Neighborhood Association – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:51:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://avvensanchea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6.png Neighborhood Association – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ 32 32 The battle against San Francisco high school football fires rages on https://avvensanchea.com/the-battle-against-san-francisco-high-school-football-fires-rages-on/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:51:01 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/the-battle-against-san-francisco-high-school-football-fires-rages-on/ English Although the JB Murphy field lights of St. Ignatius brought night football to the school’s Sunset District campus this seasonlegal battles with neighbors are not yet over. The SI Neighborhood Association sent out a press release Monday afternoon claiming victory in a years-long battle to have the lights reviewed for their environmental impacts on […]]]>

English

Although the JB Murphy field lights of St. Ignatius brought night football to the school’s Sunset District campus this seasonlegal battles with neighbors are not yet over.

The SI Neighborhood Association sent out a press release Monday afternoon claiming victory in a years-long battle to have the lights reviewed for their environmental impacts on the neighborhood.

The California State Court of Appeals sided with neighbors, who argued the lights were not exempt from review under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). Both the school and the San Francisco Planning Commission claimed otherwise. The San Francisco Superior Court had previously sided with the school and the Planning Commission.

The court ruled that the lasting impacts of the luminaires on the neighborhood must be analyzed under the CEQA regulations, which could lead to further measures to reduce the impact of the luminaires.

The court also said that since the 90-foot-tall lights are significantly taller than other structures in the surrounding neighborhood, they cannot be classified as small non-impact structures.

“We are extremely pleased that the Court of Appeals has recognized our valid position expressed by our attorney, Michael W. Graf, during the recent hearing,” neighborhood association secretary Deborah Brown said in the statement. . “A full CEQA review is the outcome we were hoping for.”

Jen Kwart, spokeswoman for City Attorney David Chiu, said, “We are disappointed with the outcome and are evaluating potential next steps.”

St. Ignatius fans try to rally their team in a 17-7 loss to the Jesuits in San Francisco on September 2, 2022. | Chris Victorio for The Standard

The stadium has hosted five regular season games and two playoff games for the Wildcats college football team, including last Friday’s 28-14 win over Aptos to advance to the Central Coast Section (CCS) Division II Championship Game.

The lights have also provided larger windows for practice times for SI’s football and field hockey teams throughout the fall season, and will continue to present those opportunities for the school’s away teams. throughout winter and spring. Before the lights were installed, teams often had to compete for practice times on crowded fields, the school said.

See also


Practice and play times have been an issue at many schools in San Francisco, lacking in lighting.

Last week’s Academic Athletic Association (AAA) football semifinals kicked off at 1:30 p.m. on a Thursday, while students were still in class.

Practice hours at unlit schools are drastically reduced during the winter months, with San Francisco students in class until at least 3:40 p.m. due to Senate Bill 328, which prohibited schools from starting classes before 8:30 a.m.

Crowds within JB Murphy Field have had no security issues this season, although neighbors have set off fireworks twice, once immediately after a win over Palo Alto on August 26 and during the third quarter of Friday’s playoff win over Aptos.

English

]]>
FYI: Sumter Christian Golfers’ Association meets every Tuesday https://avvensanchea.com/fyi-sumter-christian-golfers-association-meets-every-tuesday/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/fyi-sumter-christian-golfers-association-meets-every-tuesday/ EDITOR’S NOTE: Please note that due to the threat of COVID-19, some of the following events may be canceled or postponed unexpectedly. The Christian Golfers Association (CGA) meets at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for Bible study. The group meets at the CGA’s office in Dillon Park. Complimentary refreshments and golf after Bible study. Dial (803) […]]]>

EDITOR’S NOTE: Please note that due to the threat of COVID-19, some of the following events may be canceled or postponed unexpectedly.

The Christian Golfers Association (CGA) meets at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for Bible study. The group meets at the CGA’s office in Dillon Park. Complimentary refreshments and golf after Bible study. Dial (803) 773-2171.

Ballard-Palmer-Bates American Legion Post 202 meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Post, 310 Palmetto St. All veterans are welcome to attend. Dial (803) 773-4811.

Sumter James R. Clark Sickle Cell Memorial Foundation, 337 Manning Ave., offers free sickle cell and sickle cell trait screenings to the communities of Sumter and Clarendon. For appointments, call (803) 774-6181.

The Westside Neighborhood Association meets at 5:30 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Birnie HOPE Center, 210 S. Purdy St.



U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 12-1 meets at 7 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Summerton Fire Station, North Cantey Street, Summerton. Membership is open to any US citizen 17 years of age or older. Prior Coast Guard service is not required. The primary purpose of the Auxiliary is to promote safe boating on Lake Marion and Lake Moultrie by providing safe boating courses, courtesy vessel checks for required safety equipment and patrols on lakes offering help to anyone in need. The Auxiliary is also ready to assist the USCG in its search and rescue mission. We encourage anyone interested in participating in our mission to attend a meeting and learn more about the auxiliary.

The Temple Sinai Jewish History Center is looking for docents (tour guides). Guides must be 18 years or older and willing to undergo training before starting. This is a voluntary position and you will be asked to commit at least a few hours per month (Thursday or Friday afternoon or Saturday morning). The museum will work with students who wish to arrange class credit through their college. The Center covers South Carolina and Sumter’s Jewish history, the Holocaust, and Sumter’s ties to the Holocaust. Guides should be friendly and comfortable with children and adults. Contact Diana Roof at (803) 468-8630 or droof@sumtercountymuseum.org or Annie Rivers at (803) 775-0908 or arivers@sumtercountymuseum.org.

Lac Marion Poste VFW 11078, Summerton, meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 1 Duke St., Summerton, behind First Citizens Bank. Dinner starts at 6:30 p.m. and the meeting starts at 7 p.m. All VFW members are encouraged to attend. Call Carl A. Farley at (803) 460-8910.

