Neighborhood Association – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 04:50:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://avvensanchea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6.png Neighborhood Association – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ 32 32 Springfest returns to Toonerville Trolley Park in Old Louisville | New https://avvensanchea.com/springfest-returns-to-toonerville-trolley-park-in-old-louisville-new/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 23:36:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/springfest-returns-to-toonerville-trolley-park-in-old-louisville-new/ LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – Old Louisville’s biggest spring festival and market was held late this year. It was the ninth annual Old Louisville Springfest as food and vendors returned to Toonerville Trolley Park. The event brought together 10 food trucks and 80 artisan vendors from eight different states. Some of them sell products that you […]]]>

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – Old Louisville’s biggest spring festival and market was held late this year.

It was the ninth annual Old Louisville Springfest as food and vendors returned to Toonerville Trolley Park.

The event brought together 10 food trucks and 80 artisan vendors from eight different states. Some of them sell products that you can only find at Springfest.

Springfest event president Kirk Stewart said that due to the increase in COVID-19 cases, the spring event had to be pushed further into the fall.

“The easy thing would have been not to have the event this year, but we felt like we owed the arts community to have this event and frankly the neighborhood wanted it too,” said Stewart.

The event also featured a LouVax booth. People 21 and older who received the Johnson and Johnson vaccines from the booth also received a free adult drink.

Money raised from the event will go to the Neighborhood Association to help reduce crime and keep old Louisville looking great.

“This is our opportunity to showcase this amazing neighborhood which is the largest collection of Victorian homes in the country and is located here in the heart of old Louisville,” said Stewart.

Copyright 2021 WDRB Media. All rights reserved.



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Community in brief: 09/18/21 | Local News https://avvensanchea.com/community-in-brief-09-18-21-local-news/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 12:30:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/community-in-brief-09-18-21-local-news/ Concerts under the porch are scheduled TRAVERSE CITY – The Traverse City Central Neighborhood Association is hosting its third annual PorchFest from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on September 19. Over 35 musical artists perform on residential porches from Fifth to 13th Street. Find the concert plans and schedules on TCPorchFest.org. Children’s programs TRAVERSE CITY […]]]>

Concerts under the porch are scheduled

TRAVERSE CITY – The Traverse City Central Neighborhood Association is hosting its third annual PorchFest from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on September 19. Over 35 musical artists perform on residential porches from Fifth to 13th Street. Find the concert plans and schedules on TCPorchFest.org.

Children’s programs

TRAVERSE CITY – The Great Lakes Children’s Museum runs weekly programs for preschool and elementary school students. Entrance to the museum is $ 7 per person. Register on glcm.org.

Events:

  • Painting a sunflower plate at 10 a.m., 1 p.m. or 3:20 p.m. and Sept. 23
  • Storytime Adventures: “The Dog With Kittens” at 10 am, 1 pm or 3 pm Sept 22 and 24.

Yoga sessions

EMPIRE – Kaye Evans leads gentle yoga practices from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays at Empire Township Hall. A $ 5 donation is suggested.

Visual arts exhibition planned

PETOSKEY – Crooked Tree Arts Center presents the exhibit “Kindred: Traditional Arts of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians” until November 27th. This visual arts exhibit showcases the arts and crafts of Odawa from collectors across the state.

The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Tuesday to Saturday. Contact alissa@crookedtree.org to schedule a guided tour.

Reiki classes

TRAVERSE CITY – Sally Littleton leads a reiki class Tuesdays from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. from September 21 to October 19 via Zoom. Reiki is an alternative medicine called energy healing. Register via nmc.edu/ees.

“Confluence” event

TRAVERSE CITY – For Love of Water (FLOW) celebrates its 10th anniversary with “Confluence” at 7pm on September 21 via Zoom. The event includes the tribute to FLOW President and President Jim Olson and Senior Advisor Dave Dempsey, insight into the history of the organization and more.

NMEAC program

TRAVERSE CITY – The Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council is holding its annual Environmentalist of the Year celebration at 7 p.m. on September 23. The virtual program features guest speaker Kate Madigan, Michigan Climate Action Network, and music host Jeremy Reisig. Register for free on nmeac.org.

The game resumes at Old Town Playhouse

TRAVERSE CITY – Old Town Playhouse adds a performance of “Escanaba in da Moonlight” to its program. The show begins September 23 at 7:30 p.m. Prices are $ 28 for adults and $ 15 for youth. Ticket office: 231-947-2210.

