and under. Ducks cost $ 10. The next race was a “trade battle” where local businesses bought a duck for $ 100. The last race, and the grand finale, was the Great Duck Race. The ducks cost $ 5 and the winner received a grand prize of $ 1,500.

The races are not a joke either. Balok said the children’s run typically receives around 400 to 700 rubber ducks, the commercial battle 300 to 400, and the big run around 10,000. The ducks are released at Maggie Pond in Breckenridge, where they descend the Blue River along. from the Blue River Plaza. To help the ducks on their journey, volunteers paddle board or wade through the shallow river to help those who are stuck or moving slowly.



The winners of each race received various awards from local businesses, including a VIP snowcat tour at Keystone Resort. Other prizes included ski passes and gift certificates for restaurants and spas.

This year, Bistranin said the organization has sold more than 10,000 ducks for the Great Race, 861 ducks for the children’s race and 260 business fighting ducks. In total, the organization raised over $ 140,000.

With prizes like these and the expectation to see 10,000 rubber ducks float down the river, it’s no wonder this is the organization’s biggest event of the year. Bistranin said that this particular event typically earns around $ 150,000, sometimes more. Other sources of funding for the community foundation come from its ski medallion program, which Bistranin says accounts for about 40% of the organization’s total funding. It also receives donations from 3,600 donors, 26 companies and other events such as its annual golf tournament.

With all of these funding sources, the organization is able to support many different causes in the community, such as arts and culture, health and social services, youth development, and environmental causes. In addition to supporting Summit County, the foundation even supports Fairplay, Kremmling and Leadville, where many Summit County workers live.

Among all of these causes, Bistranin said the organization is a leader in supporting education and working families, but over the past year has particularly focused on disaster relief efforts. pandemic.

“Over the past year and a half, we’ve been laser-focused on COVID relief,” Bistranin said. “We had our Summit County Cares fund that met basic COVID relief needs, and it was $ 850,000 that the community donated to us and that we gave directly to nonprofits in the community. It met basic needs like food, mental health, child care, and whatever else people needed. “

In addition to this fund, the organization also offered a series of additional grants to all of its nonprofits, amounting to an additional $ 700,000.

According to the Summit Foundation’s annual report for 2020, the organization has donated more than $ 4.5 million to the community. Of this, 74 nonprofit organizations received grants.

Balok said it’s this level of support that makes the Summit Foundation a vital part of the community.

“We have a big impact in the community. Whatever we do, we are always focused on supporting all different aspects of the community, be it the frontline workers, the (Family and Intercultural Resource Center), updating the trails … we cover it all. .

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Osseo Moves Forward with Grant to Reconstruct Central Avenue | Local News https://avvensanchea.com/osseo-moves-forward-with-grant-to-reconstruct-central-avenue-local-news/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/osseo-moves-forward-with-grant-to-reconstruct-central-avenue-local-news/ Osseo City Council approved a grant that will be used for part of the costs of the Central Avenue reconstruction project at its August 23 meeting. In March, the city received a $ 100,000 Hennepin County Community Development Block grant to use for the project, which includes the reconstruction of Central Avenue in front of […]]]>

Osseo City Council approved a grant that will be used for part of the costs of the Central Avenue reconstruction project at its August 23 meeting.

In March, the city received a $ 100,000 Hennepin County Community Development Block grant to use for the project, which includes the reconstruction of Central Avenue in front of City Hall, as well as sidewalks in front of the town hall and Steeple Pointe. For pedestrian safety, two sets of rectangular rapid flashing lights will be installed along Central Avenue at the intersections of Fourth Avenue and Fifth Avenue.

The total cost of the project is $ 307,698.

According to city administrator Riley Grams, the city has now received a sub-recipient agreement, which stipulates certain requirements. These requirements may include documents, fair wages, and other contract terms that the city must meet during the project to receive funding.

The deal with the county needs permission from the city council to go ahead.

The board approved the authorization to execute the sub-recipient agreement with the Urban Hennepin County Community Development Block Program.

Construction of the Central Avenue reconstruction project is scheduled from September 13 to October 31. Landscaping will be done in October.

The council also discussed the use of masks inside city buildings.

