united states – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 10:21:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://avvensanchea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6.png united states – AVV Ensanche A http://avvensanchea.com/ 32 32 Meet the Candidates for City Council https://avvensanchea.com/meet-the-candidates-for-city-council/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 10:21:06 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/meet-the-candidates-for-city-council/ Editor’s note: This story is the first in a series of stories leading up to the April 12 election. Follow the “Municipal Election 2022” tag to find out more. Simplified: Ten candidates are vying for four vacant seats on the Sioux Falls City Council. Here’s a rundown of who’s running. why is it important The […]]]>

Editor’s note: This story is the first in a series of stories leading up to the April 12 election. Follow the “Municipal Election 2022” tag to find out more.

Simplified: Ten candidates are vying for four vacant seats on the Sioux Falls City Council. Here’s a rundown of who’s running.

why is it important

  • The April 12 election will put at least two new faces on the boardbecause two of the four open seats have no incumbent.
  • City Council oversees the city of Sioux Falls’ more than $650 million budget – which are all your tax dollars at work.
  • Municipal elections in Sioux Falls historically have a low participation rate, which means that a small part of the population (about 30% of registered voters in the last municipal/municipal election in 2018) make decisions that affect the whole city. You can change that by voting on April 12 (or earlier if you want to vote by mail).

Here is a breakdown of the candidates. The candidates are listed in the order in which they will appear on the ballot.

At-Large “A”

At-Large Seats A and B represent the entire city. All voters will be able to choose one At-Large A Candidate and one At-Large B Candidate.

Sarah Cole

  • Age: 37
  • Profession: doctor at avera
  • Family: Two children, Jacob and Emily
  • Community Involvement: Cole moved to Sioux Falls in 2018. In her hometown of Moorhead, Minnesota, she was involved with Churches United for the Homeless and served as the neighborhood club activities coordinator. In Sioux Falls, she is part of the downtown Rotary.

Janet Brekke

  • Age: Refused to share
  • Profession: Serving councillor, former city attorney
  • Family: She and her husband, Jeff, have three adult children and three grandchildren.
  • Community Involvement: Brekke has been active in the Downtown Lions Club, Sioux Falls House, Church, Family Services, Junior League and Red Cross.

Bobbi Andera

  • Age: Turn 50 this month
  • Profession: Lab Business Operations Advisor, Sanford Lab Compliance Manager; president of B Enterprises, a life coaching company
  • Family: Seven siblings
  • Public Service: Andera is creating a non-profit organization to encourage strength. She is also a Daughter of the American Revolution and a veteran of the United States Air Force.

At-Large “B”

Pam Cole

  • Age: 54
  • Profession: Non-profit leader, director of the Nordland Heritage Foundation
  • Family: Cole and her husband, Mike, have five adult children
  • Community Involvement: Cole is a former state senator in the South Dakota Legislature representing Brookings, as well as a former Brookings school board member. She also helped with the Medicaid expansion ballot campaign.

Rich Merkouris

  • Age: 40
  • Profession: Non-profit administrator and pastor
  • Family: wife and three children
  • Community Involvement: Merkouris is a member of various organizations including the Hope Coalition, Compassion Childcare, and Empower Sioux Falls.

Southeast district

Only voters in the Southeast District will be able to choose one of these two candidates. To find your neighborhood, look at this map.

Cody Ingle

  • Age: 30
  • Profession: Claims Support Specialist with the Family Medicine Center
  • Family: None in town
  • Community Involvement: Ingle serves on the board of Sioux Falls Pride and also sits on the board of Pathways to Inclusive and Equitable Workplaces.

David Barranco

  • Age: 49
  • Profession: Attorney
  • Family: Wife, Catherine and two boys, Christopher and William
  • Community Involvement: Barranco coaches FCA Football.

central district

Only the voters of the central district will be able to choose one of these two candidates. To find your neighborhood, look at this map.

Jim Burzynski

  • Age: 39
  • Profession: Pharmacist for Avera
  • Family: Wife, Connie Taylor, and daughter Genevieve
  • Community Involvement: Burzynski served on the All Saints Neighborhood Association.

Emmett Reistroffer

  • Age: Turn 32 this month
  • Profession: COO for Genesis Farms, owner of Sioux Falls Pedicabs
  • Family: Originally from Sioux Falls, Reistroffer’s parents and older brother live in town.
  • Community Involvement: He participated in the Startup Sioux Falls Co. Starters program, is a long-time supporter of the arts – including his help in maintaining the mosaic along the downtown river. He is also a Freemason member of Unity Lodge and a member of Young Republicans.

Curt Soehl

  • Age: 62
  • Profession: Territory Manager for Farmers Union Insurance
  • Family: Wife of 42, three adult children, eight grandchildren
  • Community Involvement: Soehl serves on the Sioux Falls Sports Authority Board of Directors and the Downtown 2035 Plan Board of Directors. He has also served on several other boards, including the Youth Hockey Board.
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Does Minneapolis need a supervised drug injection site? A district is studying the idea. https://avvensanchea.com/does-minneapolis-need-a-supervised-drug-injection-site-a-district-is-studying-the-idea/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 18:32:36 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/does-minneapolis-need-a-supervised-drug-injection-site-a-district-is-studying-the-idea/ Where Stephen Gregg lives, near 26th Street and Bloomington Avenue in the working-class south Minneapolis neighborhood of East Phillips, used needles litter the sidewalks. In the summer, large groups gather against storefronts and openly use drugs much to the dismay of neighbors, who sometimes find bodies in their yards, Gregg said. Gregg approached the East […]]]>

Where Stephen Gregg lives, near 26th Street and Bloomington Avenue in the working-class south Minneapolis neighborhood of East Phillips, used needles litter the sidewalks. In the summer, large groups gather against storefronts and openly use drugs much to the dismay of neighbors, who sometimes find bodies in their yards, Gregg said.

Gregg approached the East Phillips Improvement Coalition neighborhood association to explore the possibility of creating an overdose prevention site, also called a supervised drug consumption site.

“It’s the most diverse neighborhood in the city. It’s one of the poorest. We’ve had all this environmental damage. It’s just a dumping ground for the city, and it’s also where these issues are. happen,” Gregg said. “We have a homelessness epidemic and an opioid epidemic, and it shouldn’t be the neighbors who have to fight this.”

