Music Organization – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 17:59:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://avvensanchea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6.png Music Organization – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ 32 32 Announcing the 2023 Pasadena Showcase House of Design – Pasadena Weekendr https://avvensanchea.com/announcing-the-2023-pasadena-showcase-house-of-design-pasadena-weekendr/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 17:59:45 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/announcing-the-2023-pasadena-showcase-house-of-design-pasadena-weekendr/ Stewart House watercolor print. Courtesy of Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts After a triumphant return earlier this year to South Pasadena, the Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts today announced the dates and location for the 2023 Pasadena Showcase House of Design, one of the most popular home and garden tours ever. oldest, largest […]]]>

Stewart House watercolor print. Courtesy of Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts

After a triumphant return earlier this year to South Pasadena, the Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts today announced the dates and location for the 2023 Pasadena Showcase House of Design, one of the most popular home and garden tours ever. oldest, largest and most successful in the country. The 58th Showcase House will reimagine Stewart House, a grand 1933 colonial estate with spectacular square footage in a historic Pasadena neighborhood. Showcase House public tours will take place from April 23 to May 21, 2023. Golden Tickets are on sale now.

“We feel incredibly fortunate to feature the Stewart House as our 2023 Pasadena Showcase House of Design,” said Vikki Sung, 2022/23 President of the Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts. “Introduced in 1983 as the 19th Maison Vitrine, we are revisiting this incredible property, run by the same family for nearly forty years, to reintroduce this majestic estate to a new generation.”

Designed by Marston & Maybury, one of Pasadena’s most celebrated architectural partnerships, Stewart House harkens back to the days of graceful architecture and the quintessential showcase with over 11,000 square feet of living space located on two acres of carefully landscaped and immaculately maintained grounds. Learn about the history of Stewart House.

After just four months of renovation, more than 25,000 guests will visit the more than 30 interior and landscape design spaces highlighting cutting-edge lifestyle trends. Guests can expect the famous Shops at Showcase, offering a variety of boutiques and craft vendors, as well as several on-site restaurants offering hot meals, grab-and-go snacks, as well as beer, wine and drinks. cocktails. Entertainment and programming is planned throughout the event featuring local musicians, speakers, special tours, and more.

The Pasadena Showcase House of Design is the primary fundraising benefit for the Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts, an all-volunteer nonprofit organization. In the 2021/22 program year, the organization donated $500,000 to local nonprofits supporting music and arts programs and, since 1948, has donated more than $24 million. .

Golden Tickets (valid any day or time) are now on sale and can be purchased at pasadenashowcase.org/tickets. Timed entry tickets will go on sale in early February.

Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts, an all-volunteer nonprofit organization, has supported local music and arts programs since 1948. Throughout its history, Pasadena Showcase has given more than $24 million to nonprofits, including through its Gifts & Grants program, in support of music education, scholarships, concerts, and music therapy, while continuing to support the LA Phil and its learning programs for which the organization was founded. Pasadena Showcase also promotes the study and appreciation of music in young people with its three annual music programs: the Music MobileTM, which introduced orchestral instruments to more than 125,000 third-grade students; the Instrumental Competition, which awarded more than $650,000 in monetary prizes to exceptionally talented young musicians; and the Youth Concert, which brought nearly 250,000 fourth-grade students to the Walt Disney Concert Hall for exuberant performances presented by the LA Phil.



Post views:
1,253

]]>
After Little Village, Lawndale residents turned away, Park District approves changes to permit process for large-scale events https://avvensanchea.com/after-little-village-lawndale-residents-turned-away-park-district-approves-changes-to-permit-process-for-large-scale-events/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 23:10:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/after-little-village-lawndale-residents-turned-away-park-district-approves-changes-to-permit-process-for-large-scale-events/ After months of pushback from community members concerned about mega festivals taking over a neighborhood park, the Chicago Park District is implementing changes to the permitting process. Events with 10,000 or more attendees per day will now need to receive approval from the District Board of Commissioners before the permit is issued, according to the […]]]>

After months of pushback from community members concerned about mega festivals taking over a neighborhood park, the Chicago Park District is implementing changes to the permitting process.

Events with 10,000 or more attendees per day will now need to receive approval from the District Board of Commissioners before the permit is issued, according to the Park District. The change, which was first introduced in September and followed by a public comment period, is intended to add a layer of transparency to the permitting process for large events, according to a Chicago Park District press release.

The change was passed unanimously at Wednesday’s Council of Commissioners meeting. Chicago Park District Board Chairman Myetie Hamilton said at Wednesday’s meeting that the public submitted 52 comments regarding the changes, with about half in favor of the amendment, according to a recording of the meeting.

Others told the board they would like the district to lower the 10,000 attendee threshold, some want the district to have a dedicated concert hall, and others raised concerns about adding bureaucracy, Hamilton said summarizing the comments during Wednesday’s meeting.

The changes come after members of the community of Little Village and Lawndale pushed back the number of large-scale music festivals that used Douglass Park, which connects West Side communities. Residents estimated that they lost access to part of the park for more than 40 days during the summer due to music festivals. Community members, who have held protests and their own music festival, have called on artists to drop out of Riot Fest.

The Park District had already made some changes to large events, requiring event organizers to have a community engagement plan, according to the district. At a meeting in September, Chicago Park District Superintendent and General Manager Rosa Escareño said she was not yet happy with the rollout of community plans.

“The point of a lot of these events is really to provide opportunities for entertainment and engagement in the communities – these communities often don’t have those opportunities,” Escareño said of the large-scale events in the parks. public. “So we want to make sure that we preserve that and improve on that, but it’s so critical to make sure that we include the voice of the community.”

Anton Adkins, who lives near Douglass Park and has spoken out about festivals before, said he thought the changes could be a step in the right direction. He said he wanted to make sure that permit decisions include transparency, and he would like the district to prioritize the community over the profits a festival might generate, he said.

“Kind of a way where — when the community gives feedback, there’s real value given to the words of the community members and not just a show,” Adkins said.

Karina Solano, community organizer at Únete La Villita, said the community organization will monitor the implementation of the changes as there are doubts that it will address their concerns. They continue to push for mega festivals like Riot Fest to leave Douglass Park for good, she said.