ISEA is looking for donations for the flea market, for sale

SUTTONS BAY – The Inland Seas Education Association is seeking donations for next year’s flea market and boat sale. Items accepted include anchors, mooring balls, boat hardware, oars, life jackets, boating equipment and more. Email icooper@schoolship.org to schedule a depot.

Launch of the Disabled People’s Network podcast

TRAVERSE CITY – Disability Network Northern Michigan recently released their second podcast on community connections, “Youth Successful Transitions”. Executive Director Jim Moore and Community Resource Specialist Nicole Miller discuss the transition of youth to adulthood. Listen to the podcast on handicapnetwork.org.


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Heritage festival kicks off Saturday in Frenchtown https://avvensanchea.com/heritage-festival-kicks-off-saturday-in-frenchtown/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 23:06:38 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/heritage-festival-kicks-off-saturday-in-frenchtown/ TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) – Michael Hicks has his hands full rolling and kneading in this kitchen he rents at the Frenchtown Heritage Hub. “I focus on four main items that I have each week, namely donuts, cinnamon buns, bagels, and focaccia bread.” Hicks owns Expanding Circles Bakery and says much of its success is due […]]]>

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) – Michael Hicks has his hands full rolling and kneading in this kitchen he rents at the Frenchtown Heritage Hub.

“I focus on four main items that I have each week, namely donuts, cinnamon buns, bagels, and focaccia bread.”

Hicks owns Expanding Circles Bakery and says much of its success is due to Frenchtown.

“They really worked with me as a new business and helped me get back on my feet.”

Expanding Circles Bakery is just one of many vendors you’ll find this Saturday in one of Florida’s oldest African-American neighborhoods.

“This festival actually showcases Frenchtown Market Square and the Heritage Center.”

Meltonia Chandler talks about the annual heritage festival. She is the Program Operations Director for Frenchtown Neighborhood Improvement Association, an organization that serves the community by giving back. She comes from a family that knows how to cultivate and help those in need. It’s something that Chandler and others in this neighborhood often do with the food she grows.

“We actually prepare the food and distribute it because it’s one thing to give them food in the can or just frozen food, but preparing is one thing because most of them have a hard time. prepare food or they have no room to prepare. “

From now on, the pride of Frenchtown will be on display at the corner of Martin Luther King Boulevard and Georgia Street. Businesses, people positively impacted by Frenchtown Market Place meet on Saturday.

The festival runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will feature many local businesses and entertainment.


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Shouldn’t real estate ads be based on facts? – Silicon Valley https://avvensanchea.com/shouldnt-real-estate-ads-be-based-on-facts-silicon-valley/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 11:02:51 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/shouldnt-real-estate-ads-be-based-on-facts-silicon-valley/ Q: Real estate agents in our neighborhood are valuing properties hundreds of thousands of dollars below comparable sales. We live in an expensive enclave of suburban homes known for its good schools. The knowledgeable seller’s agent we hired to be our listing broker competently appraised our home for sale. In need of refreshing, the property […]]]>

Q: Real estate agents in our neighborhood are valuing properties hundreds of thousands of dollars below comparable sales. We live in an expensive enclave of suburban homes known for its good schools. The knowledgeable seller’s agent we hired to be our listing broker competently appraised our home for sale. In need of refreshing, the property is on the busy street that feeds into the neighborhood, and the price reflects this inescapable fact. After our home was put up for sale, three renovated homes within the neighborhood were put on the market at or below our list price. My husband is apoplectic. We have valued our house on the basis of facts.

We have learned that surprisingly low priced properties are a rare but deliberate tactic. The goal in our area is for seller’s agents to later brag about selling a property for $ 250,000, $ 350,000 or more above the list price after receiving a ridiculously large number of offers. In the meantime, our ad – which doesn’t sell – appears to be overpriced depending on condition and location. Are house prices significantly under-priced by 5-10% based on comparable sales, considered acceptable behavior by your trade associations and the state real estate department?

A: In some areas, the adequately priced Bay Area listings received higher bids for the median house price in each of these categories: the US, California, and Santa Clara County. For example, according to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the median price of homes in America for the second quarter of 2021 is $ 374,900. The California Association of Realtors reports that the existing, median-priced single-family home as of July 2021 in California was $ 811,170 and in Santa Clara County, $ 1,670,000.

I have written about this questionable practice of deliberately priceing properties incredibly low. This is a practice frowned upon by most rookies and veterans of the real estate community. I’ve heard complaints from disgruntled potential buyers who knew something was wrong with them being new to home shopping. Conversely, many neighborhoods have residents who know which selling agents are pricing significantly lower than comparable sales.