He wrote a column for the neighborhood newspaper, The Alley, asking residents to recognize the reality of drugs in East Phillips. Gregg also asked them to consider establishing a facility where staff would be trained to administer naloxone, also known as Narcan, can provide sterile needles, prevent overdoses and guide treatment.

Southside Harm Reduction Services, which runs a needle exchange and contracts with the city’s health department to provide Narcan training, has held educational presentations at overdose prevention sites for the past several months. They and East Phillips neighbors plan to survey the neighborhood’s appetite through a mix of door-to-door and outreach to people who use drugs.

The concept is far from being implemented. There is no specific location being discussed, nor an established operator.

“It would be a great idea because we have people who use and the reality is they won’t quit unless they really want to,” said Cassandra Holmes, secretary of the East Phillips Improvement Coalition. “Instead of losing our loved ones, we should be able to provide space where they can safely use and we won’t have needles lying around for children, animals or other people to be harmed. “

Minneapolis is in the midst of an HIV epidemic with rates not seen since the HIV crisis began in the 1980s, said Noya Woodrich, the city’s assistant health commissioner, who links the outbreak to encampments and intravenous drug use. The latest statistics from the Minnesota Department of Health also show that there were 27% more overdose deaths in 2020 than in 2019.

At 26th and Bloomington, people come and buy drugs and leave; others stay in tents during the harsh winter. When the city disbands a homeless encampment, the camp residents gather their remaining belongings and relocate nearby. They say they use to survive.

“And what we’re doing right now in Minnesota is just not meeting people where they are, it’s not meeting people who need support,” said Jack Martin, director executive of Southside Harm Reduction. “We need to explore new avenues and adjust how we protect each other in Minnesota, and one idea is safe drinking sites.”

There are over 100 supervised injection sites in Europe, Australia and Canada. They vary greatly in ambiance and services provided. Some are furnished as living rooms with comfortable armchairs, ventilated private rooms, showers, computers and newspapers. Others are austere rooms with a display of clean supplies on flimsy tables, where people aren’t encouraged to linger. Some sites have nurses to care for wounds.

The first two supervised injection sites recognized by law in the United States opened in November in New York. Others exist but operate only underground because the federal government considers such sites illegal under the Controlled Substances Act, which prohibits operating any “place…for the purpose of using a controlled substance,” even if the drugs are not manufactured or sold locally.

When Safehouse, a Philadelphia-based harm reduction nonprofit, attempted to open a drug consumption site in 2019, it was sued by the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and ultimately lost on appeal. United States v. Safehouse provides a window into the forces that could come together on both sides of a pitched battle at these sites.

Safehouse supporters included medical associations, homelessness organizations and nine states seeking local power to try different public health approaches.

the American Medical Association supports the development of pilot supervised injection facilities, as studies in other countries show that such sites reduce fatal overdoses and the transmission of infectious diseases while increasing the number of people seeking drug treatment. Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison co-signed a brief supporting Safehouse, arguing that the Controlled Substances Act was passed to shut down “crack houses, not community health clinics.”

Opponents included 20 neighborhood associations and the police union.

Objectors argued that supervised drug consumption sites would attract predatory drug dealers and create “criminal economic zones” in which the police would not be able to fight trafficking, because the success of harm reduction sites depends on the capacity people to come and go “without any interference from the law enacted.” They also cited an economic situation review by the government of the Canadian province of Alberta showing that clean-up crews continued to find hundreds of discarded needles a day near the sites and that local businesses complained of drug trafficking and theft.

“There are different issues, pros and cons, and I just want them to be aware,” said East Phillips resident Schuyler Sellars, who thinks medical institutions should also be at the table throughout the planning. “Perhaps the site itself [might] be safe, but the surrounding area may not be.”

With the US Department of Justice under a new administration, officials are evaluating supervised drug consumption sites for potential pilots as part of a comprehensive approach to harm reduction strategies, the agency Recount the Associated Press earlier this month.

“We have pretty conclusive evidence from international models, and the results are very compelling,” said Dr. Gavin Bart, director of addiction medicine at Hennepin Healthcare. Studies show they lead to a reduction in overdose deaths, ambulance trips and complaints of discarded needles without increasing crime or 911 calls, while a quarter to a third of people who frequent the sites want access some form of treatment, he said.

“Yes [East Phillips] managed to put together a facility like that, we have to be realistic. It won’t solve drug problems in Minneapolis, but it could probably help within a four-block radius of the location in terms of reducing overdose deaths, overdose ambulance calls, drug paraphernalia,” he said. can expect to improve.”

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Tribute to Paloma Vazquez, a Latina trans woman remembered by her community https://avvensanchea.com/tribute-to-paloma-vazquez-a-latina-trans-woman-remembered-by-her-community/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 18:19:41 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/tribute-to-paloma-vazquez-a-latina-trans-woman-remembered-by-her-community/ More than 10,000 hate crimes in the United States involve a firearm each year, which equates to more than 28 a day, according to a 2020 report by HRC, Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund, Giffords Law Center and Equality Florida titled “Remembering and Honoring Pulse: Anti-LGBTQ Bias and Guns Are Killing Countless LGBTQ People. […]]]>

More than 10,000 hate crimes in the United States involve a firearm each year, which equates to more than 28 a day, according to a 2020 report by HRC, Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund, Giffords Law Center and Equality Florida titled “Remembering and Honoring Pulse: Anti-LGBTQ Bias and Guns Are Killing Countless LGBTQ People. The report also notes a marked increase in anti-LGBTQ+ hate crimes, particularly against transgender people. According to the 2017-2019 Transgender Homicide Tracker, three-quarters of confirmed homicides against transgender people involved a firearm, and nearly eight in 10 homicides of black trans women involve a firearm. Additionally, advocates saw a 43% increase in the formation of anti-LGBTQ+ hate groups in 2019.

At the state level, transgender and gender nonconforming people in Texas are not protected from discrimination in employment, housing, education, and public spaces. Although Texas includes sexual orientation as a protected characteristic in its hate crimes law, it does not expressly include gender identity. While we have recently seen political gains that support and affirm transgender people, we have also faced anti-LGBTQ+ attacks at many levels of government this year. As of this writing, more than 270 anti-LGBTQ+ bills are being considered in state legislatures across the country, with more than 110 of these directly targeting transgender people.