“It’s been a model where there’s been a lot of listening, and just listening in itself isn’t justice,” Solano said.

Some of the concerns include how the council will collect community feedback, noting that many residents of the Little Village and Lawndale communities cannot submit feedback online, Solano said. They also want limits to promoters donate to politicians it could potentially end up influencing decisions, she said.

Juanita Irizarry, executive director of Friends of the Parks, said the change shows progress in the district listening to community concerns. Yet she also said there were questions about how much weight the commissioners would give to community input.

Irizarry said they are also continuing to seek other solutions to address residents’ concerns, such as continuing discussions on the possibility of having a centralized location where the city could host major music festivals. She also said Friends of the Parks has also thought about what a community benefits agreement would look like for communities that host mega festivals.

“There may be times when having a particular festival in a particular park might not be a bad thing under the right conditions,” she said. “How could there be a real conversation between Park District, the community and the developer and the alderman or whoever else needs to be in that conversation.”

Elvia Malagón’s reporting on social justice and income inequality is made possible by a grant from the Chicago Community Trust.

]]>
“King Roger” at the Chicago Opera Theater receives help from the Polish community https://avvensanchea.com/king-roger-at-the-chicago-opera-theater-receives-help-from-the-polish-community/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/king-roger-at-the-chicago-opera-theater-receives-help-from-the-polish-community/ Like so many performers during the COVID-19 lockdown, Lidiya Yankovskaya fantasized about how her company, the Chicago Opera Theater, would emerge from the pandemic. “The plan was to come out of the pandemic with something big that took advantage of the things that only live music can offer,” she says. This wish culminates on November […]]]>

Like so many performers during the COVID-19 lockdown, Lidiya Yankovskaya fantasized about how her company, the Chicago Opera Theater, would emerge from the pandemic.

“The plan was to come out of the pandemic with something big that took advantage of the things that only live music can offer,” she says.

This wish culminates on November 18 and 20 with COT’s local premiere of “King Roger”, composed in 1924 by Karol Szymanowski to a libretto by his cousin, Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz (whose literary pseudonym was Eleuter). The opera is based on the true story of King Roger II, who ruled Sicily and North Africa from 1105 to 1130 and is remembered for his religious, racial and linguistic tolerance in the lands of his rule. .

“King Roger” has rarely been performed in the United States. Her first stumbling block is the forces needed to perform it – the same thing that attracted Yankovskaya to opera in the first place. COT’s performance features a massive choir of more than 120 Chicago-area singers, anchored by chamber choristers from Together Readthe Polish performing arts company from Chicago.

“King Roger” also requires all of these performers to sing in Polish – a tall order for a language that is almost sidelined in opera pedagogy.

In addition to the backing vocalists from Lira, two Polish singers headline the COT production: baritone Mariusz Godlewski (King Roger) and soprano Iwona Sobotka (Queen Roxana). Like everyone else, luckily COT has a talented coach in Assistant Conductor Michael Pecak, who grew up in a Polish-speaking family on the North West Side and has led Polish diction workshops at other music broadcasters. To help non-Polish performers, Pecak recorded himself saying the entire libretto, created a full English translation, and sent a phonetic guide for the piece.

“Polish is known for its dense consonant clusters, which are unlike anything we have in English,” Pecak said. “I approach (training Polish) the same way as when I train the more standard classical operatic languages ​​like Italian or French. But it’s one thing to know how to pronounce the words, and it’s It’s quite another to sing them.

Lira Ensemble Founder, Artistic Director and CEO Lucyna Migala agrees.

“I’ve heard ‘King Roger’ in concert before, in Poland, and I’d say it’s a medium-difficult piece. But it’s very difficult if you don’t speak Polish,” she said.

A third possible reason for the long-standing neglect of “King Roger” here may be the homoerotic undercurrents in the story of Szymanowski and Iwaszkiewicz. Both Szymanowski and Iwaszkiewicz left traces of their attraction to men; the former was apparently inspired to stage his next opera in medieval Sicily after his own travels across the Mediterranean, which marked a turning point in embracing his own sexuality. In their retelling of the story of King Roger, the monarch’s openness is tested by the arrival of a charismatic young shepherd who ideologically seduces him into paganism.

Some stagings emphasize this subtext more than others. When speaking to the Tribune, tenor Tyrone Chambers II – a COT regular singing as Shepherd for this month’s production – had just returned from a ‘King Roger’ production in Cottbus, Germany, in which the sexual tension between the two characters had been played out thoroughly.

Tyrone Chambers sings during a rehearsal for the Chicago Opera Theater's production of King Roger on November 7, 2022.

Chambers said he planned a more elliptical rendition for the COT production, allowing the audience to come to their own conclusions about the nature of the Shepherd’s relationship with King Roger.

“I hope what (audiences) will see is a closeness between men that is possible without sex – the kind of intimacy that women are allowed to have, and that men in some cultures still have, but that we don’t see in Western settings,” he said.

Adding yet another layer, director Dylan Evans and artist Edward Cabral’s semi-stage concept is full of Greco-Roman allusions, particularly the duality between Apollonian austerity (represented by King Roger and his court) and Dionysian sensuality (embodied by the shepherd). Cabral’s original masks for the production are inspired by murals found in the ruins of Pompeii.

“A lot of my work is neoclassical, and we’re both big fans of ancient history,” said Cabral, who is also married to Wells. “We’ve been together for eight years, and I think this is our fourth collaboration together. It’s not our first run around the block.

Nor is it that of Lira Ensemble. Founded in 1965 and officially incorporated in 1976, Lira is not only the only American performing arts company specializing in Polish arts and dance, it is possibly the oldest ethnic arts organization in the Midwest.

Whenever the classical Chicago mainstream has elevated Polish composers and music, Lira has, without fail, been a rallying force behind the scenes. Migala recalls that the Poles of Chicago invaded the Orchestra Hall by the hundreds in 1983 to hear Witold Lutosławski’s first Symphony No. 3, now considered one of the seminal symphonies of the 20th century. At an after-show party hosted by Lira, Lutosławski was evidently touched by the enthusiastic reception.

“At one point he was still sitting there at 3 a.m. I said, ‘Maestro, aren’t you tired?’ He said, ‘No, I’m not tired. I am in paradise. I have all the energy in the world, because of what happened here in Chicago,” recalls Migala.