Kappa Alpha Psi Brotherhood Bishopville/Manning/Shaw AFB Alumni Chapter meets at 10 a.m. the first Saturday of each month at the Jeffrey Lampkins Bistro, 106 Main St., Sumter. Call Dr. James Munford at (803)-795-2903.

The National Kidney Foundation of South Carolina needs junk vehicles, even ones that don’t work. The car will be towed free of charge and you will benefit from a possible tax deduction. The donated vehicle will be auctioned off or recycled for salvageable parts. Call (800) 488-2277.

The Muscular Dystrophy Family Foundation Inc. (MDFF), a non-profit organization, accepts vehicle contributions. To make a vehicle donation, call (800) 544-1213 or log on to the website at www.mdff.org and click on the automobile icon to complete a vehicle donation request. line.

Take part in the Double Dutch Fun Day Thursdays for adults at the South HOPE Center, 1125 S. Lafayette Drive, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. every Thursday. Adults 30 and over are welcome to come play games, hula hoop, double Dutch, hopscotch, dancing and more.

The Sumter Ballroom Dance Club meets 7-9 p.m. every Wednesday at the Sumter County Parks and Recreation Department, 155 Haynsworth Street. Beginners are welcome. Classes are $10 per lesson and are held in the Carolina Room. Registration is not required. For more information, call (803) 968-4760.



Sumter Senior Services and Sumter’s Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) Seek Volunteers to support the missions of non-profit organizations in Sumter County. RSVP connects the talents and skills of people 55 and older with nonprofits, community organizations and agencies looking for volunteers. Sumter’s RSVP has ongoing partnerships and volunteer opportunities available with Christian Charities of Sumter, Community Juvenile Arbitration, National Federation of the Blind: Sumter Chapter, Sumter Senior Services (Meals on Wheels), Prisma Health Tuomey Hospital and Hospice, United Ministries of Sumter and the Veterans Administration Community Outpatient Clinic. Volunteer opportunities include delivering meals, sorting non-perishable food donations, mentoring youth, administrative tasks and more. RSVP volunteers can make a difference by investing a few hours a week. If you are 55 or older, a Sumter County resident and would like more information, contact Rebecca Sears at (803) 773-5508 or rsears@sumterseniorservices.org.

The Sumter Coin Club meets from 7-8 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at the Patriot Park Pavilion. All ages are welcome. Join us to learn more about coins and currencies. We have a door prize, a raffle and an auction at each meeting.

Seniors in Motion Program, offered by Paxville Community Development Corp., takes place from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Wednesday. The program offers a variety of personal skill sets, including technology skills, senior life skills development, bingo and other games, a health and wellness workshop, and a Bible study. Programs operate on the Clarendon School District 2 schedule. For more information, call (803) 452-5124 or email paxvillecdc99@gmail.com.

Santee-Wateree Regional Transportation Authority (SWRTA) offers free rides to COVID-19 vaccines and COVID-19 testing sites. Contact SWRTA from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at (803) 934-0396.

The Sumter Newcomers’ Club welcomes residents at our coffees with guest speakers on the second Friday of each month and our lunches on the fourth Friday of each month at a local restaurant. The club also offers various card games and other games and a book club. If you’re looking for friends or just something to do, come check out the Sumter Newcomers’ Club. Call Shelly at (803) 968-0024 for more information.

General George L. Mabry Jr. Military Order of the Purple Heart Chapter 817 meets at 6 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month at the Combat Veteran Building, 529 N. Wise Drive, Sumter, SC 29153. The meetings are held to foster an environment of goodwill and camaraderie among veterans injured in combat as well as to promote patriotism, help find information and resources, and provide services to all veterans and their families. For more information, visit purpleheart817sumtersc.com or call (803) 983-3770.

The “Republican” meetings of the GOP are held at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at the Restaurant at Second Mill (the Quality Inn restaurant), 2390 Broad St., across from the Golden Corral. Meetings are open to anyone 16 years of age or older. For more information and questions, call (803) 972-4555.

Marine Corps League Detachment 1202 meets at 6 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at VFW, 1925 Gion St. All Marines present and past are welcome. Dial (803) 972-4555.



American Legion Post 15 meets at 6:30 p.m. on the first Monday of each month at 34 S. Artillery Drive. All veterans, past and present, are welcome. Dial (803) 968-5115.

The Sumter County Recreation Department offers after-school programs 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. for $5 per week per participant at the following locations: Catchall-Shaw Community Center, Cherryvale Community Center, DeLaine Community Center, Eastern Community Center, Ebenezer Community Center, Rembert/Rafting Creek Community Center, Salterstown Center Shiloh Community and Community Center. Call (803) 436-2248 for more information.

The Sumter Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol meets from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. every Tuesday at 2945 Airport Road. There are cadet programs, aerospace education programs, and emergency service programs. Call Lt. Col. George Stanley at (803) 847-7640. Visit www.gocivilairpatrol.com for information.

Connected Warriors Inc. offers evidence-based, trauma-aware yoga therapy for military members, veterans, and their families toll-free for participants at 5 p.m. Wednesdays at Shaw Air Force Base for those with base access and 5 p.m. Fridays at Southern Bliss Yoga, 600 Bultman Drive, Number 4. Call Melissa at (803) 468-1658 , email southernblissyoga@yahoo.com or visit www.connectedwarriors.org for more details.