In Texas, Governor Greg Abbott and Attorney General Ken Paxton sparked national outrage by pushing state officials to actively investigate and target parents of transgender teens for what the governor mistakenly calls “child abuse.” children”. This stands in stark contrast to guidelines issued by the Biden administration and the Department of Health and Human Services which specify that child welfare agencies have an obligation to protect transgender youth, including with respect to gender-affirming care. In response, HHS issued guidelines stating that health care providers are not required to disclose their patients’ private information, including gender-affirming care information. HHS also issued guidelines saying it is illegal to deny health care based on gender identity and outlined steps for filing a civil rights complaint with the Office for Civil Rights.

We must demand better from our elected officials and reject harmful anti-transgender legislation at the local, state and federal levels, while considering all possible means to make the end of this violence a reality. It is clear that lethal violence disproportionately affects transgender women of color, particularly black transgender women. The intersections of racism, transphobia, sexism, biphobia and homophobia combine to deprive them of the necessities to live and thrive, so we must all work together to cultivate acceptance, reject hate and end stigma for all members of the trans and gender nonconforming community.

  • More resources: Read more about cases of fatal violence followed by the HRC whose details are unclear. You can find a list of such cases here.

  • Watch this PSA campaign elevating stories of joy and trans love.

  • Join HRC’s CountMeIn campaign to take action on behalf of transgender and non-binary people.

  • Read these guidelines and FAQs for journalists to ensure greater accuracy and respect in reporting.

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New Disney+ Show ‘Lost Man Found’ Begins Production in the Vine Neighborhood of Kalamazoo https://avvensanchea.com/new-disney-show-lost-man-found-begins-production-in-the-vine-neighborhood-of-kalamazoo/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/new-disney-show-lost-man-found-begins-production-in-the-vine-neighborhood-of-kalamazoo/ KALAMAZOO, MI — A new show set to begin airing on Disney+ this summer, “Lost Man Found,” is gearing up to begin filming in the Vine neighborhood of Kalamazoo. The team members were scouting the neighborhood on Monday, March 7. Producer Takuma Hayashi told MLive that actual filming will start on March 14 and is […]]]>

KALAMAZOO, MI — A new show set to begin airing on Disney+ this summer, “Lost Man Found,” is gearing up to begin filming in the Vine neighborhood of Kalamazoo.

The team members were scouting the neighborhood on Monday, March 7. Producer Takuma Hayashi told MLive that actual filming will start on March 14 and is expected to wrap on March 25.

The show, he said, is a semi-realistic, comedic story about a Japanese actor and his struggles to rise to fame and fall in love. It is based on a book that was only published in Japanese, he said.

NHK Japan, which is similar to the BBC network, is initially handling the production/airing of the show, but it will eventually air on Disney+, Hayashi said. Radiant Pictures’ Hayashi said the scenes will be shot in both English and Japanese, depending on the scene.

Based in Los Angeles, Hayashi is on location and directing production for both episodes filmed in Kalamazoo. Filming for the series began earlier this year in Japan, where the other episodes of the series are set, he said. On Monday, the crew spent part of the day at Satellite Records, which will be one of two main filming locations, along with Martini’s restaurant, located just down the street on South Westnedge Avenue.

The show, Hayashi said, is filmed in Kalamazoo because the actor the story is based on had a brother, Takeshi, who he lost contact with after the brother moved from Japan to Kalamazoo.

As happened in real life, after 15 years apart, a friend of Takeshi’s reaches out to the actor’s agent once Takeshi is terminally ill. This leads to the actor, Satoru, traveling to Kalamazoo for what is also the actor’s first trip to the United States, Hayashi said.

The real-life brother, Hayashi said, had worked at Martini, which is why the restaurant was selected as one of the locations for the site. The other location, Satellite, will be converted from a record store to a hybrid video/disc store where the brother’s friend had worked and where people regularly hung out, Hayashi said.

“‘Lost Man Found’ is about the actor, how he became an actor and his story, but these two episodes are about his brother and their relationship, and how they come together,” a- he declared. “It’s based on a true, but fictional story. So there are a lot of things we shoot that don’t fit 100% with their story. »

Most of the filming will take place indoors, he said, but those who pass through or live in the Vine neighborhood could see cinematic activity unfold in the coming weeks.

The show stars Japanese actors Taiga Nakano and Tsuyoshi Kusanagi, the latter of whom is a former member of popular Japanese boy group SMAP. Kusanagi, he said, is sort of the Japanese equivalent of Justin Timberlake.

Both stars are in Kalamazoo for filming, but the show’s third star, Sairi Ito, is not making the trip and is only featured in the Japanese episodes, Hayashi said.

“We’re just grateful to the neighborhood association, Satellite and Martini’s for being so accommodating,” he said. “We were hoping it would be a little drier and a little warmer, but next week isn’t looking good. We’re all from LA mostly and Monday and Tuesday have a 30% chance of snow/ rain both days.

“It’s not that good.”

Satellite Records assistant manager Bunny Villare said they were happy to offer Satellite’s store as a filming location.

“We thought it would be good exposure for the store, and they seemed like really open, honest, nice guys,” Villaire said. “The story is somewhat true to life of something that happened in the Vine neighborhood and we really connect with the Vine neighborhood so we thought it would be really good to help introduce a Vine neighborhood story.”

The satellite will be mostly closed March 21-23 while filming on location, but those wishing to purchase records can go to the back entrance of the store on those days, Villaire said.

Also on MLive:

After 65 years as a hub for students, the Bernhard Center in West Michigan will be demolished

Kalamazoo offers $150,000 to tenant and landlord after demolishing home in clash with police

Detroit Lions leader at No. 2, more sightings from 2022 NFL overall

Two years into the COVID pandemic, these myths still persist

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Legal aid for immigrants facing deportation moves forward in Oregon Senate – Oregon Capital Chronicle https://avvensanchea.com/legal-aid-for-immigrants-facing-deportation-moves-forward-in-oregon-senate-oregon-capital-chronicle/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 01:41:41 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/legal-aid-for-immigrants-facing-deportation-moves-forward-in-oregon-senate-oregon-capital-chronicle/ The United States Constitution guarantees that anyone facing serious criminal charges can be represented by an attorney, and anyone who cannot afford an attorney will have one free of charge. People threatened with deportation do not have this guarantee of a lawyer. That could change under a proposal passed by the Oregon Senate in a […]]]>

The United States Constitution guarantees that anyone facing serious criminal charges can be represented by an attorney, and anyone who cannot afford an attorney will have one free of charge. People threatened with deportation do not have this guarantee of a lawyer.