“It was a day I will never forget. And I don’t think he forgot it until the day he died.

From left, conductor Lidiya Yankovskaya and assistant conductor Michael Pecak chat with Polish singers Iwona Sobotka and Mariusz Godlewski during a rehearsal for the Chicago Opera Theater's production of King Roger.

COT and Lira expect an equally enthusiastic presentation at these performances, the belated Chicago premiere of “King Roger.” The production’s coincidence with Poland’s Independence Day on November 11, as well as COT’s upcoming 50th anniversary, only stalls.

“At the beginning, we were just a bunch of children singing,” says Migala of Lira’s debut. “Chicago is the city where most of the people from southern Poland came, and most of the people who came were of peasant origin. I am very proud to be of peasant origin. … My parents’ life came to fruition.

Chicago Opera Theater’s “King Roger” is at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 18 and 3 p.m. Nov. 20 at the Harris Theater, 205 E. Randolph St; tickets $25-$65 at chicagooperatheater.org

Hannah Edgar is a freelance writer.

The Rubin Institute for Music Criticism helps fund our coverage of classical music. The Chicago Tribune maintains editorial control over assignments and content.

]]>
OnPoint Community Credit Union Oregon Winterfest Returns to Redmond Expo Center February 17-19 https://avvensanchea.com/onpoint-community-credit-union-oregon-winterfest-returns-to-redmond-expo-center-february-17-19/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 21:33:37 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/onpoint-community-credit-union-oregon-winterfest-returns-to-redmond-expo-center-february-17-19/ BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) – Over the past two decades, the OnPoint Community Credit Union Oregon WinterFest has grown into the largest winter festival in the Pacific Northwest, and it’s back on holiday weekend Presidents 2023! The three-day event returns to the Deschutes Expo Center in Redmond, February 17-19, 2023. The upcoming 2023 OnPoint Community Credit […]]]>

BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) – Over the past two decades, the OnPoint Community Credit Union Oregon WinterFest has grown into the largest winter festival in the Pacific Northwest, and it’s back on holiday weekend Presidents 2023! The three-day event returns to the Deschutes Expo Center in Redmond, February 17-19, 2023.

The upcoming 2023 OnPoint Community Credit Union Oregon WinterFest will brighten up the winter season with lights, live music, art, food, drink, shopping and entertainment for the whole family.

The festivities begin on Friday, February 17, with live music kicking off Friday night on the Oregrown Indoor Main Stage. Popular country and hip-hop music acts (to be announced soon) will take the stage with plenty of room to dance and sing along, with two acts on Friday and Saturday nights. Meanwhile, on the Sparks Outdoor Stage, local musicians of various genres will entertain festival-goers Friday through Sunday, surrounded by fire pits and light art.

The all-new indoor Royal Lounge will include a stage for additional musical performances, seasonal shopping with various local and regional vendors, and gourmet artisan food and drink. Gourmands will be able to delight their palates all weekend long with regional wines and epicurean delicacies.

Other heated indoor activities include the Wonderland Marketplace, where businesses and service organizations will showcase goods and merchandise including clothing, food and other products. This huge indoor shopping area will also feature dozens of regional and local artisans displaying their artwork and other unique handcrafted products, from fine woodwork to handcrafted jewelry to paintings.

Festival-goers will be able to stock up for their winter activities at the outdoor Cascades Market, where the latest snow sports apparel and outdoor accessories will be available for purchase along with other unique gifts.

Warm up next to a vibrant fireplace and marvel at unique fire sculptures, or watch ice sculptors turn blocks of ice into intricate masterpieces. More than a dozen artists will sculpt throughout the weekend, creating distinctive pieces for each day of the event. Festival-goers can peruse all of the sculptures each day in an outdoor gallery tent.

Be enchanted by the Central Oregon Light Art exhibit, featuring light art from the Holiday Light Experience. You will pass through millions of dazzling lights illuminating each area of ​​the festival.

Young children have a space just for them in the Family Play Zone. There will be bouncy houses and other kid-focused booths with fun activities and memorabilia. Kids can also participate in the Mini Marshmallow Run or hang out with the OMSI (Oregon Museum of Science and Industry) puzzle challenges.

A new element of the festival for 2023 is the start of the hot chocolate race (adults only) on Sunday 19 February. Costumes are encouraged for this fun 5K, which culminates in a hot chocolate bar complete with all the toppings and the option to add a splash of Crater Lake liquor. Each year, a portion of the proceeds from the OnPoint Community Credit Union Oregon WinterFest is donated to a local nonprofit organization. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon returns as a 2023 grantee. Big Brothers Big Sisters provides one-on-one mentorship to children who need supportive role models. The organization provides more than 100 volunteers to the OnPoint Community Credit Union Oregon WinterFest. More information is available online at www.oregonwinterfest.comincluding applications to be a vendor or volunteer at this year’s event and to purchase tickets, which include four-family packs and one-day-only admissions.

]]>
Steve Poltz performs benefits for non-profit Carlsbad https://avvensanchea.com/steve-poltz-performs-benefits-for-non-profit-carlsbad/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 00:11:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/steve-poltz-performs-benefits-for-non-profit-carlsbad/ SOLANA BEACH — Nashville-based singer-songwriter Steve Poltz will return to San Diego on Thursday, Nov. 10 for a concert at Belly Up in Solana Beach to benefit the nonprofit Carlsbad Adapt Functional Movement Center. All proceeds from the concert will go to the organization’s scholarship fund to help pay for therapy and rehabilitation for people […]]]>

Nashville-based singer-songwriter Steve Poltz will return to San Diego on Thursday, Nov. 10 for a concert at Belly Up in Solana Beach to benefit the nonprofit Carlsbad Adapt Functional Movement Center.

All proceeds from the concert will go to the organization’s scholarship fund to help pay for therapy and rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis and other chronic neurological conditions.

“I’ve spoken with some of the wonderful people at Adapt, and I know they do a great job serving their community,” said Poltz, who co-wrote Jewel’s multi-platinum hit “You Were Meant for Me” while they both lived in San Diego. . “There are many people who cannot afford treatment. They run the gamut from mental health to physiotherapy.