“We have seen a spike in delta variant COVID cases here in the Twin Cities,” Grams said. “Based on this, two council members have now contacted me to ask if the city should consider masks for interior buildings owned by the city. “

He said he contacted staff in surrounding towns in Hennepin County to see if they had mask warrants for the town’s buildings. According to Grams, only the cities of Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park have indoor mask requirements.

Grams said he contacted the emergency management team to see if they wanted to make a recommendation on the masks. “In the end, they decided that the recommendation would be to strongly encourage masks,” he said. “We put up road signs. We could even put disposable masks at the reception desk. “

Grams provided the council with some requirements if it were to implement a new masking mandate inside city buildings. masks compulsory in the Senior Center.

Councilor Larry Stelmach said he had no problem with a sign that said masks are encouraged. He did not think that a city mandate was necessary as there is no state mandate currently in place. “I do not support the idea of ​​forcing someone to wear a mask if they do not want to in this public building,” he added.

Councilor Alicia Vickerman said she could see many sides to the discussion.

“This conversation is happening everywhere,” she said, adding that she “has yet to put the mask away”. “I have young children who don’t have access to a vaccine.

Vickerman said she would like to see stronger encouragement for people to wear a mask in a public place, such as City Hall.

Councilor Juliana Hultstrom agreed to strongly encourage people to wear masks inside city buildings. She said she was concerned about the upcoming Osseo Kids Halloween event at the community center where hundreds of people attend and the halls are packed.

Councilor Harold Johnson said that because the variant is spreading and Hennepin County requires people inside its buildings to be masked, the town of Osseo should also have a warrant.

“I can imagine that most people will take their precautions themselves,” said Mayor Duane Poppe. “You can mandate whatever you want, but people will or will not do what they can to protect their children.”

The council has decided to have signs around buildings in the city stating that masks are strongly encouraged and provide masks to those who want one.

In another action, the advice:

APPROVED the promotion of Police Officer Adrianne Lamers from part-time to full-time.

APPROVED the hiring of Brendan Current as a part-time police officer. Even though Current left his full-time job to move to another department, he said he would like to stay with the Osseo Police Department as a part-time constable.

Follow Osseo-Maple Grove Press on Facebook @OsseoMapleGrovePress

Copyright © 2021 at Sun Newspapers / APG Media of East Central Minnesota. Digital distribution of this content without prior written consent is a violation of federal law and may be subject to legal action.

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Column: Arena deals for Kraken and Coyotes teach lesson in public funding and economic impact | Kraken https://avvensanchea.com/column-arena-deals-for-kraken-and-coyotes-teach-lesson-in-public-funding-and-economic-impact-kraken/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/column-arena-deals-for-kraken-and-coyotes-teach-lesson-in-public-funding-and-economic-impact-kraken/ SEATTLE – Eight years ago this summer, I was in Glendale, Ariz., Watching city council members debate the future of the NHL regional team and whether they should risk the Coyotes being transferred. in Seattle. At the time, New York investment banker Ray Bartoszek claimed he was set to move the Coyotes overnight, with the […]]]>

SEATTLE – Eight years ago this summer, I was in Glendale, Ariz., Watching city council members debate the future of the NHL regional team and whether they should risk the Coyotes being transferred. in Seattle.

At the time, New York investment banker Ray Bartoszek claimed he was set to move the Coyotes overnight, with the alleged NHL blessing, unless the board approves a new lease for the team at what is now called Gila River Arena.

Well, the board at the time, as politicians often do under pressure from sports teams and leagues, voted 4-3 to keep the Coyotes rather than calling Bartoszek’s bluff to have them temporarily play the game. KeyArena while Seattle figured out how to build a better venue later.

Still, considering what happened over the past week, we can say that Seattle has emerged as the long-term winner of this bizarre and tumultuous summer’s NHL events.

Glendale initially lost millions on what has become arguably the worst arena rental in North American sports.

Meanwhile, Seattle has not only since won its own NHL team in the Kraken, but a fully private over $ 1 billion overhaul of KeyArena in what is now the Climate Pledge Arena.

So, unlike 2013, there is no need for additional arenas here.

This is not the case in Arizona, where Glendale informed the Coyotes last week that he would end what has become a modified year-on-year lease and want them to leave his city-funded arena. by the state by June 30, 2022.