That could change under a proposal passed by the Oregon Senate in a 17-8 vote on Monday. If he receives the approval of the House and Governor Kate Brown, Senate Bill 1543 would set aside $15 million for attorneys to provide free legal representation on immigration matters, prioritizing deportation cases.

Senator Kate Lieber, the Beaverton Democrat behind the bill, said it was driven by fairness.

“The bill is intended to provide due process to those who need it and to allow a judge to decide whether someone is allowed to stay in this country based on the facts of the case,” he said. she declared. “And by the way, as much as we love to hate lawyers, we’re making the court process much smoother for the entire system, including our immigration system.”

Oregon is home to about 108,000 undocumented immigrants, the nonpartisan agency says Migration Policy Institute. Undocumented migrants make up about 2.5% of the state’s population, and the vast majority come from Mexico and Central American countries.

About 9,200 people escape deportation through the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which in certain circumstances protects people who entered the country illegally as minors. Everyone else faces deportation, although the federal government prioritizes the deportation of people who have committed serious crimes, who are considered a serious threat to national security, or who have recently entered the country.

Senate Minority Leader Tim Knopp, R-Bend, said prioritizing legal representation for immigrants detained by law enforcement means the state will most likely end up paying to help people who have committed crimes to stay in the country. He and every other Republican in attendance on Monday voted against the bill.

“There are some people that I’m not interested in spending taxpayers’ money on trying to keep them in the country,” Knopp said. “I don’t know why we would want to keep someone with a criminal record of murder, rape, kidnapping in the country.”

The proposal received support from community service organizations, as well as the Oregon State Bar, the Oregon Education Association, the City of Portland, and major unions, including the Service Employees International Union, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the American Federation. of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations.

While the bill requires legal services for detainees and those at imminent risk of deportation to be given priority, the money could also be used for other immigration issues that may require the assistance of a lawyer.

Lawmakers heard in writing and in a committee hearing earlier this month from several immigrants who got legal help through Equity Corps Oregon, a nonprofit program that provided pro legal advice. bono to immigrants over the past two years.

Blanca Valle, who described herself in a letter sent to lawmakers as a mother of two from Honduras, said she had participated in the program but had not yet received a lawyer. She has had to attend several hearings alone and she does not know how her case is going, she said.

“I don’t know what to do or what to say, I don’t know how to act. With a lawyer, I would feel more protected, more supported, I would know who to ask all my questions,” Valle said. “I would like to know where my file is.

In another letter, translated from Spanish, Portland resident Micaela Adamar Gaspar Mendez told lawmakers that she was only able to apply for asylum and receive a work permit because a community organization helped find a pro bono lawyer.

Gaspar Mendez, 20, left Guatemala when she was 16 years pregnant because her life was in danger, she wrote. She came to Oregon, where her father lived, and connected with the Equity Corps of Oregon, where an attorney helped her apply for asylum. His work permit arrived recently and it changed his life, said Gaspar Mendez.

“What I want in the United States is a better life for my children,” she said. “In Guatemala, where I grew up, there was a lot of poverty and violence. I was only able to study for three years, then they took me out of school because I had to help my grandparents. I want my children to have a better life.

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Jewish and Japanese American groups among growing multiracial efforts calling for reparations for black Americans https://avvensanchea.com/jewish-and-japanese-american-groups-among-growing-multiracial-efforts-calling-for-reparations-for-black-americans/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/jewish-and-japanese-american-groups-among-growing-multiracial-efforts-calling-for-reparations-for-black-americans/ Black leaders of the civil rights movement were among the biggest supporters of the effort, she says. Masaoka said the winning reparations gave the Japanese-American community strength, a chance to stand up and a sense of responsibility. Now she wants the black community to have the same. “I think we’ve always felt very connected to […]]]>

Black leaders of the civil rights movement were among the biggest supporters of the effort, she says. Masaoka said the winning reparations gave the Japanese-American community strength, a chance to stand up and a sense of responsibility. Now she wants the black community to have the same.

“I think we’ve always felt very connected to other communities of color and have seen similarities in our own situations,” Masaoka, Nikkei co-chair for civil rights and redress, told CNN. “We can fight for this and if we unite and build solidarity we can change this country and we can all heal,” she said.

Restorative efforts are also seen in states, cities, municipalities, and historic institutions, as they have begun to explore new ways to address past transgressions.

Last week, a student organization at the University of Chicago called on its university to pay more than $1 billion in repairs to the city’s South Side over the next 20 years. UChicago Against Displacement said in an op-ed that their university has been an “active participant in segregation and redlining” and that the money will provide “real, long-term affordable housing.”
Earlier this month, a Boston city councilman proposed a new commission to study reparations and other forms of compensation for the city’s role in slavery and inequality. Over two years, the commission would investigate the disparities and “historic damage” suffered by black Bostonians, drawing on historical documents, archival research and reaching out to the community.
Last year, California became the first state to establish a reparations task force to study the state’s role in perpetuating the legacy of slavery and to offer recommendations. Under AB3121, the task force is expected to recommend legislation this year.

These ongoing conversations at various levels have been led by black people supporting the quest for reparations, but other communities are now joining in their support.

These diverse groups are among more than 350 organizations that support HR 40. The commission would also examine how the United States would issue a formal apology for “the commission of gross human rights violations and crimes against humanity on the African slaves and their descendants”.

Rep. Lee, who reintroduced HR 40 last year, told CNN that the fact that other communities have received reparations at the federal level shows Congress can do the same for black people.

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, right, speaks during a 2019 hearing on reparations for descendants of enslaved Americans.
HR 40 was first introduced to Congress by Michigan Democrat John Conyers in 1989. Former Rep. Conyers, who served until 2017, had consistently lobbied for reparations legislation on several occasions over the course of several sessions of Congress. After he left, Representative Lee became the bill’s chief advocate.