Again, I consulted with a real estate lawyer who warned me not to give legal advice as a real estate broker. As always, real estate lawyers tell me this is an opportunity to enter the arena of false advertising. See the problems in Section 1 of the California Business and Professional Code. False advertising in general 17,500 BPCs here.

Worse yet, the hosts of the open houses inform potential buyers that the property will sell for a predetermined price well above the advertised price. This kind of first-visit dialogue with potential buyers is the worst of first impressions.

Questions? Real estate agent Pat Kapowich is a licensed real estate brokerage manager and a lifelong consumer protection advocate. 408-245-7700, Pat@SiliconValleyBroker.com DRE # 00979413 SiliconValleyBroker.com YouTube.com/PatKapowich


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The horror of the neighborhood finally demolished after five years https://avvensanchea.com/the-horror-of-the-neighborhood-finally-demolished-after-five-years/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 23:10:46 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/the-horror-of-the-neighborhood-finally-demolished-after-five-years/ An excavator dismantles part of the roof at 1504 Sixth Ave. SE in Wellington Heights Thursday morning at Cedar Rapids. Hope Community Development Association, purchased the fire damaged property and built a three bedroom house on the site. (Savannah Blake / The Gazette) CEDAR RAPIDS – An excavator slowly lifts itself up, opening its jaws […]]]>

An excavator dismantles part of the roof at 1504 Sixth Ave. SE in Wellington Heights Thursday morning at Cedar Rapids. Hope Community Development Association, purchased the fire damaged property and built a three bedroom house on the site. (Savannah Blake / The Gazette)

CEDAR RAPIDS – An excavator slowly lifts itself up, opening its jaws to grab a large chunk of the roof, then crushes chunks of wood, shingles and twisted metal on the collapsed porch.

A Wellington Heights rental home at 1504 Sixth Ave. SE – which caught fire in 2017 and has been a neighborhood horror for five years – was finally demolished on Thursday.

“It’s a blessing to see this demolished,” said Charles Cook, who once lived next to the damaged house. “I lived here for five years and never thought I would see this. I just visited my mom and heard it was being demolished. I had to come see him.

Cook, who now lives in Arizona, said he was still worried about seeing his children and others playing outside after the fire because there was glass and debris everywhere. The city eventually closed the house, but nothing else happened.

“It’s just an eyesore on the block,” Cook said. “There was another house that caught fire just down the street, but it was demolished right away. “

New house coming soon

Hope Community Development Association will now build a new house on the land.

Ron Ziegler, executive director of the association, first spoke to The Gazette in April about his group’s desire to demolish and replace the house. A federal grant of $ 100,000, administered by the city, made this possible.

“The demolition of the house would have been impossible without the grant money,” Ziegler said. “This will be our first new house under construction. We have renovated 12 houses and have two under construction, and this will be our third.

About $ 65,000 will go to the house, and the rest will be used for another house, Ziegler said.

The upcoming demolition and construction, he said, is the perfect analogy for the mission of the Christian nonprofit association: “to take something that is not worth it and rebuild the lives of the people. men. It visualizes the changes in life.

The nonprofit will market the new affordable home for sale to a low-income family, which will help revitalize the neighborhood and train Hope Community participants – men released from prison or drugs, who face barriers to employment.

Theix men in the training program and learn on the job. Ken Hart, the volunteer construction manager, will teach and guide the men through the framing, coating and insulation work.

Ziegler said Ken-Way Excavation donated its labor on Thursday for the demolition, which was more expensive than other such work because the blaze left environmental issues behind and asbestos.

The rubble from the house will be crushed and transported by Ken-Way, who will also fill in the hole left before the foundation for the new house is laid.

Ray Phillipson Concrete in Marion and Manchester donated free labor to help with the construction. An electrician has offered his job and the search for a plumber willing to help is underway.

Eight Days of Hope, a nonprofit Christian disaster relief organization in Tupelo, Mississippi, donated building materials.

The nonprofit relies on donations for its rehabilitation program, but it is still difficult to break even and generate profits to reinvest in the programs, said Hart, a former teacher at the school store. of Maquoketa Valley and guidance counselor.

Those two jobs, he said, prepared him to teach men in the Hope program who are looking for a new life.

Hart said the men asked him spiritual, emotional and reshaping questions.

“They’re wearing me out,” Hart said with a laugh. “It has been interesting and I really appreciate it. It was fun to do something new.

Ziegler said construction projects usually take longer because the men aren’t skilled workers, but he hopes to complete the new three-bedroom house in a year.

This year, the men will work on the house “until the snow clears,” Hart said, adding hope that they would not have any problems obtaining building materials and lumber now that prices drop from pandemic highs.