]]>
Neighbors say abandoned building in Wahouma neighborhood is becoming a safety concern https://avvensanchea.com/neighbors-say-abandoned-building-in-wahouma-neighborhood-is-becoming-a-safety-concern/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 04:43:52 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/neighbors-say-abandoned-building-in-wahouma-neighborhood-is-becoming-a-safety-concern/ BIRMINGHAM, Alabama (WIAT) — A Birmingham woman thinks an abandoned building in her neighborhood is becoming a hotspot for litter and crime. After several failed attempts to get help from the city and the police, she decided to call CBS 42’s Your Voice, Your Station team to find out what’s stopping city leaders from fixing […]]]>

BIRMINGHAM, Alabama (WIAT) — A Birmingham woman thinks an abandoned building in her neighborhood is becoming a hotspot for litter and crime.

After several failed attempts to get help from the city and the police, she decided to call CBS 42’s Your Voice, Your Station team to find out what’s stopping city leaders from fixing it.

The Consult America Health and Rehab building is on the corner of 71st Place North and 1st Avenue North in the Wahouma area.

“It’s sad. It’s really sad and no one should have to live like this,” said Dr Annette Smith.

Dr. Annette Smith moved to the neighborhood a year ago from Florida.

“I have family members who want to come visit but I don’t recommend it,” Smith said.

The abandoned assisted living home has been vacant for years and neighbors said it has become a hotspot for crime and litter.

“Wherever you go in Birmingham you see a lot of empty buildings, a lot of vacant buildings and for me that’s the cause of a lot of crime in the area,” Smith said.

She wanted to live closer to her children and grandchildren, but she didn’t expect to live next door.

“There are a lot of homeless people in the neighborhood, there are a lot of prostitutes in the neighborhood and they walk around all day and all night,” Smith said.

Smith said over the past year she has made several calls to city leaders.

“I contacted the mayor’s office; I have contacted the city countless times to no avail,” Smith said.

CBS 42’s Carly Laing did some research to find out what can be done. The property is privately owned, so the city is not responsible for its upkeep or demolition. She contacted District 5 Councilman Darrell O’Quinn and he said the city was working to resolve the issue.

“We are certainly aware of that. Code enforcement action has been taken on this property,” O’Quinn said.

According to O’Quinn, state laws make it very difficult to deal with private property situations like this. He said the city needed to find and notify the owner of the safety issues. The owner then has the opportunity to remedy the problem.

If the owner does not take action, the case can be taken to court. O’Quinn said the landlord usually has another chance to fix the problem before the court makes a final decision. However, the process must restart if the building changes ownership.

According to tax documents, property taxes for the land have been paid by at least four different entities over the past 10 years

“Alabama is a strong state when it comes to property rights. The preference in the laws here is to give property owners a lot of protections,” O’Quinn said.

O’Quinn said he is committed to making this area cleaner and safer.

“We don’t want the burn to exist anywhere. We helped make investments in the Wahouma neighborhood where this property is located. We’re trying to take steps to address this issue, but again, Alabama is a strong state when it comes to property rights,” O’Quinn said.

After our interviews, a fire broke out in the building earlier this week and spread to a neighboring house.

Wahouma Neighborhood Association President Robert Walker said the property was becoming a serious issue for the neighborhood.

“Not only is the building on fire, but it has set fire to the neighboring house and damaged two other houses. It’s something the city needs to take seriously,” Walker said.

Walker said it’s not the first time a fire has broken out. He said fires in abandoned buildings in this area happen far too often.

We were able to locate the last known owner of this property. Laing has contacted them but has yet to hear back.

Stick with CBS 42 as this story develops.

]]>
What to know, how to vote https://avvensanchea.com/what-to-know-how-to-vote/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 15:31:21 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/what-to-know-how-to-vote/ Election Day will decide Florida’s next governor, its next US senator and several congressional seats. Here’s a breakdown of all the WESH 2 election coverage, where and how to vote, and what’s on your ballot. As voters head to the polls and see new and familiar names on the ballots, it is essential to be […]]]>

Election Day will decide Florida’s next governor, its next US senator and several congressional seats. Here’s a breakdown of all the WESH 2 election coverage, where and how to vote, and what’s on your ballot. As voters head to the polls and see new and familiar names on the ballots, it is essential to be informed of the main issues and where the candidates stand. Check out the WESH 2 general election guide in Florida and our overview of the main races. When is election day? What time do the polls open? The general election takes place on Tuesday 8 November. Polling stations are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. How to vote? Vote by mail: The deadline for requesting a vote by mail was the 10th day before the election. The Office of the Election Supervisor must receive your absentee ballot no later than 7:00 p.m. on Election Day for it to be counted. Early voting in Flagler, Volusia, Seminole and Brevard counties has already ended. Voting in person on Election Day: To find your polling place, simply use the state’s voter information portal. Related: Florida General Election Guide Related: Where to find Florida voting resources, election information What do I need to bring to vote? You’ll need to bring a valid ID such as a driver’s license or passport. Other acceptable identification includes: debit or credit card military ID student card retirement center ID neighborhood association ID public assistance card health ID veteran’s license issued by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Permit to carry a weapon or concealed firearm, or employee identification card issued by the federal government, the state of Florida, or any county or municipality When the election results are in -they? WESH 2 will have all of your election results on Tuesday night. The results should start coming in around 8 p.m. Statewide races. DeSantis has led a strongly conservative agenda, often attacking President Joe Biden’s administration on immigration and other issues. Crist has been a strong supporter of the President and has made restoring abortion rights in Florida a top campaign priority. Related: Here’s What The 3 Amendments Would Do On The Florida Ballot In The United States. Senate Republican Sen. Marco Rubio for two terms is challenged by Democratic Congresswoman Val Demings, Orlando’s former police chief. Rubio previously ran for president in 2016, dropping out to seek re-election to the Senate, which he did easily. But Demings, a House prosecutor during then-President Donald Trump’s first impeachment, showed a skill at fundraising, raising millions more than Rubio. Florida Attorney General, Republican incumbent Ashley Moody, is challenged by Democratic primary winner Aramis Ayala. Ayala is the former District Attorney for Circuit Nine (Orange and Osceola Counties), who made headlines in 2017 when she decided not to seek the death penalty under any circumstances. Then-Governor. Rick Scott stripped her of several dozen murder cases and assigned them to a nearby state attorney. When Ayala sued Scott, she lost. She said she would follow and uphold the law, even in capital murder cases. Moody has spent a lot of time helping support DeSantis’ conservative agenda by filing lawsuits when he signs controversial bills and then they are challenged in court. Commitment 2022: WESH 2 mini-debates What else do I need to know? Central Florida county officials did not announce any polling place closures due to approaching Subtropical Storm Nicole. Weather conditions make it safe for people to vote in person on election day, although officials are also urging people to spend Tuesday preparing for the storm. in the Fort Myers area, although voting restrictions have been eased for affected residents. The area represents about 7% of voters statewide. Where Florida has historically been evenly split between Democrats and GOP, polls this cycle tend to favor GOP candidates in statewide elections. The Interstate 4 corridor between Volusia and Hillsborough Counties will be important to watch during early returns, as this series of counties is demographically and politically representative of the state. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Election Day will decide Florida’s next governor, its next US senator and several congressional seats. Here’s a breakdown of all the WESH 2 election coverage, where and how to vote, and what’s on your ballot.