Early last year, the bill was introduced by the House Judiciary Committee in a 25-17 vote and now faces a full House vote. Rep. Lee is hopeful and says more than 200 of her colleagues are ready to vote to pass the bill. But she is also aware that the bill is being defeated in the Senate vote and urges her colleagues to understand that enslaved black people created the economic engine from which the nation was built.

Support for reparations from people outside the black community is a sign that the American Jewish and Japanese communities are on the side of justice, says Kamm Howard.

Howard, who is the national male co-chair of the National Black Coalition for Reparations in America, says that if the federal government is trying to address the harm inflicted on other communities, it’s only fair that lawmakers find a way to grant reparations to black Americans.

“There has been no attempt by the US government to specifically address the harm and the continuing harm being done to us,” Howard told CNN.

A Jewish Moral Appeal

Some members of the American Jewish community have long won support for the reparations. In 2019, the Union for Reform Judaism passed a pro-reparations resolution calling for a federal commission to “study and develop reparations proposals to address the historic and ongoing effects of slavery” and “systemic” racism against black Americans.

Yolanda Savage-Narva is the Director of Racial Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at the Religious Action Center for Reform Judaism, the part of the Union for Reform Judaism that focuses on advocacy and advocacy work. social justice.

“Our organization really understood that the call to study reparations was a Jewish moral call,” she told CNN. “It is imperative to ensure that every part of our humanity is seen as fair human beings and the call for reparations was a gesture for Reform Jewry to really put a stake in the ground.”

Holocaust victims within the Jewish community have received reparations and continue to receive annual pensions from the German and French governments.

Savage-Narva said she thinks it adds support and shows the United States that acknowledging and paying reparations is an important step in the healing process.

“The German government has really done what it has to do in terms of truth and reconciliation, and is committed, as far as possible, to making an effort to undo the harm that has been done,” he said. she declared. “Because the Jewish community has had their own historical trauma, they can make that connection and understand how important the process of reparation is.”

Why Japanese Americans Received Reparations

The Japanese-American community was one of the first communities to receive reparations from the US government and has supported the reparations movement for decades.

Japanese Americans who were interned in concentration camps in the United States during World War II from around 1942 to 1946 received reparations under the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. More than four decades later their imprisonment, the law awarded each surviving former internee $20,000.

Traci Kato-Kiriyama is the lead organizer of the Joint Reparations Committee of the Nikkei Progressives, a multigenerational community group that advocates for immigrant rights and issues for Japanese Americans, Muslims, and Little Tokyo.

“One of the reasons we understand the importance of reparations is to look at remedies and reparations for Japanese Americans,” Kato-Kiriyama told CNN. “It took the support of all kinds of people to come together, and we couldn’t have done it alone.”

David Inoue, executive director of the Japanese American Citizens League, said supporting the movement to pass HR 40 is the right thing to do and will lead to a better understanding and response to “current injustices rooted in the system”.

Inoue told CNN he thinks Congress is in a much different situation since Japanese Americans received reparations.

“The more of us who talk, the harder it will be to ignore us and our country’s responsibility to address and respond to this historic injustice,” Inoue said.

“We need federal reparations”

The idea of ​​reparations has been an ongoing debate since the end of the Civil War in 1865, when freed slaves were promised 40 acres and a mule. The founding meeting of the National Coalition of Black for Reparations in America in 1987 came together with the goal of broadening the base of support for the long-standing reparations movement.
Bill HR 40 was then introduced in 1989. Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates renewed the conversation about reparations in his 2014 article in The Atlantic, “The Case for Reparations”. Since its reintroduction into mainstream media, efforts have been made at the community, state, and national levels to compensate black people for slavery and systemic racism issues.
Author Ta-Nehisi Coates waits to testify about reparations for descendants of enslaved Americans at a hearing in 2019.

“All of these efforts, no matter where they take place, are important and good to keep moving forward,” Kato-Kiriyama told CNN. “It also reminds us that we don’t have to wait for a huge federal bill, although we do need federal reparations.”

At the national level, the movement for reparations is expected to take time.

Experts say that if the bill makes it through the House, it faces opposition from some Democrats and most Republicans – and is unlikely to have enough votes for a majority on trial filibuster in the Senate.

Dr. Ron Daniels, head of the National African American Reparations Commission, told CNN he finds remarkable how far the idea of ​​reparations has come since it was introduced as an education bill in 1989.

“We’re knocking on the door for HR 40 to be enacted either by statute or more likely by executive order,” he said. “This is a major moment in American history.”

There are five major wounds of slavery that still plague the black community today, including people status and nation status; education; health; penalty sanction; and wealth and poverty, according to the NCOBRA.

Howard said the bill would look at those ongoing injuries, among other things, to define the degree of harm the black community has suffered and continues to suffer.

“There is a rise in racism today against African Americans and the pressure needs to be: why have Americans not been able to find a way to ease racial tensions?” Rep. Lee told CNN. “Every time we move on, something brings us back to issues of race. This bill provides an opportunity to bring people together through understanding.”

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US, Europe step up Russia sanctions to target Putin directly https://avvensanchea.com/us-europe-step-up-russia-sanctions-to-target-putin-directly/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 22:37:07 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/us-europe-step-up-russia-sanctions-to-target-putin-directly/ The SIS Building in London is lit up in yellow and blue in an expression of solidarity with Ukraine following Russia’s invasion, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022. (Kirsty O’Connor/PA via AP) Kirsty O’Connor PA BRUSSELS The United States and European allies said Friday they were stepping up sanctions over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine by adding measures […]]]>

The SIS Building in London is lit up in yellow and blue in an expression of solidarity with Ukraine following Russia's invasion, Thursday, Feb.  24, 2022. (Kirsty O'Connor/PA via AP)

The SIS Building in London is lit up in yellow and blue in an expression of solidarity with Ukraine following Russia’s invasion, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022. (Kirsty O’Connor/PA via AP)

PA

The United States and European allies said Friday they were stepping up sanctions over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine by adding measures directly targeting President Vladimir Putin and his foreign minister, putting diplomatic appeals to one side as Russia’s forces closed on Ukraine’s capital.

The move by the US, the European Union and Britain sends “a clear message about the strength of the opposition to the actions” by Putin, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said. On a day when explosions and gunfire were sounding in Kyiv’s capital, and Pope Francis went to Russia’s embassy in Rome to appeal for an end, the sanctions were part of growing global condemnation of the attack.