Comments: (319) 398-8318; trish.mehaffey@thegazette.com

Hope’s executive director Ron Ziegler (right) gathers around the members of Hope and prays for the demolition and reconstruction of the house at 1504 Sixth Avenue SE Thursday morning in Cedar Rapids. The nonprofit will build a three bedroom house on the land for sale to a low income family. (Savannah Blake / The Gazette)

Charles Cook watches a fire-damaged house razed to the ground Thursday morning on Sixth Avenue SE in Cedar Rapids. Cook once lived next door to the rental house, when it burned down in 2017, and said he believed he would never see the day it was demolished. Cook now lives in Arizona and his stepson now lives in the house next door to what is now a vacant lot and will become the site of a new home. (Savannah Blake / The Gazette)

This is what the fire damaged house looks like at 1504 Sixth Ave. SE at Cedar Rapids for the past five years. The house was demolished on Thursday. (The Gazette)


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Parks Council says no to compromise on parks https://avvensanchea.com/parks-council-says-no-to-compromise-on-parks/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 05:04:43 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/parks-council-says-no-to-compromise-on-parks/ The Austin Parks and Recreation Council voted unanimously at Tuesday’s meeting to dismiss a developer’s appeal for city regulations for the allocation of a park for an apartment complex offered at 403 E. Koenig Lane. Only six board members – the minimum for a quorum – attended the meeting at the Zilker Botanical Garden. The […]]]>

The Austin Parks and Recreation Council voted unanimously at Tuesday’s meeting to dismiss a developer’s appeal for city regulations for the allocation of a park for an apartment complex offered at 403 E. Koenig Lane. Only six board members – the minimum for a quorum – attended the meeting at the Zilker Botanical Garden.

The case will now go to the Planning Commission with a recommendation against allowing the owner, Seco Ventures, to configure a dedicated park on the property in a way that allows it to maximize housing, including affordable housing. If the development is built as Seco Ventures wishes, there will be 434 units, including 44 affordable vertical mixed-use (VMU) units.

However, Seco’s attorney, Michael Whellan of Armbrust and Brown, argued that if the developer builds according to the Parks Department’s proposals, he would lose at least 42 units in total, including five affordable apartments.

Whellan said the affordable housing offered is tied to Seco growing under VMU and having to provide 10 percent of total units subject to on-site income. Losing units as proposed by the departmental parks plan “would make the project financially difficult to justify due to other constraints … said to the Austin Monitor.

Staff members had suggested in their presentation that the developer could fix the issue by working under the city’s Affordability Unlocked program. However, the developer is not participating in this program, which operates with city grants and requires a much higher level of accessibility, noted Whellan.

Board chair Dawn Lewis asked Whellan why they couldn’t solve their problem just by building higher. He told her they couldn’t do it because the property is next to a single family neighborhood. She asked if they could get a gap. Whellan responded that he believed there had been maybe five waivers granted in the past 20 years.

He stressed the idea that the city “can meet both our housing and green space needs without opposing the two”. But under the Parks Department’s rules, staff members said they are not allowed to consider affordable housing unless the housing generally falls under the smart housing category.

Under city regulations, because the 6.5-acre site is in the urban core, the park requirement is only 0.98 acres. The promoter offers two parks in buttons, an east side and a west side. They will be connected by a proposed transit park connector. In addition, the proponent proposes to offer amenities within the Austin Energy easement. The utility agreed to license the amenities, but PARD rejected the idea.

Whellan also argues that the parks department needs the money it would get from its client’s donation. As he said in his presentation to the board, PARD spends around 25 to 30 percent of park development costs on improving neighborhoods, buttons and pocket parks. At the rate they spend, the “long-term financial responsibility of the ministry for these parks represents about 3,590% of its annual revenues for these parks,” he said.

According to the department’s calculations, the Koenig development will add 434 units and around 737 new residents to a neighborhood already devoid of parks. The ministry asserted that the configuration of the park in the manner proposed by the applicant “would not mean that no park is dedicated to this development of the site”.

This is not how Whellan sees it. He said his client was prepared to provide park space and on-site improvements and pay a 100 percent fee in lieu. Allowing the developer’s proposed configuration “would provide more ‘landscaped’ park space,” more park improvements and more revenue for city parks, he said.

Parks department planner Robynne Heymans told the board that the area is considered park-deficient, with no park space within a quarter mile. She said staff could not recommend the configuration proposed by the requester and the ministry was not allowed to consider a cash donation.

