Neighborhood Association – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 10:21:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://avvensanchea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6.png Neighborhood Association – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ 32 32 Abandoned Tampa neighborhood chickens find refuge https://avvensanchea.com/abandoned-tampa-neighborhood-chickens-find-refuge/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 08:12:22 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/abandoned-tampa-neighborhood-chickens-find-refuge/ TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — It started as a playful Instagram page dedicated to Ybor City’s free-range chicken flocks. Dylan Breese, the founder of the Ybor Chickens Society Instagram page, gave the birds names that matched their personalities. He shared details of their days. Six years later, Breese’s business has grown far beyond taking photos. “I’m […]]]>

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — It started as a playful Instagram page dedicated to Ybor City’s free-range chicken flocks.

Dylan Breese, the founder of the Ybor Chickens Society Instagram page, gave the birds names that matched their personalities. He shared details of their days.

Six years later, Breese’s business has grown far beyond taking photos.

“I’m definitely waking up and wondering how it got to this point,” Breese said with a laugh.

Since December, he has leased a 6,000 square foot lot at the corner of 17th Street and Columbus Drive. There he built four chicken coops and a shed which is used as a medical facility.

Called Ybor Misfits Microsanctuary and supported as a non-profit organization, it is where Breese cares for injured and sick Ybor wild chickens and welcomes and rehouses abandoned domesticated hens in the Latin District.

The effort has support from the mayor’s office, a city council member, a state senator, and the city’s last operating cigar factory.

Technically, the Microsanctuary is going against a city ordinance that prohibits trapping and removing chickens. But the city will allow it as long as the inhabitants are not hungry.

“The City of Tampa supports happy, healthy chickens,” Adam Smith, spokesperson for Mayor Jane Castor, emailed. “We appreciate all animal lovers.”

Tampa City Council President Orlando Gudes, whose district includes Ybor, said Breese is doing something good for the community. “If someone comes to me and complains, we’ll find out what needs to be done so they can help the chickens, but not violate the code,” Gudes said.

CHICKEN HISTORY

Chickens have been a part of Ybor since it was founded by immigrants from Cuba, Spain and Italy in the late 1800s. Some were part of small farms. Others were in the backyards.

The birds remained in the 1970s, when Ybor was populated with council housing with residents raising chickens for food.

The free-range herd increased in the 1980s.

It was then that longtime Ybor resident Tommy Stephens was given two hens and a rooster. A neighbor already had five hens, all free range. The population grew naturally, Stephens told the Tampa Bay Times.

Around the same time, former Ybor resident and business owner Cephas Gilbert once said he had a co-op that was destroyed by a storm. His 40 chickens escaped and he chose to allow them to roam free and multiply.

In 1989, some saw chickens as a nuisance and wanted to get rid of them.

The Tampa City Council responded with an ordinance proclaiming Ybor a bird sanctuary, which prohibits trapping and removal of birds.

Breese said what he was doing wasn’t really entrapment.

“It’s an inhumane way to think about it,” he said. “They are part of this community and a symbol of the city. We cannot let them suffer.

Especially the abandoned ones, he says. They are domesticated and have difficulty finding food. And wild birds will violently expel strangers from a flock.

Ybor’s chicken population increased five years ago due to urban farmers abandoning their unwanted chickens there.

Some residents and businesses in the district have complained about chickens pooping on porches, destroying mulch and procreating publicly.

That’s when Breese’s company, which he says has had dozens of volunteers over the years, grew from an Instagram page to a group seeking to bring harmony between chickens and haters by cleaning up damage and keeping birds away from public events.

Yet these efforts were not enough for everyone. Some wanted to hire trappers to reduce the population.

In response, the city considered changing the bird sanctuary ordinance in a way that reflects Breese’s effort. The city has suggested trapping and rehoming abandoned chickens and sick and injured ferals.

The hawks served as population control before the city acted and the amendment was dropped.

Breese, who gained certification in chicken welfare and behavior through an online course from the University of Edinburgh, founded his sanctuary in early 2020, using the backyard first from his home in Ybor as his head office.

He has rules. The chickens must be in Ybor to begin with.

“Please don’t call me about one on Bearss Avenue or somewhere like that,” Breese said.

The sanctuary only welcomes wild chickens that are so badly injured or sick that they need time away from the flock and the natural elements to recover.

He sends the birds to the vets if necessary. And he tries to cut their stay short.

“If they’re out for too long, they lose their place in the pecking order,” Breese said. “The flock will then reject him and push him away. If we take him out for more than a week or two, he becomes an underdog and a fight may result.

He finds homes for chickens when they need too much time to rehabilitate.

And he tries to rehouse all the abandoned chickens.

“They’re easy to identify,” Breese said.

For starters, he knows all the wild chickens in Ybor.

Plus, “the abandoned ones are bigger,” he said. “They’re a special type of breed used for meat, so they’ve been given growth hormones.”

It is unknown how many chickens roam Ybor.

Over the years, the total varied from 30 to 200. It depended on the season, the activity of the falcons and the number of dropouts.

Breese estimates that he treats 25 to 50 people a year and relocates 15 to 25.

It was too much to do from her backyard, so Breese began looking for a property to dedicate solely to the sanctuary.

Ivan Rivera, a real estate agent and president of the VM Ybor Neighborhood Association, connected Breese with the JC Newman Cigar Co., which had an empty lot across from their factory.