Asked by reporters if US President Joe Biden had planned any more direct diplomatic overtures toward Putin, whose ground, air and amphibious forces are all pushing an offensive on Ukraine’s key cities, Psaki said no.

“I would say that a moment where a leader is … in the middle of invading a sovereign country is not the moment where diplomacy feels appropriate,” Psaki reporter told at a White House briefing. “It does not mean we have ruled out diplomacy forever.”

PSAKI said the US was preparing individual sanctions on Putin and Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, likely to include travel bans. The announcement came hours after the European Union announced it intended to freeze Putin’s assets, and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told NATO leaders his country would also sanction Putin and Lavrov.

The US and European allies announced sweeping sanctions Thursday against Russia’s banks, state-owned enterprises and elites, but they spared Russia’s leader and foreign minister in that round of penalties.

A US official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss the Biden administration’s talks internally on the matter, said there was debate among administration officials about whether to include Lavrov in the sanctions, as some wanted to ensure a path for diplomatic contact remained open.

While the sanctions to be imposed would not ban contact between, for example, Putin and Biden, or US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Lavrov, they put a new chill on what had been weeks of repeated diplomatic efforts with Russia as Putin built up forces on Ukraine’s borders. The debate on including Lavrov went back and forth, and was one of the reasons the individual sanctions were not announced with Thursday’s other measures.

Ukraine’s ambassador to the US, Oksana Markarova, called the allies’ decision to freeze the assets of Putin himself the right one.

“It was President Putin’s decision to attack Ukraine. … And he is the one responsible for the war that the Russian Federation is now waging on us,” Markarova told reporters at Ukraine’s embassy in Washington.

The US Treasury Department was expected to release more details later Friday.

It was unclear what the practical impact on the two men would be and how important their assets in the EU were.

“I can assure you that if you got major assets and all of a sudden you can’t get hold of them, it will cost you,” said EU foreign affairs chief Josep Borrell.

EU ministers have said that even further sanctions were still possible, including booting Russia out of SWIFT, the dominant system for global financial transactions.

“The debate about SWIFT is not off the table, it will continue,” Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn said.

Admonishing Russia further, the Council of Europe suspended Russia from the continent’s foremost human rights organization. The 47-nation council said Russia remained a member and continued to be bound by the relevant human rights conventions.

Undeterred in the game of punitive sanctions, Russia started its own tit-for-tat measures, banning British flights to and over its territory in retaliation to a similar UK ban on Aeroflot flights.

Russian authorities also announced the “partial restriction” of access to Facebook after the social media network limited the accounts of several Kremlin-backed media.

Yet with the Kremlin’s eyes fully targeted on expanding the attacks on Ukraine, almost all the action was still going one way.

In terms unheard since the Cold War, threats were flying from all sides and ran through society.

In a sign of papal anger, Pope Francis went to the Russian Embassy to “express his concern about the war,” the Vatican said. It was an extraordinary, hands-on gesture, since usually popes receive ambassadors and heads of state in the Vatican .

The May 28 UEFA Champions League final, the Super Bowl of European soccer, was stripped from St. Petersburg and will move Paris. Formula One dropped this season’s Russian Grand Prix at Sochi in protest.

And in pop culture, the wildly popular Eurovision song contest banned Russia from the May finals in Turin, Italy.

Countries in Asia and the Pacific have joined the US, the EU and others in the West in piling on punitive measures against Russian banks and leading companies. The nations have also set up export controls aimed at starving Russia’s industries and military of semiconductors and other high-tech products.

“Japan must clearly show its position that we will never tolerate any attempt to change the status quo by force,” Prime Minister Fumio Kishida told reporters Friday.

Taiwan announced Friday that it would join in economic sanctions, although it did not specify what those would be. They could potentially be focused on export control of semiconductor chips, of which Taiwan is the dominant producer.

While most nations in Asia rallied to support Ukraine, China has continued to denounce sanctions against Russia and blamed the US and its allies for provoking Moscow. Beijing, worried about American power in Asia, has increasingly aligned its foreign policy with Russia to challenge the West.

“The Chinese government is following through on easing trade restrictions with Russia and that is simply unacceptable,” Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison complained. “You don’t go and throw a lifeline to Russia in the middle of a period when they’re invading another country.”

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Associated Press writers Foster Klug in Tokyo and Ellen Knickmeyer in Washington contributed to this report, along with other AP journalists around the world.

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Follow AP’s coverage of the Ukraine crisis at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

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student government provides funds to Society of Black Engineers to travel to convention | News https://avvensanchea.com/student-government-provides-funds-to-society-of-black-engineers-to-travel-to-convention-news/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 00:50:00 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/student-government-provides-funds-to-society-of-black-engineers-to-travel-to-convention-news/ UCF’s National Society of Black Engineers received student government funding to travel to the NSBE’s 48th Annual Convention in California. The conference will be an opportunity for members to attend workshops, participate in competitions and meet industry professionals. Courtesy of NSBE UCF Born in Nigeria, Abdul-Malik Mustapha saw few black people in STEM fields when […]]]>






UCF’s National Society of Black Engineers received student government funding to travel to the NSBE’s 48th Annual Convention in California. The conference will be an opportunity for members to attend workshops, participate in competitions and meet industry professionals.




Born in Nigeria, Abdul-Malik Mustapha saw few black people in STEM fields when he moved to the United States to major in electrical engineering at UCF.

Mustapha, academic excellence chair for the UCF chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers, said that while the field is evolving, the face of science, technology, engineering and mathematics is primarily made up of white men. He hopes younger minority students can learn from black STEM majors who are in the NSBE at UCF.

“Seeing black people come together and succeed, it was refreshing to see the impact of an organization like this,” Mustapha said. “I could see that being a part of this would definitely help me develop not only my professional skills, but also my technical skills.”

The Legislative Branch of Student Government passed a budget bill on January 20 that will provide funding for 25 NSBE members to travel to the NSBE’s 48th Annual Convention. This year’s convention will take place March 23-27 in Anaheim, California.

Black and Hispanic workers are vastly underrepresented in STEM occupations. Black professionals make up 9% of all STEM jobs while Hispanic professionals make up 8%, according to the Pew Research Center.