Including the button parks and the Austin Energy easement, the park area with amenities would total 1.1 acres with an estimated value of $ 458,000. Even without the Austin Energy easement, Whellan says the proposed park would meet the city’s requirements.

But according to the department, the proposed Koenig Button Park on the west side of the property is too small at 0.17 acres. However, Whellan points out that the park is larger than the Mustang Button Park (6096 Guadalupe), which is only 0.13 acre. The ministry is proposing to consolidate the two button parks, which would eliminate both affordable housing and market-priced housing.

Several neighbors present at the meeting asked council to dismiss the appeal. Dana Markus-Wolf criticized the developer’s proposal for a cycle path along Koenig and also rejected the idea of ​​dividing the parks. Tommy Larson, who said he lives near the proposed development, pointed out that the nearest park, Shipe Park, is quite a distance from the area. He urged members of the parks council to dismiss the appeal, appearing to assume the developer would develop the property in accordance with the recommendations of the parks department. Brian Bedrosian, vice president of the North Loop ATX Neighborhood Association, said 60% of his group voted against the call in a recent meeting.

The Austin MonitorThe work of is made possible by donations from the community. While our reports cover donors from time to time, we make sure to separate commercial and editorial efforts while maintaining transparency. A full list of donors is available here, and our code of ethics is explained here.

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Aimco’s Flamingo Tower plans rejected by Miami Beach board of directors https://avvensanchea.com/aimcos-flamingo-tower-plans-rejected-by-miami-beach-board-of-directors/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 17:32:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/aimcos-flamingo-tower-plans-rejected-by-miami-beach-board-of-directors/ AIMCO CEO Terry Considine and a render of the Grand Flamingo Tower Aimco’s plans for a luxury condo tower in South Beach were rejected by a Miami Beach board of directors on Friday. The design review committee rejected the Real Estate Investment Trust’s request to build The Grand Flamingo, which would mark the fourth tower […]]]>

AIMCO CEO Terry Considine and a render of the Grand Flamingo Tower

Aimco’s plans for a luxury condo tower in South Beach were rejected by a Miami Beach board of directors on Friday.

The design review committee rejected the Real Estate Investment Trust’s request to build The Grand Flamingo, which would mark the fourth tower of the 16-acre Flamingo South Beach complex, with six members voting against and one voting for. The vote came after several South Beach residents urged the board to reject or sue it, and after a board member called Aimco a “bad corporate citizen.”

Among those speaking out against The Grand Flamingo are owners in the Flamingo Community South Tower, a 15-story, 562-unit building on the south side that was partially converted to condominiums in the mid-2000s.

In addition to concerns about the potential impact of the project on traffic, the owners of Flamingo’s south tower told the board that Aimco never delivered on the improvements promised, failed to maintain the tower. south or prevent frequent flooding of its parking lot and did not provide adequate security or services. Residents have also complained that Aimco is suing the South Tower Condominium Association.

“Aimco hasn’t met us. They took the time to meet WavNA [West Avenue Neighborhood Association], but not the owners who actually live on the site itself, ”said Jason Savitz, a 15-year-old resident of Flamingo Tower South. “Even worse than that, Aimco filed a lawsuit which is now pending before the judge [Michael] Hanzman.

David Weissman, an owner of the South Tower unit, said Aimco’s actions were in direct contradiction to the design review committee’s instructions to meet with the neighbors when it continued early application. August.

“It’s the complete opposite of working with the community – twisting their arms until you hear a snap,” Weissman said.

Residents of The Capri, a seven-story, 69-unit condo at 1445 16th Street, were also opposed to The Grand Flamingo due to the proposed building’s 140-foot height and its potential impact on traffic on the road to two bay lanes. Louis Costanzo, a resident of Capri, noted that the Grand Flamingo will be within 10 meters of his building and that Aimco has only made two phone calls to the Capri association.

“We have a lot of concerns that need to be resolved,” Costanzo said.

Aimco’s attorney Michael Larkin pointed out that city planning staff analyzed the tower plans and found them to comply with the city’s zoning code. Larkin said the tower is the fifth phase of a redevelopment plan that aims to transform Flamingo South Beach from a party community to a family-friendly pedestrian complex. The Grand Flamingo’s units would be larger and more family-friendly, Larkin said.

Similar renovation efforts at the central and north towers of Flamingo will also reduce the total number of units at the Flamingo complex, which has 1,679 units, by 206 units, Larkin added.

Additionally, Larkin said WAvNA and the Belle Plaza Condominium Association are now supporting Aimco’s application. WAvNA’s opposition ended after Aimco pledged not to pursue any zoning deviations, to clean up the public bay promenade twice a day, and to close the new tower roof terrace after sunset. from the sun.