“We admire and are grateful for the work that Dylan and his non-profit rescue organization are doing for the historic herd at large in Ybor City,” said Drew Newman, general counsel for the family business.

The family lets the nonprofit use the land for $100 a month, Newman said, and donated $4,000 toward the purchase of the medical facility shed.

The company also designed Ybor Misfits Microsanctuary shirts, mugs, and posters for sale at the factory’s gift shop. All profits support the nonprofit.

Another benefit, Breese said, is the Newmans’ plan to move thousands of bats from a nearby building to bat houses that will be set up nearby. Bats eat mosquitoes, which can transmit disease from chicken to chicken.

Still, Breese is aware that he is playing chicken with the town ordinance. He proactively spoke with the city council, the mayor’s office, and state senator Janet Cruz, who wrote to the city in support of Microsanctuary.

“They are working to serve a public good by preserving the culture and history of historic Ybor City in Tampa,” the letter read.

There’s still work to be done, Breese said.

He wants to add accommodations for visitors, like picnic tables, and allow school trips and tour groups to visit.

“Chickens have always been a part of Ybor,” Breese said. “They are part of his culture. We must protect them. »

]]>
What Liz Cheney can teach American evangelicals https://avvensanchea.com/what-liz-cheney-can-teach-american-evangelicals/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 17:45:59 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/what-liz-cheney-can-teach-american-evangelicals/ This piece was adapted from Russell Moore newsletter. Subscribe here. Some people in her own party want Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) to lose her committee membership and even her spot on her party’s conference in the U.S. House of Representatives, all because she won’t “walk away” from her. the beliefs that attempts to overturn the […]]]>

This piece was adapted from Russell Moore newsletter. Subscribe here.

Some people in her own party want Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) to lose her committee membership and even her spot on her party’s conference in the U.S. House of Representatives, all because she won’t “walk away” from her. the beliefs that attempts to overturn the last election – leading to last January’s attack on the Capitol – are a clear and present danger to democracy.

Whatever you think of Cheney (as you can imagine, I’m a fan), there’s a broader point here, which applies to many evangelical Christians in a thousand different situations in their churches and communities: to what moment will you cease to retain your influence? ?

I thought about this riddle last week while reading the transcripts of a New York Times podcast debate between Charlie Sykes of the rampart and Rich Lowry of National exam, both Conservatives who admire the integrity and conviction of MP Cheney.

Where they disagree is on whether Cheney has wasted his influence within his party in a way that will prevent him from addressing these issues in the future.

“As a politician, you need to know where your constituents are,” Lowry said. “It doesn’t mean you pander to them or play with their worst instincts or always say yes to whatever they want. But to live is to maneuver. Especially if you’re a politician. Lowry said that Cheney’s refusal to back down on these issues wouldn’t help.After all, if you’re not at the table, you can’t have any influence.

Sykes Noted that this idea is a common rationalization and that it is circular. People who want others to shut up or accept some kind of craziness often “tell themselves they have to stay in the room so they can sound the alarm, but they refuse to sound the alarm so they can stay in the room. ”

When I read this I immediately thought of how often I have sat in the surreal situation of a televised debate where the person I was debating shrugged sadly and agreed with me off camera , but started saying the opposite again as soon as the lights and cameras came back on.

I can think of people I have known in Christian ministry who have told me, behind closed doors, how disgusted they were by a politician whom they considered immoral but who then, in public, praised the same politician as a man of integrity. The same is true across government.

The argument is that we need adults in the room. As leadership expert John Maxwell once put, “Being one step ahead makes you a leader. … Being fifty steps ahead could make you a martyr. government – often tell themselves that they have to play around with things they think are nonsense to maintain their long-term ability to prevent bad things from happening “If I’m not there, someone worse will be they reason.

There is a kernel of truth in that, of course. I facepalm every time I hear of a young pastor, after arriving at a church, removing the American flag from the shrine, or trying to excommunicate everyone who hasn’t been there for a year. “Even if you’re right, those aren’t your biggest problems right now,” I would tell that person. “And now is not the right time to face them.”

Daniel in Babylon was ready to go into the lion’s den demanding that he worship the king, but when it came to eating the rich delights of the king’s table, he cautiously offered alternatives instead. Jesus didn’t believe he owed the temple tax, but he paid it “that we should cause no offense” (Matthew 17:27). The apostle Paul circumcised Timothy so that the young man’s Gentile heritage would not be a stumbling block for the mission (Acts 16:3).

The problem is that there comes a time when you go from “choosing battles” to a scorched conscience. Peter’s refusal to eat with the Gentiles was, Paul writes, “not to act according to the truth of the gospel” (Gal. 2:14). Almost every time someone acts out of fear of being kicked out of what CS Lewis has called the “inner ring”, the person explains that it is simply a matter of “working within the system” or “living for fight another day”.

Whatever you think of Liz Cheney (did I mention I’m a fan?), no one can seriously suggest that she was an inattentive radical revolutionary. She has twice backed the president she now criticizes and voted with him more than 95% of the time. She had the esteem of her colleagues to such an extent that she was elected third in the hierarchy of her party’s House. She is an adult. She was in all the rooms.

There was a line, however, she couldn’t cross – when she was asked to support things she believed to be against her oath to the Constitution. What was she supposed to expect? If attacking the Capitol to stop the counting of electoral votes isn’t the time for her to speak out, when exactly is that time?