The NSBE at UCF strives to empower minority students to pursue studies in technical fields. The organization not only provides support to students, but also K-12 students. Mustapha said that through a series of workshop events, NSBE seeks to engage students in STEM activities.

NSBE MP Chad Jones said this convention will be a great opportunity for hard-to-navigate black engineers.

“It’s important because it brings visibility and it allows the vast majority to see why people from minority groups, especially black people, should have a seat at the table,” Jones said. “It’s an event where you can not only sell yourself, but you can grow yourself.”

NSBE Senator John Ajiniran said he was grateful to SG for being able to fund this event as the convention is important to all sections of NSBE.

“It will be a very good experience for the students,” said Ajiniran. “There will be lots of networking opportunities and leadership experiences with seminars etc.”

The funding provided by SG will cover half the cost of the trip, so it will cover about $11,250, according to budget bill 53-34. Funding comes from SG’s $20.4 million budget which comes from tuition. The Conference, Registration and Travel Committee allocates a total of $680,000 to be spent on student organizations and registered individuals, based on the activities and services fee budget.

Although SG funds half of it, the trip is still quite expensive for members, Mustapha said. The remaining cost per member totals approximately $400.

NSBE tries to reduce some of the remaining costs for its members through fundraising efforts, such as selling hoodies and t-shirts on its social media with the slogan “I STEM from greatness”. Profits will go to the 25 students who will attend the conference.

Students who were very active in NSBE were chosen from the 25 members who would receive funding from SG, Mustapha said. Other members who wish to attend the event will not benefit from a reduced price.

Senate SG Chairperson Chinyere Anunobi said she thought it was important for the SG to help minority students.

“One of our main challenges is how to reach these students,” Anunobi said. “It’s very important for us to make sure that we allocate money and use it for students who may not be comfortable asking for it or who may need help. »

Anunobi said ensuring that funding benefits students in the best possible way is the most important part.

Attending conferences and being part of NSBE gave Mustapha the confidence to step out of his comfort zone. He hopes that other members will take this opportunity to grow professionally and personally.

“It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for most of our members,” Mustapha said. “So SG’s help in this regard is very instrumental in the lives of our members who will be attending, as they have the opportunity to see not only people of their own ethnicity and race, but also to see role models who have also been through the process of what it is to be a black engineer in the United States”

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Universities should assess the value of experiential learning for PhDs (opinion) https://avvensanchea.com/universities-should-assess-the-value-of-experiential-learning-for-phds-opinion/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 08:01:17 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/universities-should-assess-the-value-of-experiential-learning-for-phds-opinion/ American research universities have embarked on extensive efforts to improve the Ph.D. training and make it more student-centred. A key theme has been fostering experiential learning, which challenges PhD students to apply their research and analytical skills to practical problems. As Bonnie Keeler pointed out in a recent Inside Higher Education essay on engaged scholarship, […]]]>

American research universities have embarked on extensive efforts to improve the Ph.D. training and make it more student-centred. A key theme has been fostering experiential learning, which challenges PhD students to apply their research and analytical skills to practical problems. As Bonnie Keeler pointed out in a recent Inside Higher Education essay on engaged scholarship, this focus appeals to a growing number of graduate students, who want to direct their research toward the most vexing challenges of our time, such as climate mitigation and the promotion of racial equity .

Among universities that have embraced this impulse, the most common approach has been to expand internship opportunities beyond campus. Long a feature of the doctorate. training in engineering and some natural sciences, such short-term internships have become more common in the humanities and social sciences, often facilitated by university funding that allows for the Ph.D. students to integrate into an NGO, community organization or government agency that cannot afford to provide stipends. The City University of New York Graduate Center with its Publics Lab, the University of Iowa with its Humanities for the Public Good program, the University of Chicago and my own institution, Duke University, are just four of the many institutions that have developed such courses. programs.

Other notable innovations abound. Through the University of Michigan HistoryLab, Ph.D. students have the opportunity to work with external partners, such as the United States Holocaust Museum, on public-facing team projects, in this case to develop online teaching modules related to the museum’s collections. In the Ph.D. in Pharmacology at Boston University. program, students complete one of their first-year research internships at a pharmaceutical company, giving them early exposure to the distinctive characteristics of industry science. The Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. The Plus program offers students a range of professional development modules that complement core disciplinary study and research. At Duke, I oversee the Bass Connections program, which places about 100 doctoral students each year. students who are part of interdisciplinary applied research teams that include faculty, graduate and professional students, and undergraduate students, often with external partner organizations.

Students tend to give high marks to these experiential learning opportunities. They cultivate important soft skills such as project management, the ability to work constructively in teams, and versatility in communicating with diverse audiences. They create a sense of community and foster intellectual self-confidence, especially when students have the opportunity to take on leadership roles and see completed projects have a tangible impact. In some cases, they reshape research programs and re-energize students. In almost all cases, they aid in career discernment, sometimes confirming a previous interest in an academic path, sometimes broadening horizons, and at least occasionally leading directly to excellent post-graduation employment. For all these reasons, the faculty members directly involved in these programs also sing their praises.

Throughout higher education, however, many professors consider experiential learning for the doctorate. students with raised eyebrows, even though they accept its value for undergraduates and professional students. Doctoral supervisors worry about distractions from basic disciplinary research, whether in the laboratory, in the archives, or in the field. They want to make sure the Ph.D. students cultivate the in-depth expertise and publication record that university hiring committees increasingly expect. Skeptical faculty members also worry that time spent on internships, short professional development courses, or interdisciplinary research teams will force students to take longer to complete their studies.

These concerns continue to shape faculty guidance and departmental culture. As a result, they limited the scope of experiential learning for the Ph.D. students, especially outside of highly applied fields who have a long track record of sending Ph.D. beneficiaries to non-academic employers.

Such faculty concerns are misplaced. For PhD students who embrace experiential learning, the time spent in such encounters remains a very modest fraction of their overall effort and can provide a healthy counterweight to the sometimes isolating aspects of the PhD. training. Additionally, students who complete an internship or join an interdisciplinary applied research team cultivate their ability to collaborate and translate ideas, improve their time management, and gain experience with mentoring. These skills are just as valuable for academic researchers and teachers as they are for doctoral students. holders working in companies, NGOs or government agencies.