Current conditions at the South Tower

Current conditions at the South Tower

Belle Plaza’s support came after Aimco pledged to provide this association with “window washes, balcony cleanings, car washes, pool filters and legal fees” after the board’s approval. ‘design review, according to a letter from Larkin to the board.

As for the Flamingo South Tower, Larkin said he could not meet with them because “we are in a dispute with the organization of the South Tower and legal counsel advised us not to meet with the residents of the South Tower. “. Larkin insisted the DRB should not be deterred by what is essentially a private legal dispute over what it claims is the South Tower residents’ refusal to pay their fair share of special dues.

Savitz denounced the special assessment argument as a “red herring” and that he himself paid all the special assessments ever collected. “This is not a special contribution. What it is about is that we are not heard, ”said Savitz.

According to Aimco’s lawsuit against the Flamingo / South Beach I Condo association, Aimco owns 222 units in the South Tower, while third party owners of individual units own 340 residences. Aimco paid $ 53.6 million for his game of Flamingo South Beach in 1997.

Aimco alleges that the condominium association was obligated under the Flamingo’s Reciprocal Maintenance, Use and Easement (REA) agreement to pay $ 7 million for improvements in the common areas of the community and of cooperate with the developer’s quest to get his “revised plans,” including the city-approved 14-story Tower.

Instead, according to the lawsuit, the South Tower Association agreed to pay $ 5.7 million “under protest” and withheld consent for the revised site plan. The lawsuit alleges that because the association violated the terms of the REA agreement, Aimco suffered $ 3 million in damages.

Board member Sam Sheldon, who suggested pursuing the request, said he believed Aimco was using his “position to abuse South Tower residents.”

“On no other candidacy in my two and a half years on the board, I haven’t had as many aggrieved people as on this candidacy, and it’s not because of idiosyncrasies, it’s because that Aimco is a bad corporate citizen, ”Sheldon mentioned. “… Aimco acts with contempt for his neighbors and, frankly, this advice because the directive was to go talk to the members of the South Tower and, instead, Aimco is suing the South Tower Condominium Association for force their consent to this request. “

Board member Sarah Giller Nelson was in favor of rejecting the proposal. She said there were “fundamental problems with what is being proposed”.

Larkin, Aimco’s attorney, said a denial would be “pretty harsh” and “of no use.” He suggests continuing the point until November.

Jason Hagopian cast the only dissenting vote in favor of the proposal.

Aimco, a Denver-based publicly traded REIT, has had other recent disputes at other properties. In Miami’s Edgewater community, he canceled the leases of all of its residents at Hamilton Bayfront on the Bay Tower while renovating the building. Some tenants are staying, but they are expected to move this month.

The company has also developed land around Hamilton in recent months.


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Park with troubled past and major improvement https://avvensanchea.com/park-with-troubled-past-and-major-improvement/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 01:10:11 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/park-with-troubled-past-and-major-improvement/ TUCSON (KVOA) – After years of complaints from neighbors, a city park just north of downtown is undergoing a major turnaround. Anza Park is located on the corner of Speedway and Stone, at the entrance to downtown, Pima College and the University of Arizona. Over the years, the park has earned a reputation as a […]]]>

TUCSON (KVOA) – After years of complaints from neighbors, a city park just north of downtown is undergoing a major turnaround.

Anza Park is located on the corner of Speedway and Stone, at the entrance to downtown, Pima College and the University of Arizona.

Over the years, the park has earned a reputation as a hotspot for drug traffickers and the homeless.

This is all starting to change.

For residents of the neighborhoods around Anza Park, the past few years have been frustrating.

The playground and other areas had been overrun by drug dealers, and the park had simply become unsafe.

“No one really took ownership of the park, and the neighborhood really needed to have someone other than criminals here,” said Judy Sensibar, president of the West University Neighborhood Association.

As neighbors grew increasingly concerned about the park’s problems, Tucson police began to focus their efforts on eliminating criminal elements, including people selling methamphetamine and other drugs.

Officers from TPD’s Park Mental Health and Safety Support Teams also focused on turning things around.

“We offered homeless outreach assistance. We also offered substance abuse resources, so we don’t just kick them out of the park,” Tucson Police Lt. Belinda Morales told the Digging team. Deeper. “We also give them what they need to be successful.

Construction of a dog park began in March under Proposal 407, and this $ 180,000 project is now complete.

The city will also build new toilets to replace damaged ones, and it is also working to find additional funds for new Ramadas.