Martin Luther King Jr., in his famous “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” was responding to a group of “moderate white” ministers who had criticized his nonviolent action in the city as doing more harm than good in pressing progress so quickly that it caused backlash.

Sociologist Peter Berger explained in the same period how this happens. He showed that a key predictor of whether a pastor would speak out about Jim Crow injustice was whether that church was in a building program or major church growth campaign.

And, contrary to the idea of ​​biding his time and building his influence to do the right thing later, Berger found that the longer a pastor served in his church, the more less probably the pastor had to challenge Jim Crow.

As we go up, we say to ourselves: “I don’t have the platform to speak yet; when I have one, I will. Once we got to where we were going, we said to ourselves, “I have too much to lose; if I am not at the table, they will lose my voice. We think it’s the voice of caution within us, but perhaps more often than not it’s just ambition mixed with fear.

Not only are internal rationalizations circular, but so are external circumstances. Whether in a church, a ministry, a workplace, a town hall or a neighborhood association, we say to ourselves: “I will live with this little delirium so that I am there to stop the big delirium”.

Yet, while these crazy things are happening, someone watching it all wonders, “Am I the only one who sees this crazy?” When everyone acts like the crazy situation is normal, this observer shrugs and concludes, “It must be me.”

And then madness becomes the new norm. And people “retain their influence” for when it’s needed, for anything that’s just a little crazier. I’ve been there, and this path does not lead to anything good.

Sooner or later, its influence is not retained but hoarded. Sooner or later, one does not act out of cautious patience, but out of a burnt conscience.

Stop relying on the adults in the room to solve problems. Stop imagining that the crises erupting around us will subside on their own.

Sometimes the adult in the room is the only one who can signal that the room is on fire.

Russell Moore directs the Public Theology Project at Christianity Today.

]]>
Sedalia Police and Pettis County Deputies are assisting in the pursuit of the vehicle https://avvensanchea.com/sedalia-police-and-pettis-county-deputies-are-assisting-in-the-pursuit-of-the-vehicle/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 18:05:49 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/sedalia-police-and-pettis-county-deputies-are-assisting-in-the-pursuit-of-the-vehicle/ This article is compiled from reports published by the Pettis County Sheriff’s Office. On the evening of January 16, the Sedalia Police Department attempted to conduct a traffic stop in the area of ​​West 16th Street and South Kentucky Avenue for a vehicle that failed to stop at a stop sign. The driver of the […]]]>

This article is compiled from reports published by the Pettis County Sheriff’s Office.

On the evening of January 16, the Sedalia Police Department attempted to conduct a traffic stop in the area of ​​West 16th Street and South Kentucky Avenue for a vehicle that failed to stop at a stop sign. The driver of the vehicle did not stop and the SPD initiated a pursuit of the vehicle. As the driver, later identified as Travis Martin, 32, of Sedalia, continued through the county, the SPD called off the pursuit.

Moments later, the Pettis County K9 Unit observed the same vehicle drive through a stop sign in the area of ​​South Park Avenue and Forest Park Road. The vehicle did not have a Missouri license plate attached to the vehicle. Deputies launched a vehicle chase north on South Grand Avenue towards the city limits. Deputies requested mutual aid from the Sedalia Police Department, and Sedalia officers were able to deploy stop sticks at 35th Street and South Park Avenue.

Pettis County Deputies, Sedalia Police Department and the Pettis County K9 Unit conducted a felony arraignment. Travis Martin exited the vehicle and was taken into custody. Deputies and officers then gave orders to the passenger, identified as Jasmine C. Walker, 22, of Sedalia. Walker was found in possession of a crystalline substance as she entered the Pettis County Jail. When deputies spoke with Walker, she told deputies of a gun that was thrown from the vehicle during the incident.

Knowing this information, the Pettis County K9 unit, along with the Sedalia Police K9 unit, began searching the area for the firearm. Sedalia K9 Charlie then located the firearm which was allegedly thrown from the vehicle. The two K9s were used to search the large area for the weapon, as well as illegal substances that may have been thrown from the vehicle.

The Pettis County Sheriff’s Office charges the following fees:

Travis Martin – felony of resisting arrest, possession of a controlled substance, unlawful use of a weapon, theft and tampering with physical evidence.

Jasmine Walker – Possession of a controlled substance.

The Pettis County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the Sedalia Police Department and K9 Charlie for their assistance.


KEEP READING: Here are the best places to retire in America

]]>
As one Lake Street business closes, others are ready to go through the ‘reconstruction phase’ https://avvensanchea.com/as-one-lake-street-business-closes-others-are-ready-to-go-through-the-reconstruction-phase/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 01:56:18 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/as-one-lake-street-business-closes-others-are-ready-to-go-through-the-reconstruction-phase/ Niver opened the Italian restaurant in 2019 unaware that the pandemic, unrest and a spike in crime would shut it down. “We couldn’t bear the financial part of it all anymore. It’s just that there aren’t as many people here as before,” Niver said. The owner explained that he has seen businesses come and go […]]]>

Niver opened the Italian restaurant in 2019 unaware that the pandemic, unrest and a spike in crime would shut it down.

“We couldn’t bear the financial part of it all anymore. It’s just that there aren’t as many people here as before,” Niver said.

The owner explained that he has seen businesses come and go in the Lyn-Lake neighborhood. Some companies said they were maintaining their optimism and sticking around.