Poltz, who had his own fear of health in 2015, when he had a mild stroke while performing, said he wanted to help raise money and awareness for people with MS, ALS, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury and cerebral palsy.

“San Diego is like coming home to me,” he said. “That’s where I started The Rugburns, and that’s where I met Jewel. I have a friend who is currently navigating her journey with MS. Adapt is a great organization and I’m honored to team up with them.

Local artist Ryan Hiller is the opening act for the concert, which marks Adapt’s fifth anniversary.

“We’re incredibly thrilled to be back in person putting out great music for an even better cause,” said Adapt co-founder and executive director John Monteith, who was featured in a 2019 History of San Diego Union-Tribune.

“It’s by filling the gap in ongoing rehabilitative care for people with some of the most challenging conditions on the planet that we thrive,” he said. “The return of our annual benefit concert allows us to raise funds to reach an even wider population of people who desperately need our services.”

Monteith started Adapt in 2017 with his wife, Melanie, after being diagnosed with MS.

Doors open at 7 p.m., with Hiller on stage at 8 p.m. Tickets are $50 for general admission and are available online at Belly Up website.

]]>
XSET’s Erin Ashley Simon brings esports opportunities to underserved and underrepresented talent https://avvensanchea.com/xsets-erin-ashley-simon-brings-esports-opportunities-to-underserved-and-underrepresented-talent/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/xsets-erin-ashley-simon-brings-esports-opportunities-to-underserved-and-underrepresented-talent/ Erin Ashley Simon, media personality, helps shape the culture of the organization and … [+] facilitate connections and content in and around music, entertainment. Jeong Park The popularity and market value of esports shows no signs of slowing down. As the popularity of the industry continues to gain momentum, the market capitalization continues to rise. […]]]>

The popularity and market value of esports shows no signs of slowing down.

As the popularity of the industry continues to gain momentum, the market capitalization continues to rise. For example, Accenture estimated that the Total value of the gaming industry in 2021 exceeded $300 billion. This statistic is more than the movie and music markets combined, driven by an increase in mobile gaming and an emphasis on social interaction during the pandemic. Yet despite all the positive aspects of esports, it still lacks diversity. A recent report showed that 46% of players are women; however, only 20% are Latinx, 15% are black, and 5% are Asian American. Additionally, 16% are LGBTQIA. Companies like XSET are breaking down barriers and diversifying games.

Erin Ashley Simon, multimedia personality and co-owner of XSET, helps shape the culture of the organization and facilitates connections and content in and around the music, entertainment and games industry. As Director of Culture, she provides more industry-focused opportunities for people from underserved, underrepresented and marginalized communities. The company features some of the best competitive esports teams in the world in titles including Valorant, Rocket League, and Fortnite. He has partnered with big name brands such as Ghost Lifestyle and SCUF Gaming, also working with socially positive causes including Big Brother Big Sister of America.

“If we sign a non-binary player, I’m the one to educate everyone on the proper ways to identify the individual from their pronouns,” says Simon. “I also work on projects that focus on specific communities. We focused a lot on HBCUs. So I run these DNI projects, whether it’s from a charitable, educational or even entertainment point of view. I work with our team to make sure a lot of the projects, initiatives and milestones that we have have a very inclusive aspect to them. »

In high school, Simon started a blog titled Mess box. Initially, she covered music and fashion before moving on to interviewing high school basketball players. The players gave him exclusive insight into where they went to college, which bolstered his opinions in the national media. She landed places at The Wall Street Journal covering sports and Revolt TV. By the age of 25, she had secured senior positions as a producer.

Having played competitive football at a Division I college, she understood the world of athletics and how athletes can use their voice to drive change. With a sports background combined with a producer mindset, Simon knew she wanted to stay in the world of storytelling. In 2018, she was fired. She got involved and decided to become independent. She started covering the game at the intersection of pop culture. One day, his friend needed a co-host for her show and he asked Simon to join him, which catapulted her career.

“As a full-time freelancer, you never knew when the next paycheck was coming,” she expresses. “You always have to figure out what the next thing is. So I had to develop this resilient mindset of ‘Hey, there’s other things I need to do now that I never had to do when I had a nine-to-five and I had this comfort.’ I had to learn to accept the ups and downs of the industry.

While networking, Simon met gaming executives DJ Clinton Sparks, Marco Mereu, Wil Eddins and Greg Selkoe. Together they built XSET. They recently expanded the Erin Ashley Simon Esports Internship Fund at the University of Kentucky, designed for students interested in careers in gaming and esports. The fund has grown to $5,000, with XSET and Simon focusing on growing the fund in the years to come by attracting support from other businesses and influencers.

“This scholarship is special,” exclaims Simon. “It is set up to create an opportunity for students in financial need to gain experience in gaming and sports while undergoing education… I am delighted to develop it. I’m also excited to continue building esports gaming initiatives at the University of Kentucky because when I was a student-athlete there, they helped me so much to further my career in media and m have supported in so many different ways. so i want to go back to uk [University of Kentucky] and giving back to a state in a space that doesn’t really get that much attention when it comes to these opportunities because there’s so much amazing talent in that region.

As Simon continues to evolve in her career, she is focusing on the following key milestones:

  • Design a plan; determine what you want to do and the impact you want to have. This will help you come up with a workable strategy.
  • Be consistent in your actions. You won’t know if something will work or not if you don’t spend time on it. You need to dedicate at least three to six months before you see traction.
  • Don’t be afraid or feel like a failure if something doesn’t work out. Learn from your mistakes and keep moving forward, applying what has worked for you.

“If I wanted to do something, my mother always let me do it,” concludes Simon. “She said, ‘It’s the only way to really find what you’re passionate about is to try; you can’t know unless you try. So you can’t be afraid. Nobody is really great when they start… I’ve always been very competitive. So I always wanted to be really good at whatever I do, and I wasn’t afraid of tripping up trying.