Needed: more information and analysis

Nevertheless, we should not ignore faculty apprehension. Instead, we should assess experiential learning for the Ph.D. students in a much more structured way, testing whether the widespread unease among faculty members has merit. Research universities and graduate professors need much more information and analysis. We need a clearer inventory of programmatic experimentation – on experiential learning, of course, but also on efforts to diversify student cohorts, create more inclusive intellectual communities, improve the quality of advice and mentoring, to train doctoral students. teach students to teach effectively and ensure that curricula stay current with intellectual currents and modes of communication. We also need a comparative assessment of the impact of these innovations on student outcomes.

At Duke, we routinely interview students – and, where appropriate, external “hosts” – immediately after they have learned through experiential learning through a specific program such as Bass Connections or university-funded internships. We also began to re-engage participants a few years after these experiences, collecting reflections on the impact these experiences had on their subsequent trajectories. These efforts have underscored the benefits of experiential learning for many students in all divisions of knowledge.

Ideally, however, we would have a better understanding of the frequency of experiential learning among PhDs. students in general (this often happens outside of the formal curriculum and unbeknownst to academic advisors), as well as how these experiences shape intellectual growth and career discernment processes. We should also compare students who participate in experiential learning to their peers who do not in terms of attrition, time to graduation, and later career outcomes.

Main funders of the doctorate. education, including federal agencies and major foundations, can play a key role here. Much of the excitement of doctoral education has been catalyzed by the financial support it provides. In government, central enterprises have included the National Institutes of Health’s BEST (Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training) initiative, the National Science Foundation’s INTERN program (which provides financial support to students already funded by the NSF who wish to undertake a non-academic internship), and the National Endowment for the Humanities Next Generation Fellowships, which have encouraged new thinking about doctoral education in the humanities. Among the foundations, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation have awarded a series of large grants to universities piloting new directions in doctoral education.

Organizations that fund the Ph.D. The reform should sift through beneficiary reports and conduct retrospective surveys to map reforms and assess impacts. The NIH BEST program has led the way in this regard, generating research, for example, that suggests that when the biomedical Ph.D. students engage in extensive professional development activities, take no longer to graduate than their peers, and have no fewer publications upon graduation. Other donors should also intervene.

Higher education umbrella organizations should also engage. The Council of Graduate Schools, in partnership with the Association of American Universities, already offers an in-depth doctorate. student exit survey used by dozens of universities. The current version, however, doesn’t ask graduate students about internships or other experiential learning encounters, which seems like a huge missed opportunity. (AAU has also launched a major initiative to spark new innovations in student-centered doctoral education, in partnership with eight pilot campuses, including Iowa, University of Virginia, Boston University, and Duke .) Organizations like the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine should seek complementary opportunities to assess how reforms affect completion rates, program length, and career trajectories.

A consensus is developing among university administrators, external stakeholders and some faculty members that the Ph.D. training requires fresh thinking, including incorporating more experiential learning opportunities. This feeling goes hand in hand with the permanent skepticism of the faculty as to the impact of these new orientations on the quality of doctoral training. Let’s bring more evidence to bear on such an important debate.

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Georgia Symphony Orchestra receives $500,000 endowment and $10,000 grant https://avvensanchea.com/georgia-symphony-orchestra-receives-500000-endowment-and-10000-grant/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 12:38:18 +0000 https://avvensanchea.com/georgia-symphony-orchestra-receives-500000-endowment-and-10000-grant/ Marietta-based Georgia Symphony Orchestra received a $500,000 endowment and $10,000 grant from the Bobbie Bailey Foundation, Inc. for its music education program for young people. “We are honored to receive these extraordinary gifts from the Bailey Foundation to help fund our Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestras program,” G.S.O. Executive Director Taylor Rambo said in the press […]]]>

Marietta-based Georgia Symphony Orchestra received a $500,000 endowment and $10,000 grant from the Bobbie Bailey Foundation, Inc. for its music education program for young people.

“We are honored to receive these extraordinary gifts from the Bailey Foundation to help fund our Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestras program,” G.S.O. Executive Director Taylor Rambo said in the press release announcing the endowment and grant. “Our organization is committed to reducing barriers to accessible, high-quality music education experiences for talented students in Metro Atlanta and our region. These donations will allow us to take this commitment to a whole new level.

According to the press release:

The Bailey Foundation was founded in 1993 by businesswoman and philanthropist Bobbie Bailey, who had a deep passion for education, health, music and the arts, and for helping those less fortunate. Since then, the Foundation has partnered with nonprofit organizations, schools, and hospitals across the Southeastern United States to fulfill its mission to promote music and dance, enabling access to technologies cutting-edge health care and empowering women at risk.

About the Georgia Symphony Orchestra Youth Program

According to the G.S.O. websitethe Georgia Symphony Youth Orchestra was founded in 2006 and has become the largest such program in the Southeast.

The program includes five orchestras, a jazz ensemble, a percussion ensemble, chamber instrumental ensembles, and a youth choir, all selected through competitive statewide auditions.

According to the website:

GYSO’s mission is to inspire young people to discover their full potential through creativity and performance, and to build and develop the discipline and spirit to achieve their musical goals. Additionally, GYSO strives to provide artistic opportunities for all and improve the quality of cultural life in our communities.

The press release announcing the endowment states:

The GYSO program also has strong partnerships with Kennesaw State University’s Dr. Bobbie Bailey School of Music and Marietta City Schools. Additionally, a scholarship fund provides opportunities for students with financial need.

About the Georgia Symphony Orchestra

The Georgia Symphony Orchestra began in 1951 with the formation of the Marietta Music Club.

According to the G.S.O. website:

The music room in Arthur F. Moor’s home at 383 Church Street in Marietta would lay the foundations for what would evolve over the next sixty years. Talented local musicians would come together to create and share wonderful music with the public. From 1955 to 1989, Betty Shipman Bennett led the orchestra during this long period of development. The music club became the Marietta Community Symphony.

The orchestra was later renamed the Cobb Symphony as professional musicians were added to the staff, and in 2011 it became the Georgia Symphony Orchestra.

The GSO declares as mission:

The mission of the Georgia Symphony Orchestra is to enrich our community through accessible, high-quality musical and educational experiences that instill a lifelong appreciation for the arts.

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