“We are in a solid reconstruction phase. I feel like it’s starting to come back as people start to trust the neighborhood again,” said Mikael Carlson, director of Wuollet Bakery & Coffee.

Carlson said he’s seen a change in the neighborhood — more people are moving out than moving in.

He thanks regular customers for keeping the lights on.

“This neighborhood is really loyal to the neighborhood. Very nice townsman. It’s really good,” Carlson said.

Lyn-Lake Business Association board members explained that there are a lot of moving parts that make it difficult to run a small business in unpredictable times.

“You look at the cumulative effect of everything that’s happened and then you add winter on top, there’s definitely less foot traffic. The more people have a specific destination in mind and they go there” , said Morgan Luzier, board member of the Lyn-Lake Business Association.

But challenges don’t scare people away.

Over the next few months, Luzier said, at least two new businesses will open in the neighborhood.

“There’s always someone crazy enough to open a small business because we’re passionate, independent people. It’s hard to hold us back despite all of this,” Luzier said.

The owner of the Third Space Café did not hesitate to open her café in Lyn-Lake.

“I know the neighborhood has changed, and I know Minneapolis itself is going through a transitional phase, but we don’t see or feel the narrative that’s being portrayed about this neighborhood,” said the owner of Third Space Café, Erin Ryan-Mosley. “I am here every day. I see the neighborhood. I eat it, sleep it and breathe it and it comes back.

Business owners agree – despite the ups and downs, Lyn-Lake’s future is still bright.

“There are definitely still plenty of opportunities here and Lake Street will always come back strong. It just takes a little time,” Niver said.

The last day to dine at Mucci in Minneapolis is Saturday.

Mucci’s original location in St. Paul will continue to serve customers, according to the owner.

]]>
Emerson Community Association in Howard County Wins National Competition for Associa’s 2021 Green Community Award https://avvensanchea.com/emerson-community-association-in-howard-county-wins-national-competition-for-associas-2021-green-community-award/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 04:37:21 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/emerson-community-association-in-howard-county-wins-national-competition-for-associas-2021-green-community-award/ Sterling Park Little Free Library Enchanted Reading Pollinator Garden, one of four gardens set up in Emerson’s Parks, with plant identification signs, some with community-shared herb boxes. Announced by press release on January 13: Emerson Community Association announced that it had won a national competition for communities of communities, condominiums and homeowners associations managed by […]]]>
Sterling Park Little Free Library Enchanted Reading Pollinator Garden, one of four gardens set up in Emerson’s Parks, with plant identification signs, some with community-shared herb boxes.

Announced by press release on January 13:

Emerson Community Association announced that it had won a national competition for communities of communities, condominiums and homeowners associations managed by Associa, the largest community management company in North America.

The ASSOCIA GREEN AWARD is given to Emerson in recognition of his achievements in organizing environmentally responsible community events and promoting a green lifestyle in the Emerson community through seven categories: green building , energy efficiency, efficient water use, trees and green spaces, recycling and waste reduction. , education and innovation.

The Emerson Community Association has taken many steps to fulfill its vision of environmental and wildlife stewardship in a way that protects and enhances Emerson’s desirability and property values; transitioning to non-invasive native plants for landscaping; installing Little Free Library Enchanted Reading Pollinator Gardens in four parks with plant identification signage, investing in forest restoration, and improving 17 stormwater management ponds; storm sewer stencil reminding of our relationship with the watershed; and working with schools and local residents to develop green excursions to preservation areas, among other efforts. JEAN SILVER-ISENSTADT, program manager for Emerson’s Environment and Habitat Stewardship Initiative, said, “Emerson is taking a deeper approach to caring for the land we manage, where beauty is more than superficial, but reflects the health of the whole.”

RICHARD FLINN, Chairman of the Emerson Community Association Board of Directors, said, “Our neighbors chose to live in Emerson in part because of the high academic standards of nearby Howard County public and private schools. , and Emerson’s relaxed natural setting. Our community speaks out every day on its values ​​of embracing diversity and inclusion, education and lifelong learning, protecting our environment and wildlife habitats, and bringing neighbors together through fun events. .

Advertising

About Emerson Community Association: The community of Emerson is located in North Laurel, Howard County, spanning over 570 acres and comprising over 1,200 high-end residential and rental townhouses, single-family homes, condominiums and apartments, as well as commercial office and retail space in the Emerson Corporate Commons. A third of the community is set aside for forest conservation and open green space. For more information, please visit www.EmersonHOA.com.

About Associa: With more than 200 locations across North America, Associa is building the future of community for nearly five million residents worldwide. Our 10,000+ team members lead the industry with unparalleled training, expertise and pioneering innovation. For more than 43 years, Associa has brought positive impact and significant value to communities. For more information, visit www.associaonline.com

###

Emerson completed one of many forest restoration projects with Howard EcoWorks and installed a test Bayscape Garden in his Amberside neighborhood.

Emerson is transitioning to non-invasive native plants for landscaping and a “one-for-one” tree replacement program.

###

You can view the press release via PDF here: PRESS RELEASE_Associa Award_13JAN22

Scott E.