]]>
the harmonium strikes a chord in our spiritual selves [narrative] https://avvensanchea.com/the-harmonium-strikes-a-chord-in-our-spiritual-selves-narrative/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 02:02:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/the-harmonium-strikes-a-chord-in-our-spiritual-selves-narrative/ the harmonium strikes a chord in our spiritual selves [narrative]At the heart of the Sikh temple, or Gurdwara, under a canopy of fragrant marigolds, draped in thick blue velvet and resting on a dais, is a beautifully calligraphic book. Within this book are the 15,575 stanzas of the 6,000 poems that make up the Guru Granth Sahib, the central religious scripture of Sikhism, first […]]]> the harmonium strikes a chord in our spiritual selves [narrative]

At the heart of the Sikh temple, or Gurdwara, under a canopy of fragrant marigolds, draped in thick blue velvet and resting on a dais, is a beautifully calligraphic book. Within this book are the 15,575 stanzas of the 6,000 poems that make up the Guru Granth Sahib, the central religious scripture of Sikhism, first compiled over 400 years ago.

Is it music? What is music? I see music as a collection of honeyed bits of sound sequenced to shape auditory delicacy. The melody, a singing puff of heat, fights a battle that echoes through the air. A halt, the tumult broken by a sudden seismic calm. It’s simple. You can almost taste the rich flavors of harmony on your tongue. It’s ambrosia that I sometimes don’t think we really deserve: an ethereal, spiritual experience. In Gurdwara, I sit among a mass of people gathered in a room to listen to an invisible art form. The majestic euphony of instruments and voices floats high in the air and warms the soul of each individual with the heartbreaking pace of music and the repetition of God’s name. I find it almost impossible not to equate this musical experience with a divine experience.

Sikh tradition revolves around the beliefs, teachings and religious advice in this holy book written by several authors and compiled during the period of the Sikh Gurus, from 1469 to 1708. My Sikh Faith revolves around the Gurmukhi scripture that fills the pages of the Guru Granth Sahib, composing devotional hymns that praise the nature of God and the lifestyle that flourishes from the daily remembrance of God.

I could spend hours contemplating the ineffable mystery of God. For Sikhs, God cannot be represented; God is neither male nor female, but an entity or force of nature that exists in everything and everyone. A Western scientific perspective may be tempted to personify Waheguru, but we must understand that Waheguru is an omniscient and omnipotent source of energy, not a father figure to the deity. The interconnectedness of the universe, the cosmos, and its creation and Nanak’s theory of God’s energy and God’s creation of the universe overlap in a way that grounds my religious study in modern science. I’m fascinated by the idea of ​​yuga, the Sikh word for era, which is a recontextualized concept from Hinduism.

We are currently living in kaliyuga, which is the turbulent and violent period between the Big Bang 14 billion years ago and the end of the universe as we know it, before the next Big Bang event and the start of the next yuga . Karma and reincarnation are woven into all South Asian religions in the context of liberation from the suffering of life and death through meditation. What strikes me about Sikhi is that the guru recognized the concentric circular notion that the cyclic form of karma persists in nature as well as in faith – we can see this pattern repeating itself in the cycles of terrestrial biosphere, the cycles of the planets of the solar system, and the cycles of creation and destruction of the universe. This concept helps me understand the cycles of my mind, my body, and my entire life as part of a larger workings of the universe. If my soul momentarily appears on this Earth in the form of my body, it will inevitably return to the greatest source of all-encompassing energy, Waheguru. No matter what happens in my mortal and tumultuous life, I will always be part of Waheguru. Gurbani states that, “In this dark era of Kalyug, the chanting of Kirtan is king, the Gurmukhs sing it with their focused minds.” Sikh scripture introduces the concept of using music as an instrument of peace in troubled times for human experience.

Music is considered a concept that predates the human race. It is considered a divine practice of worship in many religious traditions. The mathematical structures behind music theory are referenced in the Bible as the fundamental explanation for the harmony of all life. When humans discovered the sacred nature of musical notes, musical intervals, and the mathematics behind musical compilation, music offered ancient scholars a method to quantify the sanctity of the world, planets, and cosmos through invocation spiritual sound. Harmonic Theory facilitated the shift from interpreting spiritual life through the limited intellect of the human mind to scaling spirituality to the entire universe and its interconnectedness. I believe that if music, a mere organization of sound, is a record of cosmic divinity and a vessel of sacred communication, then all human beings must have a “harmonic origin”.

The first shabad, which means sacred song, of the Guru Granth Sahib begins with Mool Mantar, which serves as a common thread that weaves the whole text. In Sanskrit, this root text is defined as sutra. Many South Asian religious scriptures follow this structure seen in Sikh writings – the sutra is followed by commentary pages. And in the case of the Sikh incarnation of the gurus in a book, Mool Mantar is followed by 1,430 pages of poetic elaboration. I memorized those first lines as a small child and always repeat them at bedtime, but I’m still amazed at the complexity of their meaning. Mool Mantar distills the central dogma of Sikhism. There is Ik Onkar, or One Creator. I hear the sound of Ik Onkar resonating in Gurdwara, in homes and in minds around the world. The root of the Sanskrit word “Om”, or the “sacred sound” originally recorded in Hindu Brahmanic texts, is found in the word Onkar, which means Creator. Om, which signifies the unity of all the energies of the universe in a single syllable, is used to describe the all-encompassing nature of the Sikh belief in Waheguru. Om is all in one sound, and Waheguru is supreme reality unseparated from everything and everyone.

Sikh gurus have recognized the power of music to help a Sikh practice naam simran, or daily remembrance of God. Beneath the layers of folk tales, poetic symbolism, and lessons, reading, listening to, or chanting Sikh scriptures is essentially a form of repeating God’s name and finding solace in suffering through that repeating. Non-attachment is a major element of Sikhism as well as older South Asian religious philosophy. Contemporary Sikhi still live and participate in everyday life, but seek freedom from the ups and downs of worldly life by remembering God and keeping God’s grace, or Meher, in mind. When a Sikh is not attached to temporary and insignificant events, he can better keep love and joy in his heart. Guru Nanak, the first Sikh guru, believed in the metaphor of the lotus growing in muddy water. Even though the lotus is surrounded by earth, it keeps its head above water without getting submerged. The lotus keeps the head turned towards the sun, or Waheguru, just as a person should focus on God while remaining afloat and level despite the worldly distractions of attachment. Sikhs who achieve this will flourish in the radiance of God and attain enlightenment. Although attaining enlightenment is not the goal of religion in my life, the practice of meditative thought offers the perspective that I so often miss in the overwhelming chaos of everyday life. Guru reminds me not to berate myself for losing sight of naam simran by lovingly guiding me in the practice of being with a welcoming God whenever I feel lost under the murky waters of anxiety, pride and sadness.

