The land debate in Winston Salem’s Happy Hill neighborhood continues

The debate over what to do with nine acres in a Winston-Salem community continues. The arts-based school withdrew its offer to purchase land in Happy Hill, an East Ward neighborhood, after the community spoke out, saying the land was for affordable housing and that it should stay that way. media on September 23 announcing their plan to withdraw from the territory. They released the following statement: “The arts-based school stands in solidarity with the Happy Hill Neighborhood Association‘s plans to develop more affordable housing units for families. We, the Happy Hill Neighborhood Association and Arts-Based School, share the same core values: engaging the community, building strong relationships, and putting people first. We, The Arts Based School, are publicly withdrawing our interest in the land in the Happy Hill neighborhood.” Some residents of the Happy Hill community said they were pleased that The Arts Based School withdrew their request to purchase 9 acres of land in the area, but now they’re asking the city to keep that land for what it was intended for, affordable housing can actually move into the houses and that we can create some generational wealth,” said Kayyum Allah, a member of the Happy Hill Neighborhood Association.Residents like Allah said they were not against building at Happy Hill, but wanted it to be for their community. “There will always be building on the land, but we want the building to be done for black people and as much as by black people, and we also want to maintain the rich heritage and culture that has already been established here in Happy Hill, said Allah. Housing Justice Now member Phillip Carter said: “This land and this community has been generationally marginalized and what I hope to see is that in the beginning the land is used to create a land trust . I would like to see this land trust in a percentage that is for African Americans. Winston-Salem Deputy City Manager Patrice Toney said the city may sell the land to someone else for another use. “If they sold it or decided to sell for a different purpose, then yes, it wouldn’t be affordable housing anymore. If it’s for a school, if it’s for a fire station, if it’s for other purposes, it takes away our ability to build additional affordable housing,” Toney said. Toney said city leaders, including Councilman Annette Scippio, plan to hold a town hall meeting in Happy Hill on Wednesday evening to explain the process for selling city-owned land, particularly affordable housing. has opportunities to continue to inform our community and the citizens in particular, the residents of the Happy Hill area, since this land was an issue and of concern,” Toney said his goal which is the continuation of a beautiful community.” The town-sponsored public meeting will be held at the William C Sims Community Center at 6 p.m. on September 28.

The debate over what to do with nine acres in a Winston-Salem community continues.

The arts-based school withdrew its offer to purchase land in Happy Hill, an East Ward neighborhood, after the community spoke out, saying the land was for affordable housing and that it should stay that way.

Leaders of the arts-based school posted on social media on September 23 announcing their intention to withdraw from the field. They released the following statement:

“The arts-based school is in line with plans by the Happy Hill neighborhood association to develop more affordable housing units for families. We, the Happy Hill Neighborhood Association and Arts-Based School, share the same core values: engaging the community, building strong relationships, and putting people first. We, The Arts Based School, are publicly withdrawing our interest in the land located in the Happy Hill area.”

Some residents of the Happy Hill community said they were glad the arts-based school withdrew their request to purchase 9 acres of land in the area, but now they are asking the city to keep that land for this to what it was intended for, affordable housing.

“Not just staying as affordable housing, but actually building houses on the land so that the descendants, the people of Happy Hill can actually move into the houses and we can build generational wealth,” Kayyum Allah said, member of the Happy Hill Neighborhood Association. .

Residents like Allah said they weren’t against building at Happy Hill, but wanted it to be for their community.

“There will always be building on the land, but we want building to be done for black people and as much as by black people, and we also want to maintain the rich heritage and culture that has already been established here at Happy Hill, “Allah said.

Housing Justice Now member Phillip Carter said: “This land and this community has been marginalized from generation to generation and what I hope to see is that in the beginning the land is used to create a trust I would like to see this land trust a percentage that is for African Americans.

Winston-Salem Deputy City Manager Patrice Toney said the city may sell the land to someone else for another use.

“If they sold it or decided to sell it for a different purpose, then yes, it wouldn’t be for affordable housing anymore. If it’s for a school, if it’s for a fire station, if it’s for other purposes, it takes away our ability to build additional affordable housing,” Toney said.

Toney said city leaders, including Councilman Annette Scippio, plan to hold a town hall meeting in Happy Hill on Wednesday night to explain the process for selling city-owned land, especially affordable housing.

“It is possible to continue to inform our community and the citizens in particular, the residents of the Happy Hill area, as this land was an issue and a concern,” Toney said.

Allah said: “I hope Happy Hill will be taken care of, the residents, our needs, our desires will be heard, and we can work together and achieve a common goal which is the continuation of a beautiful community.”

The town-sponsored public meeting will be held at the William C Sims Community Center at 6 p.m. on September 28.

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