]]>
32 single-family homes proposed for former Edison School site | New policies https://avvensanchea.com/32-single-family-homes-proposed-for-former-edison-school-site-new-policies/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/32-single-family-homes-proposed-for-former-edison-school-site-new-policies/ WATERLOO — A Cedar Falls developer is proposing to build dozens of single-family homes on the site of the former Edison Elementary School, though some neighbors are still wary of lot sizes, high cost of homes and water issues potentials. Kevin Fittro of Panther Builders, which has several developments in the area such as Prairie […]]]>

WATERLOO — A Cedar Falls developer is proposing to build dozens of single-family homes on the site of the former Edison Elementary School, though some neighbors are still wary of lot sizes, high cost of homes and water issues potentials.

Kevin Fittro of Panther Builders, which has several developments in the area such as Prairie West and Twin Oaks in Cedar Falls, Eagle Reach in Waverly, and West Echo in Jesup, plans to build 32 single-family homes along the west side of Magnolia Parkway, north of Falls Avenue, south of Bismark Avenue, and east east of an alley near Evergreen Avenue in Waterloo.

Fittro is proposing to set aside 2.2 acres on the northeast portion of the seven-acre parcel for parkland in Magnolia and Bismark, which will be funded by the city at an estimated cost of $350,000.

A portion south along Falls Avenue will be set aside for future commercial development, consistent with how the city originally zoned the site in 2019. The developer also plans to leave four large oak trees in place, according to the city.

People also read…

“The 32 lots of single-family homes will retain the character and size of existing residential properties in the area, (which) are primarily comprised of one-story and one-and-a-half-story homes,” city staff wrote in their recommendation. .

Fittro’s proposal went through a Tuesday morning meeting of the Waterloo Leisure Services Commission. But it encountered some opposition from neighbors at a Tuesday night meeting of Waterloo planning, programming and zoning before that council recommended 4-1-1 approval, commissioners Sue Flynn voting no and Ali Parrish abstaining. The city council should take it up in February.

Fittro said he expected homes to sell for between $220,000 and $290,000, “not a price at all in this neighborhood,” said neighbor Jay Hileman, who lives on Evergreen Avenue and has noted that homes there are rated for at least half.

Hileman noted that he’s also concerned that not adding curbs and gutters could cause water issues on his property, which others have also expressed concerns about, including councilman Dave Boesen.

“The new roads won’t have curbs and gutters – that seems to be a problem,” Boesen said.

City Engineer Jamie Knutson said he didn’t think there was much to do, as the surrounding area has no stormwater retention.

“Any flooding now will still be there” after a development begins, Knutson said. “If the commission wants to put that caveat out there, that’s certainly up to them.”

Janet Collins, who lives in Magnolia, said the 40ft pitches – which her property also sits on – are “not big enough”, which resident Forrest Dillavou agreed with.

“Yes, there are 40ft pitches all around Waterloo, but aren’t we looking to improve?” said Dillavou.

Fittro noted that Panther Builders was also “concerned about stormwater retention,” but noted that the lot number made the most economical sense and matched the surrounding neighborhood.

“They already have these lot sizes. The number of units per acre is no different,” he said. “It made sense for us to leave them as they are.”

It’s the first proposal to come before the city since strong neighborhood opposition derailed a $1 million housing and park plan by Jon Brundrett of 5 Bees LLC.

Brundrett planned to pay for a handicap-accessible park and donate it to the city after 10 years, but that was contingent on approval of Magnolia Place, a proposed 10 four-plex townhouse complex on the site. Although the project survived a zoning board vote, Brundrett pulled the development in August before the city council voted on it after dozens of neighbors signed a petition opposing it.

Waterloo is considering its own handicap-accessible park, but Edison's neighbors oppose 4-plexes

Neighbors told the city at the time that they only wanted single-family homes, and Edison Neighborhood Association President Rachel Neil reminded fellow residents of that at Tuesday’s meeting.

“There were certain things that the neighborhood strongly communicated that they wanted and desired for this land, and so far everything we see here responds to that,” Neil said, noting that the proposed park was also bigger than the neighbors expected.

Neighbors told the city in December that their priorities for a park include a mulch-covered playground, a swing set, a small shelter, six picnic tables, five park benches, a basketball court half lot, electricity and water service, a 5-foot walking trail and a bike rack.

With a new developer on board, Edison's neighborhood is set to reclaim the park

The Waterloo Community School District closed Edison in 2011 after 97 years of operation, and it was demolished in 2016.

Eagle Island, the wooden playground built on the site in 1994, was demolished by the district in May 2015 for safety reasons. The land was then ceded to the City of Waterloo.

With the loss of Edison School and Eagle Island, neighbors ask Waterloo for a new park

]]>
Proposed City Market apartment tower hailed as model for future development https://avvensanchea.com/proposed-city-market-apartment-tower-hailed-as-model-for-future-development/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 15:59:38 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/proposed-city-market-apartment-tower-hailed-as-model-for-future-development/ Share this story Posted 2 hours ago Image credit above: Flaherty & Collins offers a 13-story apartment tower for parking immediately west of the town market. (Render | KEM Studio) A planned 13-story, 300-unit apartment development just west of the city’s market was approved by a Port KC committee on Monday after being hailed by […]]]>

Share this story

Image credit above: Flaherty & Collins offers a 13-story apartment tower for parking immediately west of the town market. (Render | KEM Studio)

A planned 13-story, 300-unit apartment development just west of the city’s market was approved by a Port KC committee on Monday after being hailed by the city manager as a model for future downtown development. city.