“A lot of the improvements are about safety and security; then our side for the parks department, ”said Tom Fisher, project manager with the Tucson Parks and Recreation Department. “Our goal is to activate the park and take it back from the troublemakers.”

Tucson Police say things are improving a lot in Anza Park and the most serious crime in the area has declined since officers stepped up their enforcement.

The TPD also credits community involvement in helping to make the park safe for everyone.

“It’s contagious, and having this park available to neighborhood residents brings a different quality of life. said Lieutenant Morales.

The grand opening of the new dog park is set for this Friday, September 10 at 11 a.m.


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Long Beach group chooses new neighborhood name to honor Tongva tribe • Long Beach Post News https://avvensanchea.com/long-beach-group-chooses-new-neighborhood-name-to-honor-tongva-tribe-long-beach-post-news/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 22:16:24 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/long-beach-group-chooses-new-neighborhood-name-to-honor-tongva-tribe-long-beach-post-news/ Standing outside a liquor store near the intersection of Cherry Avenue and 64th Street in North Long Beach, Jeff Rowe and Virginia Carmelo examine two patches of uncut grass and weeds growing near the sidewalk as the hot August sun shines on them. The patches are only a few feet long horizontally and even shorter […]]]>

Standing outside a liquor store near the intersection of Cherry Avenue and 64th Street in North Long Beach, Jeff Rowe and Virginia Carmelo examine two patches of uncut grass and weeds growing near the sidewalk as the hot August sun shines on them.

The patches are only a few feet long horizontally and even shorter vertically. A parking sign stands askew from the ground.

Not much at first glance, but the couple are optimistic that the grass patches will eventually be turned into ceremonial gardens filled with plants and herbs essential to the indigenous Tongva tribe that predominated in the area. almost 10,000 years ago.

But this isn’t the first time Rowe and Carmelo have worked together to honor the Tongva people.

Neighboring residents of the former Grant Neighborhood Association, named after the neighborhood Ulysses S. Grant Primary School, voted this year to change its name to Nehyam Neighborhood Association— “nehyam” which means “my friend” in the Tongva language. .

The name change also comes as Long Beach prepares to redraw its municipal district boundaries. Long Beach Deputy City Manager Kevin Jackson said the city intends to fully recognize the neighborhood’s new name on an updated map of city neighborhoods. The map will be updated after September 8.

Rowe, president of the new Nehyam Neighborhood Association, hopes to plant sage, chia, yerba manso, three-leaf sumac and wild California grapes in the proposed garden in the fall. It will also feature a plaque on the wall of the liquor store that will educate passers-by about Tongva’s history.

He said there was no need for a building permit from the city, just approval from the owner of the liquor store who has already given him permission to create the garden.

Rowe motioned to Carmelo, who is a descendant of the Tongva tribe. “His ancestors figured out how to shelter it, what to eat and which to make medicine,” he said.


“friends”


Grant’s presidency in the late 1800s attempted to juggle western expansion with peace between the federal government and Indigenous peoples.

Policies to assimilate the tribes into Western culture were adopted, which proved catastrophic for the tribes.

The old name of the neighborhood was something Rowe and other members of the neighborhood organization felt they could no longer support, and it was Carmelo’s knowledge of the culture of his ancestors that guided their plan to change the neighborhood. name.

“As a Native American, in our cultures it’s always a protocol to recognize the original people of the land, and now we’re extending it here to other cultures,” Carmelo said. “It’s just a matter of respect, just basic respect.”

The Tongva, also known as the Gabrielino-Tongva, are a primarily nomadic gathering tribe who originally settled throughout the Los Angeles Basin, including parts of Signal Hill and Long Beach, before the European settlers do not settle and begin to urbanize the area.

Very little history surrounding the Tongva has been officially recorded in relation to more well-known tribes. The lack of records made any effort to obtain federal recognition, medical and financial support almost impossible.

Among the lack of cultural documents, there is also no official alphabet for the Tongva language, and many linguists and cultural consultants, such as Carmelo, have had to develop one over time.

The history of the Tongva people lives on through monuments and tribe descendants like Carmelo, who speaks the native language.

Territories in the Los Angeles area where the Tongva Native American tribe originally settled. Photographic illustration by Candice Wong. Source: Long Beach Cultural Assessment 2017, Cogstone Resource Management.

The founding of the Grant Neighborhood Association dates back to 1974. However, Rowe believes it could have been created a few years earlier.

The association has established a clubhouse in the old Long Beach 12 Fire Station in the heart of the neighborhood at 6509 Gundry Ave. The group organized weekly crop exchanges to provide residents with healthy food and held meetings outside the fire station.