The team has long sought public funding for a new arena in the greater Phoenix area, where existing venues are not really suited to NHL play.

There is, mind you, a relatively new arena, adapted to the NHL, which also emerged as an alternative to the Coyotes in 2013, but this one is 2,700 miles away.

The Center Vidéotron de Québec was under construction at the time – also with significant public funding – and finally opened in 2015 and, unfortunately, has waited in vain for a return to the NHL since then.

Either way, that’s not our problem. While Glendale and Quebec both suffered financial blows in the name of love for the NHL, our city got the equivalent of a billion dollar arena paid for privately by developer Oak View Group (OVG ) and its partners.

The town has also secured income guarantees to avoid the annual financial losses that have plagued Glendale.

Still, in a funny twist – depending on your sense of humor – a Seattle native helped ignite Glendale’s push to finally end his relationship with the Coyotes.

Kevin Phelps, a former Seattle businessman and former assistant manager for Pierce County, was hired in November 2015 to take on the key role of city manager for Glendale.

His hiring came shortly after the Seahawks played and lost a Super Bowl at Glendale to the New England Patriots in February 2015.

Glendale, then tired of the Coyotes saga, had started playing hardball with the sports leagues and as a result nearly all Super Bowl events that year were moved by the NFL to neighboring Phoenix.

In mid-2015, Glendale, citing a conflict of interest by a former city lawyer hired by the Coyotes after the 2013 vote, terminated the massively unfavorable lease and reverted to the current annual renewal which offers no guarantees that the team will stay.

Faced with a prime tenant actively seeking to leave and knowing that even more public money will soon be needed for major arena infrastructure upgrades, Phelps commissioned an analysis from the based consulting firm Applied Economics. in Phoenix to determine exactly what the Coyotes generate in municipal tax revenue.

“My responsibility is, if they leave, what should I do with a large enough asset (arena)? Phelps told me this week. “And so we looked at this saying, ‘How can we survive without hockey? “

The study looked at the spending habits of patrons of the arena and the adjacent Westgate Entertainment District shopping, bar and restaurant complex during the Coyotes’ home games compared to an average of 17 annual concerts held there.

And the results released last week have garnered a lot of attention.

Sarah Murley, director of Applied Economics, concluded that spectator expenses were “considerably higher than for Coyotes events”: $ 58 per person versus $ 27.

Murley attributed this to the fact that concerts are a “special event” in which attendees linger longer and are more likely to stay overnight at nearby hotels.

The Coyotes’ long-standing problem is that much of the fan base that buys tickets lives in wealthy Scottsdale and other communities.

Distant Glendale has no public transit, meaning hockey fans would often drive 45 minutes or more in rush hour traffic jams to get to midweek games, grab a quick bite to eat at the arena and then returned home immediately after.

The study found that even dropping the Coyotes’ 43 seasonal hosting dates, the city could still generate just as much tax revenue by adding 20 more concerts of at least 10,000 fans each.

“It certainly became clear that not only would we be able to survive,” said Phelps, “but that we would actually be better off financially than being tied to the 43 dates a year that we tie up in the arena.”

Just booking those dates, he added, required blocking 200 nights a year until the NHL released its exact schedule.

Now, these dates being free, the city can more easily book concerts well in advance.

“The speculation in the media was that I was trying to increase our influence to get them to sign a long-term lease,” Phelps said of the severing of ties. “And that’s not the case. We’ve made a decision that what’s in our best interest is to be able to go more aggressively after more impactful types of events. “

And that’s the lesson Glendale and countless other municipalities have learned the hard way about public money for professional sports teams and infrastructure.

There are almost always things with a greater “impact” for local governments to invest in.

It’s a very different story here, where the Kraken – not the city – will be the entity that holds the proverbial sack if the NHL product isn’t a smash hit.

The owners of the Kraken and development partners of OVG have already spent $ 1.7 billion on the arena, the team and its training center.

In other words, unlike Glendale, our local politicians designed this arena deal so that our NHL team had every incentive to stick around for the long haul to recoup their vast investment.

And the city, with its guaranteed shutdown soon to start pouring in, has no incentive to let the Kraken go.

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