As voters head to the polls and see new and familiar names on the ballots, it is essential to be informed of the main issues and where the candidates stand. Check Florida WESH 2 General Election Guide and our overview of key races.

When is election day? What time do the polls open?

The general election takes place on Tuesday, November 8. Polling stations are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

How to vote?

  • Vote by mail: The deadline for requesting a postal vote was the 10th day before the election. The Office of the Election Supervisor must receive your absentee ballot by 7:00 p.m. on election day for it to count.
  • Early voting in person: Sunday evening, the last advance votes were sunk in Orange and Osceola counties. Early voting in Flagler, Volusia, Seminole and Brevard counties has already ended.
  • Voting in person on election day: To find the polling station assigned to you, simply use the voter information portal.

Related: Florida General Election Guide

Related: Where to find Florida voting resources, election information

What should I bring to vote?

You will need to bring a valid ID such as a driver’s license or passport.

Other acceptable forms of identification include:

  • debit or credit card
  • military ID card
  • Student card
  • retirement center ID
  • neighborhood association identifier
  • public assistance ID card
  • Veterans Health ID issued by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Concealed weapon or firearm license
  • or an employee identification card issued by the federal government, the state of Florida or any county or municipality

When do the election results come in?

WESH 2 will have all of your election results on Tuesday night. The results should start coming in around 8 p.m.

Statewide races

Governor

This is a matchup between Republican Governor Ron DeSantis and former Republican Governor and, more recently, former St. Petersburg Congressman Charlie Crist. DeSantis has led a strongly conservative agenda, often attacking President Joe Biden’s administration on immigration and other issues. Crist has been a strong supporter of the President and has made restoring abortion rights in Florida a top campaign priority.

Related: Here’s what the 3 amendments would do on the Florida ballot

US Senate

Two-term Republican Senator Marco Rubio is challenged by Democratic Congresswoman Val Demings, Orlando’s former police chief. Rubio previously ran for president in 2016, dropping out to seek re-election to the Senate, which he did easily. But Demings, a House prosecutor during then-President Donald Trump’s first impeachment, showed a skill at fundraising, raising millions more than Rubio.

Florida Attorney General

Republican incumbent Ashley Moody is challenged by Democratic primary winner Aramis Ayala. Ayala is the former District Attorney for Circuit Nine (Orange and Osceola Counties), who made headlines in 2017 when she decided not to seek the death penalty under any circumstances. Then-Governor. Rick Scott stripped her of several dozen murder cases and assigned them to a nearby state attorney. When Ayala sued Scott, she lost. She said she would follow and uphold the law, even in capital murder cases. Moody has spent a lot of time helping support DeSantis’ conservative agenda by filing lawsuits when he signs controversial bills and then they are challenged in court.

Commitment 2022: WESH 2 mini debates

What else should I know?

Central Florida county officials have not announced any polling place closures due to the approach subtropical storm Nicole. Weather conditions make it safe for people to vote in person on election day, although officials are also urging people to spend Tuesday preparing for the storm.

Related: Watches issued for Central Florida as Subtropical Storm Nicole approaches

The arrival and devastation of Hurricane Ian will undoubtedly slow voting processes in the Fort Myers area, although voting restrictions have been eased for affected residents. The area represents about 7% of voters statewide.

Where Florida has historically been evenly split between Democrats and GOP, polls this cycle tend to favor GOP candidates for statewide office. The Interstate 4 corridor between Volusia and Hillsborough Counties will be important to watch during early returns, as this series of counties is demographically and politically representative of the state.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

]]>
Opening of a community garden as a habitat for Columbia’s pollinators https://avvensanchea.com/opening-of-a-community-garden-as-a-habitat-for-columbias-pollinators/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 00:44:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/opening-of-a-community-garden-as-a-habitat-for-columbias-pollinators/ COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) – A pollinator garden near downtown Columbia celebrated its grand opening with a ribbon cutting at 2513 Gervais Street on Saturday. “Columbia Green usually gives money to other groups to do these kinds of projects. And we decided we wanted to try making one ourselves. And this was the result,” said Trace […]]]>

COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) – A pollinator garden near downtown Columbia celebrated its grand opening with a ribbon cutting at 2513 Gervais Street on Saturday.

“Columbia Green usually gives money to other groups to do these kinds of projects. And we decided we wanted to try making one ourselves. And this was the result,” said Trace Ballou, president of the Columbia Green 501(c)(3) nonprofit.