A Sikh comes to the true understanding that to reach God, we must end the tormenting battle of attachment to temporal, mundane and materialistic matters. Singing God’s praises reminds us that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted from one form of energy to another. Sikhism sees God on a fundamental, particulate physical level. Ajooni, a core concept of Mool Mantar, states that Ik Onkaar does not condense and enter any birth. All phenomena of birth and death form within Waheguru. Release from the tumultuous cycle of energy being recycled into organic matter through the variations of life and death can be achieved by remembering that we are all already part of Waheguru. The cycle is only an illusion of mortal triviality.

Lakh Khushian Patashahian, the shabad which plays as a musical blessing to Gurdwara during wedding ceremonies, reminds newlyweds that “hundreds of thousands of princely pleasures are enjoyed, if the True Guru bestows His Gaze of Grace”. Music helps me feel God and be with the physical vibrations felt when I chant God’s name. The experience of invoking Waheguru into our physical bodies and vocal cords to create beautiful art as a community celebrates our interconnected lives, origins, and futures in the cosmos and beyond. Poetry set to music can paint the indescribable beauty of Waheguru in a way that words fail to capture.

]]>
Witnesses describe ‘hell’ in South Korean crowd https://avvensanchea.com/witnesses-describe-hell-in-south-korean-crowd/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 02:18:32 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/witnesses-describe-hell-in-south-korean-crowd/ SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — In an instant, thousands of Halloween revelers packed the narrow, bustling streets of Seoul’s most cosmopolitan district, eager to show off their capes, wizard hats and wings. of bat. In the next, a wave of panic spread as an unmanageable mass of people got stuck in a narrow alley in […]]]>

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — In an instant, thousands of Halloween revelers packed the narrow, bustling streets of Seoul’s most cosmopolitan district, eager to show off their capes, wizard hats and wings. of bat.

In the next, a wave of panic spread as an unmanageable mass of people got stuck in a narrow alley in Itaewon. Overthrown revelers were trapped for 40 minutes, piled on top of each other “like dominoes” in a chaotic crush so intense that clothes were ripped off.

A stunned Seoul was just beginning Monday to muster the huge reach of the crowd surge the Saturday night that killed at least 153, mostly people in their 20s and 30s, including foreign nationals. The Interior and Security Ministry said it expected more deaths as there were more than 130 injured, many in serious condition.

Witnesses described a nightmarish scene as people performed CPR on the dying and carried limp bodies to ambulances, while dance music pulsated from screaming clubs lit by bright neon lights. Others tried desperately to pull out those trapped at the bottom of the crowd of people, but often failed because there were too many dead on them.

“We were so tightly packed that we couldn’t even move to call and report the situation,” said one survivor, surnamed Lee. “We were strangers, but we held hands and repeatedly shouted, ‘Let’s survive!'”

Kim Mi Sung, who works for a non-profit organization in Itaewon, told The Associated Press that nine out of 10 people she administered CPR eventually died. Many were bleeding from the nose and mouth. Most were women who dressed as witches or wore other Halloween costumes; two were foreigners.

“It was like hell,” Kim said. “I still can’t believe what happened.”

In this ultra-connected, high-tech country, the anguish, terror and grief – along with many details of what happened – are most vividly manifested on social media. Users posted messages desperate for friends and relatives, as witnesses and survivors described what they had been through.

“I thought I was dying,” one woman said in posts on Twitter. “My whole body was stuck among everyone, as people laughed from a terrace and filmed us. I thought I was really going to die if I screamed. I reached out my hands to (the others) who were at the above me and I managed to get out.

An unidentified woman in her twenties cried as she described the scene to Yonhap News Agency: “It looked like people’s graves piled on top of each other. Some of them were slowly losing consciousness and others already seemed dead.

A man, surnamed Kong, said he managed to escape to a nearby bar with his friends after the crash. He saw through the windows of the bar that people were falling on top of each other “like dominoes”, Yonhap reported.

When a 27-year-old office worker who gave only his last name, Choi, left the bar he was in during the crush, he saw dozens of police and paramedics. “It looked like a war zone,” he said.

The bodies of 10 to 15 people were lined up in front of the King Kebab restaurant on the asphalt and were covered with blue tarpaulins as he passed.

“It looked like they were asleep – eyes closed, mouths open. They looked like mannequins,” Choi said.

Friends and family gathered at a local government office to try to find any news of the missing.

A Twitter user posted a series of messages asking for information about a 17-year-old friend who had went to Itaewon to celebrate by wearing a headband that looked like cat ears.

“I lost contact with her. She has been a friend of mine for 12 years and we were like family. Please help me,” the message read.

Even after the crash, witnesses said they saw revelers not immediately make way for emergency vehicles, rescuers and police. A viral video clip on Twitter showing a crowd of young people dancing and chanting near the carnage drew several insults from South Koreans.

Ken Fallas, a Costa Rican architect who has worked in Seoul for eight years, was stunned to watch a dozen or more oblivious revelers being transported from a narrow alleyway filled with youngsters dressed as movie characters.

Fallas said police and rescuers pleaded with people to intervene if they knew how to perform CPR, as they were overwhelmed by the large number of injured people.

“I saw a lot of (young) people laughing, but I don’t think they were (really) laughing because, you know, what’s funny? said Fallas. “They were laughing because they were too scared. Because being in front of such a thing is not easy. Not everyone knows how to deal with this.

___

AP reporters Juwon Park in Seoul, South Korea, and Jee-won Jeong and Kiko Rosario in Bangkok contributed to this story.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

]]>
Wynton Marsalis and Vincent Gardner love Houston’s jazz heritage and want to help it grow https://avvensanchea.com/wynton-marsalis-and-vincent-gardner-love-houstons-jazz-heritage-and-want-to-help-it-grow/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 15:33:45 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/wynton-marsalis-and-vincent-gardner-love-houstons-jazz-heritage-and-want-to-help-it-grow/ Jazz at the Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis. Photo: photo provided Arguments these days about what constitutes jazz seem almost quaint. Contemporary artists – many of them Houstonians such as Robert Glasper, James Francies and Chris Dave – have approached creative expression with a blank slate. They can and will use all the tools […]]]>

Jazz at the Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis.