The proposed $ 75 million project for what is now a city-owned parking lot would occupy a one-acre site and include a 260-space garage that is significantly smaller than the 400-space structure originally proposed.

“Considering its proximity to the streetcar and the density of this area, it’s a different direction than what we’ve seen in many developments in the city,” said City Manager Brian Platt.

“Three hundred units per acre is a lot. This will be the start of a new level of high density development in the River Market and downtown. Hopefully we will move more towards this type of agreement in the future. “

Port KC development committee supported developer’s plan Flaherty & Collins of Indianapolis by a 5-1 vote. It has yet to be approved by the entire Port KC board of directors. If successful, work could begin by the fall.

The proposed apartment tower would be located on a city-owned parking lot just west of the municipal market. (Image | Flaherty & Collins Presentation)

“We are absolutely delighted to move forward,” said Ryan Cronk, vice president of Flaherty & Collins.

The project would set aside 20% of its units as affordable, 15% for households earning less than 70% of metropolitan median family income (MFI) and 5% at less than 50% percent of MFIs.

The Kansas City-area MFI was $ 86,600 for a four-person household in 2021, according to a chart provided by the developer.

To help fund the project, Flaherty & Collins is seeking a 25-year property tax rebate that would start at 85% the first five years and gradually decrease to 25% the last five years. He is also seeking relief from the sales tax on building materials.

As city-owned land, the property currently pays no property tax.

City Councilor Kevin O’Neill, a member of the Port KC board of directors, cast the only vote against, repeating his claim that the streetcar should be seen as enough of an incentive for developers.

Flaherty & Collins was one of two developers which responded to a call for tenders from Port KC over two years ago. The redevelopment plan calls for the city to transfer the parking lot to the authority who would then negotiate an agreement with the developer.

A ground level view of the Flaherty & Collins proposition opposite the City Market.
A ground level view of the Flaherty & Collins proposition opposite the City Market. (Render | KEM Studio)

The proposed project encountered obstacles along the way, including the Federal Aviation Administration’s reluctance over its height, and concerns from downtown advocates that its original 400-seat garage proposal was too large.

The FAA has given provisional approval for the 13-story height, significantly higher than the seven to eight stories originally envisioned by the agency. The FAA has authority over building heights due to flight paths to Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport.

The planned garage will no longer replace the 160 public spaces that exist above ground. It will now include 20 paid public spaces and 20 free spaces for City Market tenants. The remaining 220 places are reserved for residents.

There will also be 23 surface spaces on the site available to the public.

Brian Rabineau, general counsel for Port KC, said the garage had been reduced in size at the request of “stakeholders” at River Market.

“There were a lot of concerns about overconstruction of parking lots in this part of town,” he said. “Given that it is on an active public transport (tram) line and following this entry, the current plan is to reduce this parking as previously stated.”

The decision to downsize the garage was praised by Derek Hoetmer, chair of the Planning and Development Committee of the Downtown Neighborhood Association.

“The city center is full of very visible land in prime locations like this, which is only dedicated to the storage of automobiles,” he said. “We believe the city is in desperate need of more projects like this to continue building momentum for the 21st century. “

As part of the development proposal, Flaherty & Collins would also spend $ 500,000 to improve the River Market green space immediately north of the project.

Another view of the proposed Flaherty & Collins Tower looking south.  The developer proposes to spend $ 500,000 to improve the green space shown in the foreground.
Another view of the proposed Flaherty & Collins Tower looking south. The developer proposes to spend $ 500,000 to improve the green space shown in the foreground. (Render | KEM Studio)

The initial 85% property tax deduction requested was criticized as being too large by Kathleen Pointer, a representative for Kansas City public schools. She also noted that the expected rents were not affordable for families.

Sixty of the apartments would be set aside as affordable. At the 70% MFI level, monthly studio rents would be $ 1,061; one bedroom, $ 1,212, and two bedrooms, $ 1,364.

At the MFI at 50%, studio rents would be $ 758; one bedroom, $ 866 and two bedrooms, $ 974. Full monthly rents at market rates for the remaining 240 units would be $ 1,250 for a studio; $ 1,800 for a one bedroom and $ 2,400 for a two bedroom.

These rents include all utilities, according to the developer. The project was also presented more than a year before the city council adopted stricter affordable requirements.

In a nearly 1.5-hour discussion, supporters of the project, including Platt, said the proposal would help meet the city’s affordable housing goals.

Two members of the Port KC board of directors, City Councilor Katheryn Shields and former City Councilor Deb Hermann, noted that larger rent cuts would likely require cash grants from the city or other public entities to that numbers work for developers.

“I remember this site stayed the way it has been for 30 or 35 years, giving nothing to tax jurisdictions and offering no opportunities to anyone,” Hermann said.

“I would love to see a higher ratio of affordable housing, but we’ll have to find more public money to make that happen. “

Flatland contributor Kevin Collison is the founder of CityScene KC, an online source for downtown news and issues.

Do you like what you read ?

Discover more untold stories about Kansas City, every Thursday.

Thank you for subscribing!

Check your inbox, you should see something from us.