Ballou tells WIS that the pollinator garden was conceptualized two years ago and cost $11,000 to install in the Marvin Heller Community Garden. The grounds include a circular walkway surrounded by five informative plaques and six above-ground flowerbeds.

The project was made possible through a series of grants and a working partnership with the Lyon Street District Association (LSNA).

“It will be a place for pollinators to grow and it will help our community garden…thrive even more. It’s important projects like these that make our communities places we all want to live and be,” LSNA President Chase Toler said during Saturday’s celebration.

During the construction phase in 2021, Lyon Street neighbor Alvin “Rambo” Lemon planted a series of fruits and vegetables in the wheelchair-accessible garden bed.

“It’s rich soil here and it grows very well. I like to see things grow. Even if I don’t eat it, I love watching it grow,” said Lemon, a Korean War veteran who rode his mobility scooter at the celebration.

The LSNA also thanks the Central Carolina Realtors Association, the City of Columbia Parks and Recreation, and the Central Carolina Community Foundation for funding and other assistance.

The pollinator garden is open to the public and is not limited to the rue Lyon district.

“This garden is a true example of the kinds of collaborations Columbia Green wants to do more of. All groups are strengthened by working together to get things done for the good of the whole community,” Ballou said.

Columbia Green has operated throughout the capital since 1983. Its mission is to enhance and protect South Carolina’s natural beauty while educating the public about the environment. The non-profit organization hosts the annual Garden Festival and spearheads the Columbia Green Square Mile Project.

Columbia Green relies on community members to support its environmental operations. If you wish to join their efforts, Ballou invites you to Click here.

Notice a spelling or grammatical error in this article? Click or tap here to report it. Please include the title of the article.

Stay up to date with WIS News 10. Download the app from the Apple App Store Where Google Play Store and stream us on Roku, YouTube, Amazon Fire or Apple TV.

]]>
Election 2022: John Zaccaro Jr. on quality of life, housing and education https://avvensanchea.com/election-2022-john-zaccaro-jr-on-quality-of-life-housing-and-education/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 03:05:07 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/election-2022-john-zaccaro-jr-on-quality-of-life-housing-and-education/ By JOSE A. GIRALT JOHN ZACCARO JR., Democratic candidate for Assembly District 80 in the upcoming general election on November 8, 2022, greets a member of the public after a 2020 election town hall at Tracey Towers in the Jerome Park section of the Bronx in February 2020. Photo by José A. Giralt In the […]]]>

By JOSE A. GIRALT

JOHN ZACCARO JR., Democratic candidate for Assembly District 80 in the upcoming general election on November 8, 2022, greets a member of the public after a 2020 election town hall at Tracey Towers in the Jerome Park section of the Bronx in February 2020.
Photo by José A. Giralt

In the upcoming Nov. 8 general election, voters in Assembly District 80 will decide who best represents their interests in Albany. Running for the seat on behalf of the Democratic Party is a former AD 80 male district leader, John Zaccaro Jr., who served in the latter position from 2018 to 2020. If elected to the assembly, he will replace the member leaving the assembly, Nathalia Fernandez. , who is running as the Democratic nominee in the state Senate District 34 race.

Zaccaro Jr. was selected Sept. 7 by a Bronx Democratic Party committee as the Democratic nominee for AD 80, which includes parts of Norwood, Mosholu Parkway, Bedford Park and stretches east to include Allerton, Morris Park , Pelham Parkway, Pelham Gardens and Van Nest. As noted, state assembly districts will be redrawn ahead of the 2024 primaries.

In an interview with Norwood News, Zaccaro Jr. spoke about his three main campaign issues for the district: quality of life, housing and education. “[In] quality of life, there are a lot of problems: crime and public safety,” he said. “Addressing cleanliness in the community, sanitation and cleaning services and a host of other issues, transportation, parks and so many other things that are quality of life and are the fabric of what we want to see progress in our community.

As a housing organizer, housing is another issue Zaccaro Jr. plans to address, if elected. “We’re in a massive accessibility crisis right now,” he said. “We have more people than we have housing available for people. Those who live in housing cannot afford it. We asked Zaccaro Jr. if by housing he means rented units. We have not received a response as of the date of going to press.

For families dissatisfied with living in rental housing, Zaccaro Jr. wants them to know he sees what’s stopping them from buying a home. “We need to do everything we can to create those opportunities, not just for affordable housing, but also for affordable homeownership.”

The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), the nation’s largest public housing authority, oversees 177,569 apartments in 335 subdivisions. More than 339,900 residents depend on NYCHA for their housing needs. In AD 80, the Parkside Housing Project and Pelham Parkway Houses are NYCHA properties. In June 2022, The New York Times describes some of the dire conditions in which people lived in NYCHA housing.

“Walls and ceilings are crumbling and leaking, mold is growing in kitchens and bathrooms, elevators stop working, heat goes out in the dead of winter,” The temperature reported. The publication also reported that in more than 40% of NYCHA apartments, “residents reported three or more maintenance issues.”

Longstanding issues in public housing prompted state lawmakers to pass the Public Housing Preservation Trust bill in June, which was strongly backed by New York City Mayor Eric Adams. By law, going forward, NYCHA will raise hundreds of millions of new federal dollars a year using federal tenant protection bonds, which receive a higher per-unit subsidy than traditional state public housing bonds. section 9. This additional grant will be used by the trust to issue bonds to raise funds that NYCHA can then use to upgrade 25,000 NYCHA apartments with necessary capital improvements, as part of a pilot program.