Photo: photo provided

Arguments these days about what constitutes jazz seem almost quaint. Contemporary artists – many of them Houstonians such as Robert Glasper, James Francies and Chris Dave – have approached creative expression with a blank slate. They can and will use all the tools and sounds necessary to deliver the music they deem vital and contemporary.

Although Wynton Marsalis is only 61 years old, his arrival as a teenage phenom decades ago allowed him to shed his skin to become a veteran jazz statesman early on. And he suggests that all the old hype in jazz – the debate between innovation and traditionalism – was unnecessary.

It’s the proposition of our Constitution,” says Marsalis, who brings his Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra to the Wortham Theater Center this week as it rocks in Southeast Texas. “You don’t want to rewrite the Constitution. Why would you do that? You had nine, 10 geniuses around him. I don’t think you push the music forward and do something different. East Schoenberg ahead of Beethoven? I never heard that. It doesn’t look like that. First of all, I don’t think any of them are ahead of Palestrina. They do different things. But you can play Palestrina music and think, ‘Man, what the hell is this?!'”

He believes there is no need to destroy and rebuild. Rather, music should exist independent of time and place.

Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra

When: 7:30 p.m. November 3

Where: Wortham Theater Center, 501 Texas

Details: $53 to $103; 832-487-7041; jazzhouston.org

He cites his father, pianist Ellis Marsalis, as encouraging him to learn the history of music and find his way of expression there. This experience happened in parallel for Vincent Gardner, trombonist of Marsalis’ Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and co-founder of Jazz Houston. Gardner also learned from his father, a jazz musician. “We had our own way of playing, and they encouraged us to be,” Marsalis explains. “Why then should we destroy our art form? Especially to imitate popular forms, what for? What do we have to give? he asks. “That’s what I’m looking at.

Marsalis in a repeatedly postponed Zoom call over story questions to Gardner. The trumpet player and composer heard Gardner in Florida decades ago and knew he wanted the trombonist in his band. This Gardner is a high-end, value-added arranger, as is his ability to sing. Marsalis also relies on him for other matters.

“He’s the real historian,” says Marsalis. “If I have a question, I call him and ask him.”

After a stopover in Galveston, Marsalis will be in Houston for a series of Jazz Houston events, including a performance for students at the Central Houston Public Library’s Barbara Bush Plaza, as well as visits to the Houston and Klein school districts for master classes. and workshops. He does this because Gardner and his wife, singer Belinda Munro, saw an opportunity in Houston — a city with a rich jazz history that remains alive despite the city’s formidable attrition of musicians to New York or Los Angeles. Gardner and Munro uprooted their lives in New York to reseed jazz in Houston through Jazz Houston, an organization that produces concerts, conducts a local jazz band, and also runs educational endeavors, including a youth orchestra.

A few weeks ago they produced a musical program celebrating Arnett Cobb, Illinois Jacquet and other Houston jazz legends.

“We try to celebrate the past, the present and the future,” says Gardner. “All centered around the city of Houston.”

Sow jazz in the city H

The creation of Jazz at Lincoln Center by Marsalis was crucial in a codification of jazz as a form of American music worthy of being treated in a concert hall. His goal was not to take him out of the clubs where the music was born more than a century ago, nor from the tight spaces where it began to flourish. He simply wanted to give jazz an institutionalized reverence comparable to classical music. He sought to canonize an American art form.

Jazz at Lincoln Center is flourishing in New York. Gardner and Munro saw opportunities beyond a city with an integrated jazz infrastructure, including legacy clubs and smaller spaces for more experimental fare.

“We’re just supporting his idea,” Marsalis says. “His baby.”

Gardner noted the migration patterns of Houston musicians from Wheatley High School, Kashmere High School and also the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. Houston had a royal history of legendary jazz artists who stayed here – as performers or educators: Conrad Johnson, Cobb, Don Wilkerson.

“New York is the mecca of music, where you get the most direct and meaningful instruction,” says Gardner. “And the most opportunity.”

But he was intrigued by “all the mean cats that have come from Houston over the years.”

He spent time digging into the rudiments of the Texas tenor sound, the way saxophonists made prominent use of the low register in contrast to what others were playing in the ensemble. “I have a deep understanding and deep appreciation for that now,” Gardner says. “A lot of great stuff came from musicians in Houston being merged into the bigger jazz pool. I look forward to discovering more and bringing them to light, so that people can see what this great city has brought to the tradition of jazz.

And he also wants to maintain this tradition among young players.

“Why can’t we create an environment where this kind of local talent has an opportunity in the city it comes from?”

Granted, Gardner and Munro’s timing likely caused them to question their idea. They arrived before after Hurricane Harvey scoured the Gulf Coast and inundated Houston.

Education and history

Like Marsalis, Gardner is a next-generation jazz performer. They both believe that education is just as crucial as acting. “You have to have this educational wing,” Gardner says. “To reach young people and encourage them to continue. And focus on those who come to listen to what you do.

That’s what he and Munro did here. Their line-up is remarkable, with thematic concerts that celebrate the history of jazz. Their work also digs deep into the ground: Last month, Munro sang works associated with Anita Moore, an understated Houston native who sang with Duke Ellington.

Moore died in 2001 with not enough attention for her glittering career. This September Jazz Houston show also included pianist Helen Sung, an HSPVA alumnus, and a performance by the Jazz Houston Youth Orchestra.

Like Marsalis, Gardner and Munro firmly believe that jazz can honor history without becoming a museum piece.

“I think young people of this generation are very familiar with self-identity,” he says. “And there is no better music in the world to affirm your identity than jazz music. They recognize that in the music. And I think that’s why they like to play it.

“Let the music be what it is”

“Pick who you want to pick in art history,” Marsalis says. “They have been educated. Bach was taught. With the possible exception of Berlioz. Maybe.”

Marsalis appoints a local professor, Bob Morgan, who for years was in charge of jazz studies at the HSPVA. In fact, Marsalis drops dozens of names during a conversation. The effect is not to arouse admiration in front of his acquaintances or his list of contacts, but rather to try to silence the notion of jazz as “another” form of art. Classical composers, iconoclasts like Willie Nelson, educators like Morgan: they are referenced to iron out discussions that create a sense of otherness, which can often be casually applied when it comes to race and class.