]]> Teasing Master Takagi-san Anime Gets A Smartphone Game https://avvensanchea.com/teasing-master-takagi-san-anime-gets-a-smartphone-game/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 05:22:07 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/teasing-master-takagi-san-anime-gets-a-smartphone-game/ TV anime Tease Master Takagi-san is obtain a smartphone game in spring. TOHO games will release the game. The popular two-season anime inspired the plot and creation of the game. The “First Love Tapping Game” will feature all songs from the anime. Along with the songs from the anime, the game will also contain original […]]]>

TV anime Tease Master Takagi-san is obtain a smartphone game in spring. TOHO games will release the game.

The popular two-season anime inspired the plot and creation of the game. The “First Love Tapping Game” will feature all songs from the anime. Along with the songs from the anime, the game will also contain original songs by singer-songwriter Yukio Ohara. In the story originally created for the game, Takagi trains with songs after joining the neighborhood association’s karaoke tournament. The player taps to send “kyun” (hearts) to encourage Takagi.

Teasing from Master Takagi-san Sweet story

Teasing from Master Takagi-san the third season premiered on TSB’s Animism block on January 7. For those in the west, Sentai Filmworks via HDIVE took care of delivering the anime. The company has also authorized the film that will open this year. the third season also introduces original staff and voice actors. The story for Tease Master Takagi-san is described as:

Nishikata has vowed to get her classmate Takagi back because he’s tired of being mercilessly teased. He wants to tease the girl who made him blush countless times! After all, if you blush, you lose! But getting revenge isn’t that easy when every attempt blows in his face. Will Nishikata one day make Takagi blush, or will he gain something more fulfilling from his clumsy attempts?

Crisp aired the first two seasons when they air in Japan. After its original airing, Funimation aired the series with an English dub. The second season kicked off in July 2019 on Netflix. At this time, it’s unclear when the third season of the anime will be available on Netflix.

At the same time, it is not the first video game that the franchise has produced. Tease Master Takagi-san The 1st and 2nd VR semesters were also launched for Oculus Quest in December 2020.

teasing Master Takagi-san The love tapping video game does not yet have an official release date.


Source link

]]>
Plans for Mill Park take shape “East PDX News https://avvensanchea.com/plans-for-mill-park-take-shape-east-pdx-news/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 05:55:29 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/plans-for-mill-park-take-shape-east-pdx-news/ Find out what Mill Park neighbors are saying about proposed development plans for their park in the eastern outskirts of Portland… Unlike their sweltering summer reunion, the neighbors now dress warmly, as they attend the Mill Park Community Gathering comment on the development plans of their still undeveloped park. Story and photos by David F. […]]]>

Find out what Mill Park neighbors are saying about proposed development plans for their park in the eastern outskirts of Portland…

Unlike their sweltering summer reunion, the neighbors now dress warmly, as they attend the Mill Park Community Gathering comment on the development plans of their still undeveloped park.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton

Step by step plans for the large undeveloped area behind, east of Mill Park Elementary School, on a property owned by Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) called Mill Park, are being created .

>> CLICK HERE to learn more about past Mill Park Development community meetings.

PP&R held its last “Mill Park Community Gathering” on the afternoon of November 30, in the indoor play area behind the school, facing the park.

These participants reflect on the advantages of “Design Option 2, Oasis.

“About 40 people attended this Mill Park community meeting,” said Maija Spencer, PP&R Senior Community Engagement Coordinator.

“We also organized a ZOOM Community gathering in partnership with the Midway Alliance Division on November 16, using the ‘interpretation strings’ feature, and we offered interpretation in seven languages: Arabic, Chinese, Karen, Nepalese, Somali, Spanish and Vietnamese, ”Spencer said.

Showing what turned out to be the first choice, “Design option 3, PaseoIs Maija Spencer, PP&R Senior Community Engagement Coordinator.

Between the two meetings, they received a total of 90 comments online and via paper comment forms, Spencer said. East Portland News.

Since these recent meetings, their design company – Meyer Reed – is reviewing all community contributions and working on the “final preferred design” which will be shared with PP&R staff, the Mill Park Project Advisory Committee (MPPAC) and the community at large, for feedback in early 2022.

People prefer a “Paseo”
“Through in-person events, online meetings and online surveys, and with input from MPPAC, we heard a strong preference for Option 3, ‘Paseo’; so that’s the advanced theme for the final design, ”Spencer revealed.

By the way, the Spanish word Paseo indicates a place for “a leisurely stroll or stroll” or “to wander”.

“People liked the way it creates two open zones, which provides more opportunities for different activities – and they liked that the central promenade created a safe route to the school from SE 122nd Avenue,” noted Spencer.

After browsing the exhibits and chatting with the project designers, neighbors are encouraged to take a survey.

“We also heard that the community is prioritizing more tall trees and shade opportunities, given the extreme heat this summer and the lack of canopy and natural spaces in East Portland,” said she relayed. “Other priorities included gathering / picnic areas, a play area and play area, and the community garden; but parking is a low priority for most, especially if at the expense of other park elements.

>> To view a PDF document that details the summary report of comments from the last series of meetings: CLICK HERE.

Mill to park Neighborhood Association president Trevor Hopper completes project survey before heading to work.

“Now that I’ve seen an evolution in the choices we have, I really like the changes to the original master plan for Mill Park,” said Mill Park Neighborhood Association President Trevor Hopper, adding that ‘he only spoke for himself.

“It seems that a lot of people, including me, prefer the third option, the Paseo, in which everything passes in the middle of the park, ”added Hopper. “It looks like it will increase the energy [by] have many more consolidated features – and, at the same time, keep certain noise levels away from neighbors who live near the park.