It is this type of partnership between state and city officials that Zaccaro Jr. hopes to develop to help NYCHA residents, if elected. As chief of staff to District 17 City Council member Rafael Salamanca Jr., Zaccaro Jr. said he has become intimately aware of the intertwining of certain housing and homelessness issues between the city and the city. ‘State. “When we talk about housing, we’re not just talking about affordable housing, but we’re talking about addressing homelessness and solving issues affecting NYCHA,” he said.

“I had the pleasure of helping to work on Intro 1211 within the city council which required developers receiving city grants to set aside 15% of that total number of units for homeless ready families. independently,” he recalls. The nonprofit, Coalition for the Homeless, described the bill as a “historic vote” that “represents a major turning point in the fight against the city’s record homelessness crisis”.

Serving in Albany, Zaccaro Jr. said, would allow him to do more to find solutions to the multiple housing issues facing the city. “At the state level, we must find creative ways to expand on this original thinking by providing additional housing subsidies, while ending the practice of paying market-rate rents to shelter providers for below average temporary housing,” he said.

To complete his third campaign priority, education. The candidate previously served as the Bronx’s director for intergovernmental affairs under former schools chancellor Carmen Farina. As a father of three children, there is nothing more important, I believe, apart from the health and well-being of a child, than the education our children receive, ensuring that ‘they get a quality education, that we have schools that are performing and schools that are not overcrowded,’ he said.

Zaccaro Jr. is a North Bronx product. Born at North Central Bronx Hospital in Norwood, he attended PS 246, located across from Poe Park in Fordham Manor, JHS 143 John Peter Tetard in Kingsbridge Heights, which closed in 2007, and then DeWitt Clinton High School in Jerome Park.

He is open about his struggles as a teenage student. “I struggled in high school and ended up in a transitional high school which is CUNY Prep, which is here in the White Plains Road district,” he recalled. He said he also had to take on household responsibilities from an early age. “Being the only man in the house, raised by a single mother, I had an obligation from the age of 12 to work, support and help,” he said.

From humble beginnings, strong ties to his community, and now with more than 14 years of experience working for municipal government, Zaccaro Jr. believes he has what it takes to make the leap into lawmaking. at the state level. Asked to describe the year 80 AD, he praised its diversity, citing former Mayor David Dinkins’ oft-quoted description of New York as “a beautiful mosaic”.

The candidate added that he sees the neighborhood as filled with rich culture. “Wherever you go, in every corner of the district, you can find such great diversity,” he said. “You go to Little Yemen, and you see what they’ve built for themselves, and how we coexist, and the work we do together.”

Zaccaro Jr. is a member of the executive board of the Liberty Democratic Association, a member of the Pelham Parkway Neighborhood Association, and a former board member of the Bronx Community Board 7. The Pelham Parkway resident wants voters to know that his lived experience l has prepared for what he hopes will be an opportunity to better serve his community. Whether it’s quality of life issues, housing issues, or finding solutions for better education, he’s asking voters to give him a chance to solve the problem for them from Albany.

“It’s the issues that are important to me, the issues that I hear about from my neighbors that are important to them,” he said. “These are the issues that I feel I also have the experience to address and I look forward to doing so as soon as I take office.”

Election day is November 8. Early voting continues until November 6. Check your polling place in advance.

*Síle Moloney contributed to this story.

]]>
Nominate Citizens, Organization of the Year 2022 https://avvensanchea.com/nominate-citizens-organization-of-the-year-2022/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/nominate-citizens-organization-of-the-year-2022/ CHRIS ETLING Editor of the Daily Sun It’s an election year, which means you’ve likely been bombarded with negative ads from both sides criticizing potential candidates, and you could be in for some heated conversations around the Thanksgiving dinner table. So let’s take a moment to look at the positives here in our community. Here’s […]]]>

CHRIS ETLING Editor of the Daily Sun

It’s an election year, which means you’ve likely been bombarded with negative ads from both sides criticizing potential candidates, and you could be in for some heated conversations around the Thanksgiving dinner table. So let’s take a moment to look at the positives here in our community.

Here’s one way to give thanks as the holiday season approaches: honor a colleague, neighbor, acquaintance or someone you’ve admired from afar with a nomination as Flagstaff Citizen of the Year.

The Daily Sun has sponsored the award for more than six decades, and it includes three categories: Male Citizen, Female Citizen and Organization of the Year. The award recognizes a person who has made Flagstaff a better place over the past year as a volunteer, not in their primary line of work. It can be a one-time project or an ongoing cause. Civic groups can nominate this year’s outstanding member, but it can also be a family member, neighbor or friend. Young, old or in between – there are no limits to these rewards.

People also read…

There is also no formal application process. Just send an e-mail to cetling@azdailysun.com and tell us why you think the person or organization has made Flagstaff and Northern Arizona a better place to live through their volunteer efforts.

Please limit submissions to less than 500 words or they may be cut off from the nomination package for past winners. Please include the text in the body of the email or as a .doc attachment; no PDF if possible. We will be accepting applications until the end of November.

Winners will be announced in the newspaper early in the new year. Judging is done by a panel of past winners, not the Daily Sun. Past winners are not eligible; see list below.

For questions, call editor Chris Etling at (928) 556-2274 or editor Colleen Brady at (928) 556-2279.