“Black and white are constructs that are not real,” he says. “When you start living in unreal constructs, you have to start inventing more and more things to make them real. The prejudices are real. But someone says ‘the Hispanic vote’… What is it is? Ecuador? Cuba? A certain class of Mexico?”

He says his mentor – legendary writer Albert Murray – asked, “How can you be a minority in your own country? Can a Frenchman be a minority in France? The terminology we use ‘jazz as a pure form’…jazz is a hybrid. There is no pure form.

Gardner says, “There’s a lot of things we look into, but I believe in letting the music be what it is. That will define what it is.

And Marsalis adds: “We need another mythology.

Thus Marsalis, at 61, and Gardner, ten years younger, contribute to codifying a new mythology. Gardner cites Marsalis as crucial in helping him structure Jazz Houston: things involving a board of directors, finances, management.

They will both take the stage for a performance as part of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.

The name of Marsalis figures prominently there. But he sees their workload as shared.

“They don’t need me, Vincent is here to do his thing,” he said. “The trick is to get away from the cult of personality. I think it’s all of us. Vince is our musical director for this time.

“We are part of a continuum. And I love that continuum. …Vincent has the tradition and an investment in the community that will bear fruit. We are lucky to have a representative of this quality who will see a forest grow around him.

andrew.dansby@houstonchronicle.com





  • Andrew Dansby

    Andrew Dansby covers culture and entertainment, both local and national, for the Houston Chronicle. He came to The Chronicle in 2004 from Rolling Stone, where he spent five years writing about music. He had previously spent five years in book publishing, working with publisher George RR Martin on the first two books in the series that would become “Game of Thrones” on television. photos you’ve never seen. He has written for Rolling Stone, American Songwriter, Texas Music, Playboy and other publications.

    Andrew dislikes monkeys, dolphins, and the outdoors.

]]>
Hindu YUVA Celebrates Diwali with Musical “Ramleela” https://avvensanchea.com/hindu-yuva-celebrates-diwali-with-musical-ramleela/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 09:36:27 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/hindu-yuva-celebrates-diwali-with-musical-ramleela/ Angeli Mittal / Daily Senior Contributor “Wildcat Diwali Ramleela: The Ram Story” ran Sunday night to kick off Northwestern’s Diwali festivities. The holiday marks the return of Ram – one of Hinduism’s most revered deities – to his hometown of Ayodhya after defeating the demon king, Ravana. The Hindu holiday Diwali celebrates a number of […]]]>

Angeli Mittal / Daily Senior Contributor

“Wildcat Diwali Ramleela: The Ram Story” ran Sunday night to kick off Northwestern’s Diwali festivities. The holiday marks the return of Ram – one of Hinduism’s most revered deities – to his hometown of Ayodhya after defeating the demon king, Ravana.

The Hindu holiday Diwali celebrates a number of values, according to Aastha Patel, first-year Hindu YUVA representative and McCormick rookie. — the triumph of good over evil, the extinction of negativity and the transition to a new year.

Although Diwali is widely celebrated across South Asia, students on campus are not always able to fully commemorate the traditions of the holiday as they can at home, Patel said.

This gap in cultural experience has partly inspired Hindu YUVA, a Hindu cultural youth groupto host “Wildcat Diwali Ramleela: The Story of Ram”, a musical version of the Hindu epic Ramayana, at Cahn Auditorium on Sunday.

The club commissioned Mandala South Asian Performing Arts, a Chicago-based organization, to present its production of the tale. The event also marked Northwestern’s second official Diwali celebration, following a ceremony and musical performances. Last year.

“We really wanted there to be a place where you can go to get an authentic sense of what Diwali is and feel like you’re at home,” Patel said.

Diwali marks the celebration of Ram – one of Hinduism’s most revered deities – returning to his village of Ayodhya after his great battle against the wicked king of Lanka, Ravana.

According to the epic, Ram, along with his wife Sita and brother Lakshman, is exiled to the forest by his father to repay a debt to Ram’s mother-in-law, Kaikeyi. Ravana kidnaps Sita in the forest out of lust, which forces Ram to rescue her from the Demon King’s palace and defeat him.

McCormick senior and YUVA Hindu co-chairman Sparsh Gautam said Diwali celebrations are linked to light in several ways, with the holiday often referred to as the festival of lights.

“Diwali day actually falls on a new moon day,” he said. “In order for (Ram) to find his way, many villages and kingdoms… had fully enlightened him so that he knew how to return to his kingdom.”

To honor the celebration of lights, third-year McCormick graduate student and event volunteer Mythreyi Ramesh said she helped decorate the auditorium with colorful garlands and diyas, or small oil lamps. . The group also posted posters in the hall to teach attendees about the history of Diwali and the Ramayana.

Mandala performed the tale through instrumental music and without dialogue, so that all audience members could follow the plot, regardless of their prior understanding of the Hindu epic.

Gautam said Hindu YUVA partnered with Mandala for several reasons, but the performing arts company’s instrumental storytelling approach stood out from the club.

“We don’t just want to limit this to Hindu students celebrating the culture, but also provide a platform and an opportunity for others to be educated and aware of the importance of Diwali,” Gautam said.

Before the musical Hindu Chaplain Amar Shah (Weinberg ’16), University Chaplain Reverend Kristen Glass Perez and Professor McCormick Sanjay Mehrotra introduced the celebration to the audience. They discussed the importance of the holiday and practiced traditions like lighting the first diya and reciting a sacred mantra.

Ramesh said the Diwali performance motivated her to become more actively involved in the Hindu YUVA. The event created a sense of camaraderie and belonging across the campus community that she hopes to see more of at NU, Ramesh added.

“I just hope…everyone will get a taste of what it feels like to be in a festival environment that is Diwali,” Ramesh said, “and also learn more about the culture and stories that have shaped the childhood and even the adulthood of many people.”

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @charlottehrlich

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @rjleung7

Related stories:

Hindu YUVA at Northwestern builds community around shared values

Captured: SASA spotlights student performance groups with Festival of Lights

Northwestern Hosts First Institution-Supported Diwali Celebration

]]>