Grant Elementary School was built in 1935 and more buildings were added in 1949 and 1955.

In 2019, Long Beach officially recognized the Grant District as a Historic District, the first in North Long Beach, to preserve the old suburban homes that were built there in the 1930s.

To earn this recognition, Rowe said the neighborhood association needed to sort through multiple files to provide planners with evidence to support the neighborhood’s historical significance.

Sorting through the records, Rowe said the association discovered that homes in the neighborhood were originally only sold to white families, highlighting a redlining story and the discrimination that has affected some communities in Long Beach for generations.

“It was painful to find out. That it was our legacy, ”Rowe said.

The group debated for months what the name should become. Meanwhile, Rowe saw an opportunity to name the Neighborhood Association after something that would pay homage to the tribes who lived in the area as there were very few monuments dedicated to them.

Jeff Rowe, left, and Virginia Carmelo discuss the creation of a native plant garden in North Long Beach on Wednesday, August 25, 2021. Photo by Sebastian Echeverry.

Rowe contacted the Gabrielino-Tongva Indian Tribe Council’s Los Angeles office about the name change idea they approved.

The council helped him get in touch with tribal members in the Long Beach area, eventually reaching Carmelo’s son, who told him his mother had experience in cultural counseling.

“We just wanted to observe and recognize the first people here. That was our real reasoning, ”Rowe said. “In particular, our conversation started after George Floyd. It just seemed like we couldn’t ignore Grant’s legacy. “

At first, not everyone in the neighborhood association agreed with the name change.

Rowe said some members have argued that Grant is part of the nation’s history and should be preserved. Rowe responded by saying there was no record of Grant setting foot in North Long Beach, which he said helped win over those who remained hesitant.

Efforts to address the history of the indigenous peoples of Long Beach are not a new concept.

In a similar case to the Rowe Neighborhood Association, Cal State Long Beach made the decision in 2018 to remove the school mascot Prospector Pete and change her to a shark.

The controversial decision was made amid growing concerns from students and activists alike that the historical accounts of violence against Indigenous tribes by gold diggers during the state’s gold rush were something that the school should not celebrate.

A year later, the school had to contend with the construction of a student accommodation center in which teams moved dirt and debris to a nearby plot of land called Puvungna which is sacred to the Tongva. The incident led to discussions in the courtroom about the protection of sacred lands.

Carmelo believes the push for tribal recognition is something that should have happened a long time ago, but the actions taken by Rowe and the diverse community of North Long Beach are welcome.

“It is always an honor for anyone to recognize our elders and ancestors,” said Carmelo. “But when we see other cultures spreading it, this recognition is of great importance.”


“all my relatives”



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Our House Callaway Executive Director Receives Fellowship https://avvensanchea.com/our-house-callaway-executive-director-receives-fellowship/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 05:11:36 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/our-house-callaway-executive-director-receives-fellowship/ Our House Callaway Executive Director Misty Dothage received a full scholarship for the Neighborhood Leadership Academy (NLA) program through MU Extension, which normally costs $ 325. Neighborhood Leadership Academy helps develop personal leadership skills while providing in-depth training that emphasizes community development strategies, project planning, organizational leadership, and management practices. The program lasts 10 weeks […]]]>

Our House Callaway Executive Director Misty Dothage received a full scholarship for the Neighborhood Leadership Academy (NLA) program through MU Extension, which normally costs $ 325.

Neighborhood Leadership Academy helps develop personal leadership skills while providing in-depth training that emphasizes community development strategies, project planning, organizational leadership, and management practices.

The program lasts 10 weeks and includes 30 hours of learning and interactions that will help participants hone their leadership skills while gaining practical knowledge to put their goals into action. Topics for the session include: community building, project planning, funding and resource development as well as a community improvement project. Each participant will be invited to carry out a project, ranging from a neighborhood association to the planning and implementation of a community garden, including a neighborhood park or a youth program.

This year’s fall program will be offered statewide in a virtual format, with smaller regional cohorts to allow for discussions and local applications of program content. All participants who complete the program will receive a St. Louis University of Missouri Chancellor’s Certificate in Neighborhood Leadership. Additionally, a grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health to enhance leadership development in Missouri was used to provide scholarships to participants statewide.

The scholarships were awarded based on the following objectives:

The participant will be able to successfully complete NLA and its community project

NLA investment in selected beneficiaries will catalyze community improvement

NLA will reflect the diversity of the region

NLA scholarships will increase opportunities


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