Citizens of the Year

Cheri Ossenfort and Jake Bacon, 2021; Cheryl Blume and Carl Taylor, 2020; Rose Toehe and Dr. David Spence, 2019; Lina Wallen and Ken Lamm, 2018; Lora Trujillo and Barry Brennan, 2017; Brenda Silveus and Neil Weintraub, 2016; Sally Veazey and Jim David, 2015; Karen Kinne-Herman, Becky Lewis and Billy Weldon, 2014; Sarah Cromer, Gene Munger and Nat White, 2013; Mary Hostetler and Dr Henry Poore, 2012; Barbara Packard, Hal Jensen and Joe Ray, 2011; Paula Stefani and Doug Rade, 2010; Bunny Gaylord and Jack Welch, 2009; Pam Turner and Bill Packard, 2008; Molly Munger and Dr. Richard Haag, 2007; Sister Elizabeth Carey and Dr. John Caskey, 2006; Susie Garretson and LaVelle McCoy, 2005; Stephanie Rust and Mike Cromer, 2004; Marj McClanahan, Jim Driscoll and Chris Bavasi, 2003; Jan Newton and Danny Neal, 2002; Patricia Hecht, Patrick Nackard and David McKay, 2001; Julianne Hartzell and Jim Dykes, 2000; Catharine B. Adel and Bill Williams, 1999; Florence Karlstrom and Dr. Walt Taylor, 1998; Hazel Robinson and Joe Donaldson, 1997; Barbara Cline and Paul Sweitzer, 1996; Lee Harsh and Douglas Jackson, 1995; Kay McKay and George McCullough, 1994; David Vaselaar and Peg Hebets, 1993; Jack Duffy and Doris Harper White, 1992. Also, Judy Feldstein and Pastor Harry Benson, 1991; Harold Weller and Nina Poore, 1990; Katherin Chase and John Montfort, 1989; Eugene M. Hughes and Barbara Conley, 1988; Dr. William Gaylord and Nancy Warden, 1987; Pat B. Curry and Nancye Setser, 1986; Marshall Knoles and Lorraine Curry, 1985; Anne Tinsley and Manuel D. DeMiguel, 1984; Frances B. McAllister and Dr. J. Otto Berg, 1983; Helen Earnshaw and David D. Chase, 1982; Rayma Babbitt Sharber and John J. Gisi, 1981; Phyllis Manning and Dr Frank Besnette, 1980. Others include Billie Williams Yost and Reverend William Denlinger, 1979; Robert Blaser, 1978; Henry Giclas and Robert Nauman, 1977; Platt Cline, 1976; Agnes Allen and John W. Stilley, 1975; H. Stuart Houston and Virginia Downum, 1974; Ralph Bilby, 1973; Dr. Garland Wood, 1972; Bernice Giclas and Sturgeon Cromer, 1971; Harry Brown, 1970. Other previous winners are Dr. Minnie Roseberry, 1969; State Sen. T. M. Knoles Jr. and Douglas Wall, 1968; Mayor Rollin Wheeler, 1967; J. Lawrence Walkup, 1966; Viola Babbitt, 1965; Ethel Sechrist and John G. Babbitt, 1964; No recipient, 1963; HV Emblen and Ione McCauley, 1962; and Walter Bennett, 1961.

Organizations of the year

Community Emergency Response Team, 2021; N/A, 2020; Catholic Charities, 2019; Willow Bend Environmental Education Center, 2018; Friends of Northern Arizona Forests, 2017; DREAMS, 2016; Forest Highlands Foundation, 2015; Flagstaff Leadership Program, 2014; Poore Free Medical Clinic, 2013; Flagstaff Science Festival, 2012; Friends of Camp Colton, 2011; New Hope Cottage, 2010; St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance, 2009; Raymond Educational Foundation, 2008; Flagstaff Community Foundation, 2007; court-appointed special advocates, 2006; Sunnyside Neighborhood Association, 2005; The PEACE Project, 2004; Coconino Coalition for Children and Youth, 2003; Northern Arizona Sexual Assault Center, 2002; Theatrikos, 2001; Toys for toddlers, 2000; Museum of Northern Arizona, 1999; Society of Saint Vincent de Paul, 1998; Coconino County Victim/Witness Services, 1997; The American Red Cross, 1996; Coconino County Literacy Volunteers, 1995; Northland Family Help Centre, 1994; Flagstaff Family Food Center, 1993; Hospice Northland, 1992; The American Legion and Auxiliary Legion, 1991; The Flagstaff Sunrise Lions, 1990; The Flagstaff Elks Lodge, 1989; Flagstaff Soroptimists Club, 1988; Also, Flagstaff’s Sheriff’s Posse, 1987; No winner in 1986; Flagstaff Exchange Club, 1985; Flagstaff Aid League, 1984; Big Brothers of Flagstaff and Big Sisters of Northern Arizona, 1983; Pilot Club of Flagstaff, Inc., 1982; Flagstaff Corps, Salvation Army, 1981; Board of Trustees, Flagstaff Symphony, 1980; Flagstaff Citizens, 1979; United Way of Flagstaff, 1978; Sunshine Rescue Mission, 1977; Flagstaff Hospital Auxiliary, 1976; and Coconino County Search and Rescue, 1975.

]]>
St. Pete City Council approves Coquina Key Plaza redevelopment despite residents’ refusal https://avvensanchea.com/st-pete-city-council-approves-coquina-key-plaza-redevelopment-despite-residents-refusal/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 03:05:27 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/st-pete-city-council-approves-coquina-key-plaza-redevelopment-despite-residents-refusal/ ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (WFLA) — Despite strong opposition from many residents who live near Coquina Key Plaza, St. Pete City Council voted 6-1 to approve a deal with a developer and its rezoning application to transform the retail and apartment site. “It seems like a town that developers are in control of,” said Walter Border, […]]]>

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (WFLA) — Despite strong opposition from many residents who live near Coquina Key Plaza, St. Pete City Council voted 6-1 to approve a deal with a developer and its rezoning application to transform the retail and apartment site.

“It seems like a town that developers are in control of,” said Walter Border, president of the Bahama Shores Neighborhood Association.

Since the closure of the Save-A-Lot food store at Coquina Key Plaza, many residents say their southern St. Pete neighborhood is now a food wasteland.

“We have an area of ​​almost three miles with no groceries anyway,” said Andrew Fivecoat.