Updating the timeline
The final engagement phase where PP&R and its design consultants will share the preferred design for final community feedback will take place in March 2022.

“Based on current public health guidelines at that time, this will likely be similar to past engagement, with options for online / virtual and in-person participation,” Spencer speculated.

Following this:
Spring 2022 – Spring 2023 – Design development, construction documents, tenders and permits

Spring 2023 – Summer 2024 – Construction

Learn more about the Mill Park Development Project by visiting the official PP&R webpage: CLICK HERE.

© 2022 David F. Ashton ~ East Portland News ™


Source link

]]>
Edward Jelks Obituary (1922 – 2021) – Denver, CO https://avvensanchea.com/edward-jelks-obituary-1922-2021-denver-co/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 02:20:59 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/edward-jelks-obituary-1922-2021-denver-co/ ObituariesEd Jelks, 99, passed away peacefully on the evening of December 22, 2021 in Denver, Colorado, where he had lived for three and a half years to be close to his son and his family. In accordance with his wishes, there will be no visitation, funeral or other services. Horan and McConaty Funeral Home, Centennial, […]]]>

Obituaries
Ed Jelks, 99, passed away peacefully on the evening of December 22, 2021 in Denver, Colorado, where he had lived for three and a half years to be close to his son and his family. In accordance with his wishes, there will be no visitation, funeral or other services. Horan and McConaty Funeral Home, Centennial, CO, helped the family organize the cremation. Condolences can be posted on their website.
Ed was born September 10, 1922 in Macon, Georgia, the son of Oliver Robinson Jelks and Lucille Jarrett Jelks. On August 12, 1944, he married Juliette Elizabeth Christian, who was predeceased by him. His parents and a brother, Oliver Jr., also predeceased him. Survived by a son, Chris (Joan) Jelks of Aurora, Colorado, two grandsons, Devin (Devin) Jelks and Scott (Heather) Jelks, and two great-granddaughters Olivia and Amelia Jelks, all living in Parker, CO.
As a member of the Navy Hospital during WWII, Ed was stationed at the Acorn Navy Field Hospital in Guadalcanal and the No.6 Mobile Hospital in Auckland, New Zealand. After completing his studies as an officer at the University of Notre Dame, he was appointed professor in May 1945 and was honorably demobilized with the rank of LTJG in November 1945.
Ed has spent over 50 years as an archaeologist for the Smithsonian Institution, the National Park Service, the University of Texas at Austin, Southern Methodist University, and Illinois State University. He has excavated prehistoric and historic archaeological sites in Texas, Louisiana, Virginia, Illinois, New York, Wyoming, Newfoundland and the Marshall Islands in the South Pacific. He is the author or co-author of numerous published articles, monographs and books. His wife Juliet accompanied him on several of his projects in the field, where they worked as a team. They compiled and edited the Historical Dictionary of North American Archeology, which was named the Library Journal’s best reference work in 1988.
Ed has played an active role in professional archaeological societies. He was a founder and president of the Society of Professional Archaeologists and the Society for Historical Archeology. He was president of the Texas Archeological Society and the Illinois Archaeological Survey. As the United States Representative for Anthropology to the Pan American Institute of Geography and History, an agency of the Organization of American States, from 1977 to 1993, he chaired meetings of the Archaeological Committee of the Institute in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Brazil, Costa Rica. , Mexico and Puerto Rico.
Ed had a BA in English, an MA in Anthropology, and a Doctorate. in Anthropology, all from the University of Texas at Austin. Among his awards are the JC Harrington Medal for his contributions to historical archeology, the Clarence Webb Prize for his contributions to Caddoan archeology, and the Society of Professional Archeologists Distinguished Service Award. He was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and Honorary Research Fellow of the Smithsonian Institution. It has been listed in Who’s Who in America (1982-1997) and in Who’s Who in The World (1984-1989).
Ed was professor of anthropology at Illinois State University from 1968 until his retirement in 1983, where he established and directed the Midwest Archaeological Center and was a member of the ISU Million Dollar Club for earning over ‘$ 1 million in extramural grants and contractual support for the ISU Research Program.
Ed was director of the McLean County Historical Society and was president of the society from 1983 to 1985. He served on both the Illinois Historic Preservation Commission and the Normal Historic Preservation Commission. He was an organizer and first president of the Neighbors Association of Normal and the School Street Neighborhood Association. The city council named him Normal Citizen of the Year in 2004.
Over a period of approximately 40 years, Ed and Juliet have fostered dozens of international students. In 2000, they were awarded a bronze plaque in Beijing by the Chinese Ministry of Culture for their efforts in supporting Chinese exchange students.
In 2018, after the death of his wife Juliet, Ed moved into a self-catering apartment at Legacy Village in Castle Pines, CO. There, he started a residents’ council and a popular singing activity for residents. Ed loved being close to his family and getting to know his young great-granddaughters.
A group of former students and colleagues from Ed recently established the Edward and Juliet Jelks Scholarship at Illinois State University. Those wishing to donate in memory of Ed can do so at: https://scholarshipfinder.illinoisstate.edu/scholarships/edward-and-juliet-jelks-scholarship/.
Ed will be remembered by the many people whose lives he touched.

Posted by Horan & McConaty – South Metro / Centennial on January 5, 2022.


Source link

]]>