Borden lives less than a mile from the deserted strip mall.

“For me, I have a car,” he said. “I drive to Publix and it’s not a problem, but there are a lot of older people in the neighborhood who don’t have proper transportation.”

Despite Borden and several intervenors’ refusal at a second public hearing Thursday night, the city council approved Stoneweg US LLC’s plan for mixed-use space with retail and up to 465 apartments.

Twenty percent of the units will be designated as Affordable Workforce Housing.

“Something that’s been difficult for the city to get developers to do in our partnerships and they’re doing it on their own,” City Council President Gina Driscoll said ahead of the vote.

Residents wanted council to reject the developer’s plan because they say it doesn’t leave enough space for a large supermarket.

The promoter’s lawyer said he recently received a letter of intent from a food retailer.

“We’re working and reiterating those terms to get to the final point to sign a lease,” Craig Taraszki said, “but we’re very confident we can get there with this tenant or another.”

But residents who feel the city council did not digest the information they presented said they were unconvinced the developer would have a solution to their neighborhood’s needs.

“Five thousand square feet is not a big grocery store,” Borden said. “It’s definitely not a grocery store with a pharmacy.”

Taraszki said he could not reveal which food retailer submitted the letter of intent due to a confidentiality agreement.

Then the developer will apply for building permits and construction at Coquina Key Plaza could begin in late spring or summer.

]]>
Sadie Shaw curates SaludArte COVID-inspired art project https://avvensanchea.com/sadie-shaw-curates-saludarte-covid-inspired-art-project/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 21:59:15 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/sadie-shaw-curates-saludarte-covid-inspired-art-project/ A new program called SaludArte will be an opportunity for Pima County residents to reflect on their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, and will be led by Sadie Shaw, a local artist and TUSD board member. Shaw will oversee the project as the Arts Foundation’s new Community Design Lead for Tucson and Southern Arizona. Shaw […]]]>

A new program called SaludArte will be an opportunity for Pima County residents to reflect on their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, and will be led by Sadie Shaw, a local artist and TUSD board member.

Shaw will oversee the project as the Arts Foundation’s new Community Design Lead for Tucson and Southern Arizona.

Shaw said he has volunteered for the Arts Foundation “for years.” Additionally, she has had experiences as an activist and community activist that have prepared her for the work she will do for the non-profit group.

SaludArte is a partnership between the organization and the Pima County Health Department.

In addition to incorporating the stories of Tucson-area residents, the project will also “select local artists to create interpretive representations of these experiences and coordinate a county-wide health and wellness cultural fair.” at the end of the arts”.

Shaw and project organizers will determine which ZIP codes have been hardest hit by COVID-19 and create art installations in those locations.

Her previous experiences of how illnesses affect different communities inspired her to use art as a way to provide emotional relief after hurtful events.

“My cousin had passed away. He had been sick for a while, but he didn’t have health insurance. He was still waiting to get one through his job,” Shaw said. “Art was a way for me to deal with that.”

“You know, COVID isn’t the only one,” Shaw said. “There are many diseases that can be treated through the same lens.”

Shaw found an outlet in art to overcome his grief. She also knew that with the death of her cousin, stories about her community came with her.

She decided to compile oral histories. Shaw is the president of the Sugar Hill Neighborhood Association and created a mural in the Bronx Wash neighborhood.

A native of Tucson, Shaw went to the University of Central Florida for her BFA in Art and Visual Culture Education, which she earned in 2019.

Arts Foundation work is a paid position for Shaw. His seat on the Tucson Unified School District Board is a voluntarily elected position.

The Arts Foundation for Tucson and Southern Arizona is funded by the City of Tucson, Pima County, and grants from the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. The group, formerly known as the Tucson Pima Arts Council, was founded in 1984 and manages public art processes for the city and county.

]]>
Local officials to unveil plans to slow traffic on Washington Avenue https://avvensanchea.com/local-officials-to-unveil-plans-to-slow-traffic-on-washington-avenue/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 19:33:20 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/local-officials-to-unveil-plans-to-slow-traffic-on-washington-avenue/ Local officials to unveil plans to slow traffic on Washington Avenue October 18, 2022 A push by North Loop residents to slow traffic on a busy section of Washington Avenue will hopefully get results, with local authorities set to present their plans at a meeting on Monday, October 24 at 11:30 a.m.. It will […]]]>

Local officials to unveil plans to slow traffic on Washington Avenue


October 18, 2022

A push by North Loop residents to slow traffic on a busy section of Washington Avenue will hopefully get results, with local authorities set to present their plans at a meeting on Monday, October 24 at 11:30 a.m.. It will be at the TractorWorks Building, 800 North of Washingtonand the public is invited to attend.

There are no stop lights or stop signs in Washington between 10th and 6th Avenue, an area filled with restaurants, bars and, quite often, high-speed vehicles.

The main area of ​​concern is the 8th Street intersection with all the pedestrians coming and going from places like Bar La Grassa, Borough, Snack Bar, Parlor, Bunkers and others, as well as 7th Street where people go and come through the tower tunnel.

“The main question is, how can we make it safe?” said David Crary, board member of the North Loop Neighborhood Association.

Washington Avenue is a Hennepin County road, so in June the NLNA invited County Commissioner Irene Fernando to attend a meeting and listen to neighborhood concerns. She could not come but sent her staff. Minneapolis City Councilman Michael Rainville was in attendance and pledged to help the county in any way he could.

City Council member Michael Rainville meets with concerned residents in June.

A petition campaignurging the county and city to work together to find solutions drew 648 signatures, which organizer Aileen Johnson will present to local officials at Monday’s meeting.

“They said they needed 90 days to come up with a plan to share,” Crary said. “And they better come back with a plan.”

]]>